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January 29, 1988 - Image 76

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1988-01-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

BARRY'S
LETS RENT
IT

1 ,4.11.11

Seen
• •
• ••

• • •
• • •

PARTY RENTALS
OUR NEW LOCATION

Tmuoir Kinuoir

1393 ORCHARD LAKE RD. N. OF LONE PINE

IN CROSSWINDS (FORMER PINE LAKE HALL)

1855-0480 I

COUNTRY CORNERS

13 MILE ROAD AT SOUTHFIELD ROAD

1110

647.4646

SOUTHEAST CORNER ON 13 MILE RI SIDE

OPEN YEAR-ROUND - 7 DAYS A WEEK

1COMMUNICATIONS

MON.-SAT. 9 a.m.-8 p.m., SUN. 9 a.m.-5 p.m.

THE BRIGHT IDEA

THE JEWISH NEWS

send
as a gift

NC.

BEEPERS • FAX • TELEX
[313] 474-7777

SUBURBAN
ANSWERING
SERVICE'

354 6060

-

The same family.

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Yes, buckwheat is botanically related to rhubarb. Buckwheat, contrary
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and discover the world of the UNSUNG FRUIT!

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(Failure to comply may void all
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through brokers or other outside

STORE COUPON

agencies. Coupons are non-
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must pay any sales tax. Cash
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OUR SALESMAN OR MAIL TO
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76

I COOKING I

FRIDAY, JANUARY 29, 1988

Fruity 1111reats

Continued from Page 74

Hayyim Vital and other Six-
teenth Century Sephardic
Kabbalists living in Safed.
From Safed, interest in these
rituals spread throughout
Europe, Asia and North
Africa. By the mid-Eight-
eenth Century, the Tu
B'Shevat
prayers and
readings were arranged in a
distinctive order or use in a
service.
They appeared in a pub-
lished work entitled Pri Etz
Hadar ... [which] includes a
Tu B'Shevat "Seder' based on
the practices of the scholars of
Safed.'
Ever since I first learned of
the Sephardic custom of a Tu
B'Shevat Seder (about six
years ago), my family and I
have celebrated the holiday
by observing this uplifting
ritual in our own home.
Though our yard may be
snow-covered and the outdoor
temperature is often in the
teens, we are warmed with
thoughts of Spring and its
seasonal rebirth. We enjoy the
four cups of wine (grape juice
for the younger children) and
always have at least 15 dif-
ferent types of dried fruit and
nuts (for the date on the
Hebrew calendar) as well as
fresh fruit.
Also, our meals on Tu
B'Shevat always feature dried
fruit and nuts, in hopes of a
frutiful Israeli (and world-
wide) growing season. Follow-
ing are a few dishes that
would be appropriate for Tu
B'Shevat.
(Note: More information
about the Tu B'Shevat Seder
can be found in Sephardic
Holiday Cooking by Gilda
Angel, The Jewish Holidays
by Michael Strassfield,
, and The Jewish Holiday

Cookbook: An International
Collection of Recipes and
Customs by Gloria Kaufer
Greene. Also, A Seder for Tu
B'Shevat is a modern-day ver-
sion of a Tu B'Shevat "hag-
gadah" that is loosely based
on Pri Etz Hadar and the
Passover haggadah, and can
be used by all members of the
family for an enjoyable cele-
bration. The illustrated, inex-
pensive ($2.95) book is
published by Kar-Ben Copies
of Rockville, Maryland.)

FRUIT-AND-NUT-
FILLED PASTRY
This recipe is adapted from
one that I found in a now-
defunct (unfortunately)
magazine called
The
Pleasures of Cooking as part
of an article by Michele
Scicolone about Italian
specialties.

DOUGH:
11/2 cups all-purpose flour
3 tablespoons sugar

1 /4 teaspoon salt
3 tablespoons butter or
margarine
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
6 tablespoons water

FILLING:
/2 cup blanched slivered
almonds
1 /2 cup walnut pieces
1 /3 cup light or dark
raisins*
5 plump dried calimyra
(brown)
figs, stem removed and
diced
5 plump pitted prunes,
diced*
2 tablespoons sugar
1 teaspoon grated lemon
peel (optional)
1 /4 cup sweet red wine
2 teaspoons vegetable oil
GARNISH:
Confectioners sugar
For the dough, put the flour,
sugar and salt into a medium-
sized bowl. Add the butter (or
margarine) and oil, and cut in
until the mixture resembles
coarse crumbs. While tossing
the mixture with a fork,
gradually sprinkle the water
on top. Gather the dough in-
to a disk, wrap in plastic, and
chill for about 1 hour so it is
easier to roll out. (A food pro-
cessor may be used to make
the dough. After the water is
added, process only about 10
seconds or until the dough
begins to come together; do
not overprocess or the pastry
will be tough.)

1

For the filling, combine all
the ingredients in a medium-
sized bowl. (Note: if the
raisins, figs, and prunes seem
very dry and tough, soften
them for about 20 minutes in
hot water before chopping;
then drain, pat dry and chop.)
Roll out the pastry on a
lightly floured surface to a 22-
by 6-inch rectangle. Spoon the
filling down the center, leav-
ing a 2-inch border on the
long sides and a 1/2-inch bor-
der at the ends. Fold the long
sides over the filling and
pinch the edges tightly to-
gether. Then pinch the ends
closed to form a long "snake."

Gently bend the snake into
a"U"- or "S"-shape (so it will
fit in your pan) and carefully
transfer it to a greased or
nonstick-spray coated baking
sheet. Bake in a preheated
375-degree oven for about 35
minutes or until golden. Cool
for 10 minutes on the baking
sheet; then carefully transfer
to a rack to cool more com-
pletely. (It may be served
warm at this point.) Just
before serving, sprinkle the
pastry with sieved confec-
tioners sugar. Cut into wide
slices to serve. Makes 8 to 10
servings.

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