100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

The University of Michigan Library provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes. These materials may be under copyright. If you decide to use any of these materials, you are responsible for making your own legal assessment and securing any necessary permission. If you have questions about the collection, please contact the Bentley Historical Library at bentley.ref@umich.edu

January 29, 1988 - Image 82

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1988-01-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

OVER 60?

88

No Financial Plan
Is Complete
Without

SPRING

NURSING HOME
INSURANCE!

SUMMER

DON'T WAIT
UNTIL IT'S
TOO LATE!

and

fabrics are here!

VISIT US AND WE'LL CUSTOM
CREATE A TASTEFUL AND
ENDURING WARDROBE FOR YOU

669-1440

PAMQ__A SWI-T, LTD.

complimentary consultation • alterations

b

O

0 e

4 o.

lo

d i S

ve \-PS

• PAYS UP TO $3000 A MONTH
• NO MEDICAL EXAM REQUIRED
• COVERS PRE-EXISTING
MEDICAL CONDITIONS
• POLICY GUARANTEED
RENEWABLE — FOR LIFE!

For Free Brochure

Call: 626-8326

Brennan-Jarvis Insurance

28230 Orchard Lake Road
Farmin•ton Hills MI 48018

d

,.... 0°

0%° \s G O 6 sS Os°

0
rie
er
,x\
•1 ' 1 e op bb

We are now a factory outlet
selling all current merchandise
at 40%-70% OFF


``\

e‘ s As

es

eS S

S

' , ‘ ‘ I`I‘ se :; e1(\ e e‘.

c ce c

Please stop by for our Grand Opening
and join us for wine, cheese & sweets.

1(‘
6 1. 6

Monday-Friday 10 a.m.-4 p.m.
Sunday 12 noon-4 p.m.

Lose inches
with
body tonin
FREE

INTRODUCTORY
VISIT

• NO MEMBERSHIP
REQUIRED
• WITH APPOINTMENT
ONLY
• WITH COUPON ONLY

New Clients Only

Call for your free appointment

L

82

FOCUS

626 4442

-

FRIDAY, JANUARY 29, 1988

SPECIAL

2
FREE

VISITS WITH
PURCHASE OF
10 VISITS

7315 ORCHARD LAKE RD. • WEST BLOOMFIELD

BEHIND I BROWSE BOOKSTORE

626.4442

futureshape

Prisoner

Continued from preceding page

while he may once have ex-
pressed despair • over the
course of the war, Begin feels
no remorse.
"There's certainly no guilt,"
says Hart Hasten.
But a one-time close aide,
former Cabinet secretary
Aryeh Naor, says things are
not that simple. Begin the
commander in chief will never
blame Sharon, a subordinate,
for what happened in
Lebanon, Naor says, but
Begin the man will never be
reconciled to the alleged
deception and losses.
"He doesn't feel guilty, but
he feels responsible, and he
feels betrayed," Naor says.
"He'll never say it, in public
or in private. But he feels it,
and he suffers deeply.
"Think about it. The man
leaves his house once a year.
Where does he go? The ceme-
tery There is a burden on him
that he will never let go."
Aliza died of a heart attack
five months after the invasion
while Begin was away on a
trip to the United States. She
was his strength, his defender
and his friend. His guilt at
not being by her side and his
sense of loss overwhelmed
him. At the same time,
Israel's economy was falling
apart and the Cabinet, once
subordinate to the charis-
matic power of the old man,
was disintegrating into a frac-
tious mob of petty rivals at
war with each other and with
the leader they once had all
revered.
His health, never good,
seemed to collapse. His
energy flagged. And so he
chose to hide. For a while, his
friends and disciples said he
was only biding his time,
gathering up strength before
reentering the arena. He was
planning his memoirs, eager
to set the record straight and
bask in the glory of history.
It never happened. Begin
has stayed locked away. The
memoirs — they were to be
called "Generation of Holo-
caust and Redemption" —
were never started, the silence
never broken.
Others have tried to pick up
the flag. Begin's only son,
Benjamin, has challenged
Sharon publicly about the
war, even opposed Sharon for
a position at last year's Herut
convention. Sharon won han-
dily, a victory that signaled
the passing of an era and in-
dicated that even the faithful
recognized their old leader
was gone and not likely to
return.

Begin stayed out of that
fight, just as he shunned in-
volvement in the last election
campaign, in which his one-
time close ally, Yitzhak
Shamir, was narrowly de-
feated by the more dovish
Labor Party and Shimon

Peres, a longtime political
enemy. Many in Herut
blamed Begin for not cam-
paigning, for abandoning
them, for seeming not to care.
Israelis see Begin's exile
through the prism of their
own politics. The left has
begun to revise its view of its
old enemy: Begin takes the
blame for his own failures, it
is said, unlike today's leaders,
hollow men who have ducked
responsibility for a series of
governmental mishaps. The
right sees him as a victim,
hounded out of office and
driven into isolation by the
jackals of the media and the
peaceniks who howled for his
blood after Lebanon.
There is a little truth to
both sides, says Ned Temko,
a former Christian Science

"Begin doesn't feel
guilty, but
responsible and
betrayed. There is
a burden on him
he will never let
go"

Monitor correspondent here
and author of a new Begin
biography, "lb Win or Die."
But at this point, says Thmko,
even if Begin wanted to re-
emerge, he may, at 74, lack
the energy to do battle on
Israel's contentious public
scene.
"If he could set everything
right with a simple sentence
or two, then he probably
would," Ibmko says. "The
problem is not just the
Lebanon war but that every-
thing else he prided himself
for in his life — for personal-
ly taking charge, for what he
was doing — seems under-
mined by that final chapter.
"In 1985, when it looked
like he might come out, peo-
ple immediately wrote that
there were lots of questions
along with Lebanon that he
would have to answer. I think
he senses he's likely to have a
rather rough ride, and I don't
think he's up to answering
them."
Hasten says Begin has the
energy but just doesn't want
to expend it. "I saw him three
weeks ago, and to me he
looked as good as he did as
prime minister, maybe even
better. His mind is as clear as
ever. He still has a photo-
graphic memory, and he reads
everything.
"We urge him to go out
more, and we beg and plead
with him to write his
memoirs. But he's a stubborn
man, and you can't talk him
into anything. He responds
when he feels the situation re-
quires it. Otherwise, he's will-

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan