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March 04, 1988 - Image 74

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1988-03-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I ANN ARBOR

HOUSE CALLS MADE
FOR NAIL AND FOOT CARE

DR. SEYMOURE BALAJ

HOUSE CALLS BY A
JEWISH DOCTOR

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Continued from preceding page

selves from other schools with
larger Jewish populations —
the so-called 'Oy Vey League."
For Spencer, these types of
behaviors indicated a confu-
sion of identity, perhaps an
element of self-denegration
within young Jews. "Here's
this very successful Jewish
community but still
somewhat marginal to the
larger community," he says.
Perhaps it's lost its way.
What Spencer found at
Syracuse wasn't unique. He
says the same kind of things
are happening in other
universities, primarily larger
urban schools with signifi-
cant Jewish populations.
Spencer admits that some
of his colleagues felt that he
was looking at a non-issue. "I
got a very mixed response
from my peers!'
Others, like Jeff Ross, direc-
tor of the department of high-
er education and campus af-
fairs at the Anti-Defamation
League of B'nai B'rith in New
York, were pleased that he
was giving attention to some-
thing so omnipresent that
people couldn't see its in-
sidious quality. "The evidence
seems to suggest that the
phenomonon of JAP baiting is
extremely widespread," says
Ross. "And Gary is responsi-
ble for sensitizing us to the
problem?'
Others seem to agree that
it's an issue that needs to be
addressed. Spencer's talks
have attracted a lot of atten-
tion from the media, from
Jewish and women's organi-
zations and from other uni-
versities. "The good news is
that it's been brought out of
the closet!' Spencer says.
At Syracuse over 500 people
came to hear him; at the
University of Michigan 250
filled the room in the Student
Union on a snowy Thursday
night. "The fact that so many
came indicates that there's a
problem and they want to
know about it," says U-M stu-
dent Sondra Panico.
Many students at Michigan
would concur. "I agree with
what he's said. But first Jews
have to stop calling each oth-
er JAPs before they can ex-
pect others to!' says student
Beth Bernhaut.
Though there may be no
anti-JAP zones or bars in Ann
Arbor, there is an omnipre-
sent use of the term. "There's
a lot of kike jokes, Jew jokes,
JAP jokes," says Panico, who
proposed the student assem-
bly's JAP resolution. "You see
it all the time?' The steps
Jews at Michigan have taken
to combat the JAP-baiting
problem is a good beginning,
Spencer feels. Actions that in-
form others that their words

Prof. Gary Spencer: A problem
nation-wide.

and sentiments won't be al-
lowed or tolerated without
some response are important.
"It's peer pressure that allows
it to continue!' says Spencer.
ADL's Ross feels that
students aren't the only one
who need to take a stance.
"The most important thing is
that (university) administra-
tions have to recognize it as a
serious problem and make it
abundently clear that it will
not be tolerated?' 1=1

Holiday Debate
In Ann Arbor

A farcial debate on two
Jewish delicacies, "The Latke
vs. the Hamantashen," will be
presented at 6 p.m. Sunday at
the Jewish Community
Center of Washtenaw County
in celebration of Purim. With
such feature presentations as
"The Early Roman Latke"
and "Diseases Caused by
Hamantashen," four speakers
will address the issue.
Defending the "Holy
Hamantashen" against the
"Lousy Latke" will be Profs.
Paul W. Gikas, a medical ex-
aminer and coroner, and Ger-
da Seligson, University of
Michigan a classics scholar.
-Speaking for the "Lovely
Latke" and against the
"Hellish Hamantashen" will
be Dr. Henry Appelman, pro-
fessor of pathology at the
University of Michigan, and
Dr. Mel Gluckman, a
pharmacologist.
Carl Cohen, U-M professor
of philosophy will be
moderator for the event.
For reservations, call the
Washtenaw Jewish Center,
971-0990. There is a charge.

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