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February 12, 1988 - Image 60

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1988-02-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

ENTERTAINMENT

COUPON

FAMILY ITALIAN DINING & PIZZA

4033 W. 12 MILE, 3 Blks. E. of Greenfield
Berkley
548-3650

PIMA—RIBS—FISH
SQUARE PIZZA
ROUND PIZZA
HOMEMADE GARLIC BREAD SMALL OR LARGE SMALL—MED—LARGE

1 OFF

ON FOOD PURCHASES
OF $6 OR MORE

DINING ROOM, CARRY-OUT

Expires Feb. 28, 1988

• BANQUET ROOMS
• BEER • WINE
• COMPLETE CARRY-OUT • COCKTAILS

HE BRASS POINTE

WINTER SPECIALS

BAR-B-Q SLAB FOR 2. $ 11 45

BAR-B-Q CHICKEN FOR 2

I GOOD ANYHOUR! ANYDAY!

$7 95

DINE-IN OR CARRY-OUT

Expires 2-18-88

THE BRASS POINTE

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK FROM 11 a.m.
24234 Orchard Lake Rd. at 10 Mile
476-1377

Restaurant

6066 W. MAPLE,

North of Orchard Lake Rd. •

851-6577

CARRY-OUT DEPT.

NEXT DOOR TO OUR FULL-SERVICE RESTAURANT

Featuring

• Pizza • Ribs • Greek Salads • Lasagna
• Chicken • Sandwiches • Etc.

OUTSIDE CATERING FOR
ALL OCCASIONS

TCOUPONT

$2 OFF DINNER FOR 2

SLAB OF RIBS

• BAG OF BREAD STICKS

• GREEK SALAD

CARRY-OUT LOCATION ONLY

Expires March 12, 1988

JN

BUY ONE PIZZA

GET 2ND SAME PIZZA

CARRY-OUT
LOCATION ONLY

60

FREE

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 1988

Expires March 12, 1988

JN

Detroit's Hurok

Continued from preceding page

ly recalls his extended fami-
ly as a combination mah jong-
poker club. This family clan
nurtured cousins whose pre-
sent occupations run the
gamut from rabbis in New
York to stage and television
actors.
After high school, Lichtens-
tein attended Stetson Univer-
sity in Florida, a Baptist
school where he was the only
Jew and where he mixed his
academics with work as pro-
duction manager and rock
group promoter. Later, atten-
ding Yale School of
Dramatics, he studied theater
design technology, which in-
cluded lighting, sound and
production. He continued his
practical involvement in show
business, working in theater
box offices and grabbing
every possible opportunity to
work as a stage hand.
During these years, he
garnered experience at the
Shubert Theater in New
Haven, worked as box office
manager for Oakdale Theater
in Wallingford, Conn. — a
Pine Knob sort of enterprise
— and also did a stint as assis-
tant manager at a New
Haven arena.
Celebrating more than ten
years in Detroit, Lichtenstein
first came here in answer to
a "summons" from a former
Yale professor. At that time,
he was managing the Murray
Luis Dance Company in New
York, along with a few other
management ventures, but
Detroit sounded good, so he
"packed his bags."
Lichtenstein ran Detroit's
Music Hall for a year and a
half and then got involved
with the Entertainment cou-
pon book company. Referring
to that position as a "one man
premium division," he set up
entertainment accounts in
new markets and organized
premium shows, repackaging
the Entertainment passbooks
as premium gifts.
Soon, however, the oppor-
tunity came for Lichtenstein
to work out an arrangement
with the Masonic Temple
Theater Association whereby
he would manage the build-
ing, bring in attractions and
open a theater season.
The first such season,
1980-1981 was highlighted by
The King and I with Yul
Brenner, Camelot with
Richard Harris, Mad Woman
of Central Park with Phyllis
Newman, One More Time and
Sesame Street Live. The
merger with the Neder-
landers followed shortly
thereafter, with the intention
of offering every advantage to
the Masonic.
Detroit's present theater
season has been compatible
with Lichtenstein's aspiration

No matter how busy his day, Lichtenstein says he enjoys every aspect of
his work.

for diversity; it opened with
Sound of Music, starring Deb-
by Boone, and was followed in
September by the national
tour of Arsenic and Old Lace,
with a cast including Marion
Ross, Jean Stapleton, Jona-
than Fried, Larry Storch and
Gary Sandy. It also delighted
audiences with a "guest
corpse" — a local celebrity —
every evening. Tango Argen-
tina in December-January
was followed by a star-
studded concert series, ex-
ecuted in cooperation with
the Detroit News. Headliners
will be Julie Andrews,
Johnny Mathis, Engelbert
Humperdinck and Whoopi
Goldberg. The end of March
will see the national tour of
the musical revival, Me and

My Girl.

The 1987-1988 season at
the Masonic Temple has
featured a number of con-
certs, with well known artists
and musicians performing
rhythm and blues, soul music,
jazz, gospel and rock. Promi-
nent among these enter-
tainers were The Winans,
The Whispers, Joe Cocker,
James Taylor, Dan Fogelberg,
comedian Jay Leno and
author-lecturer Leo Buscag-
lia. Booked for February ap-
pearances are Sting and the
Virsky Ukranian Dance
Group from Russia.
With a currently successful
season in progress, Lichten-
stein continues to aspire to
give Detroit the very best. For
example, he said he hopes to
bring Les Miserables to the
Fisher; he loves the score of
Chess and would like to bring
it to town. In the next few
years, he says, "My goal is to
bring Starlite Express to
Detroit. I think Masonic Tem-
ple was built for Starlite Ex-

press." Phantom of the Opera

is also on Lichtenstein's list,
and with his past record, it's
likely Detroit will, in fact, be
treated to these performances
soon.
Lichenstein expresses satis-
faction in working with orga-
nizations such as Channel 56
and Wayne State University
on benefits and is, himself, a
member of Variety Club,
Detroit Council of the Arts
and the Council of New
Detroit. He is an avid art col-
lector who dabbled as an art
dealer for a few years, and
particularly enjoys collecting
the work of Detroit artists
Steven Goodfellow and Steven
Hansen.
Lichtenstein, 37, and his
wife, the former Susan
Kramer, center much of their
leisure time ' around three-
year-old son Max, who, says
Lichtenstein . . . "has a whole
set of activities I have to do
with him, such as planting in
the garden, going to the
playground and visiting
neighborhood friends."
Another family connection
to show business is Lichten-
stein's brother, Stuart, who is
co-owner and operator of Sar-
di's Restaurant in New York.
When e books opening act
parties, Lichtenstein makes it
a point to attend.
Lichtenstein is a bundle of
energy. He may be honing in
on marketing and publicity,
concentrating on scheduling,
sales and strategy, and deal-
ing with technicalities involv-
ing staging, sound systems
and lighting, or running in
and out of town, wheeling and
dealing from 42nd Street in
New York to the heart of
downtown Detroit. It's a per-
formance for which Detroiters
can gratefully exclaim,
"Bravo!" [1]

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