100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

The University of Michigan Library provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes. These materials may be under copyright. If you decide to use any of these materials, you are responsible for making your own legal assessment and securing any necessary permission. If you have questions about the collection, please contact the Bentley Historical Library at bentley.ref@umich.edu

January 29, 1988 - Image 48

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1988-01-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SPORTS

Campers diving into action.

Weight training at Tanuga Swim Camp.

Camping Out

How do you find the best sports camp?

MIKE ROSENBAUM

I

Sports Writer

here are sports camps for
serious young athletes, camps
for intermediate level ath-
letes, camps for beginners.
There are fun camps which in-
clude sports. Day camps, overnight
camps, high school camps, college
camps — you get the idea. Young
athletes and their parents may have
a tough job ahead of them to find the
right sports camp for their child.
A good first step for parents is to
seek advice of an expert who is un-
biased, familiar with camps and the
prospective camper.
"The first thing I'd tell them is to
go and consult their son or daughter's

coach," says Bloomfield Hills Andover
varsity basketball coach Rick Kris-
niski. "Most coaches in the area know
of camps that are good camps and
receive a lot of brochures and so forth.
So they're probably the best resource
person that parents can talk to:'
Speaking to a high school varsity
coach in your school district, even if
your child is not yet in high school,
can also be productive. While most
coaches will be happy to help any
player develop better skills, some
might be more motivated to help a
player they might one day coach.
For basketball players, Krisniski
feels a good camp can yield excellent
benefits. "I really think kids, to
become really good basketball
players, need to work on their game.

It's a skill sport and they have to

enough courts for the amount of
players they have. Six or eight courts
may sound like a lot of courts, until
you find out there's 150 kids .. .
"The second thing you want to
Bob Jenrow, a coach with the look at is the personnel. Who's run-
Birmingham-Bloomfield Atlantis ning the program, their experience at
swim club, often gives parents advice running-camps, who they choose to be
on choosing camps, but he does so their instructors at the camp. That
carefully. "I have to have a look at the can vary from camps that, say, are
kid and look at his background and run like the (Nick) Bollettieri Tennis
think about which one would be best Academy down in Florida — they have
for him?'
their regular year-round personnel —
Jon Fischer, a tennis instructor at to other camps that maybe pros or
Franklin Racquet Club who coaches coaches run in the summer . . . Most
Lisa Bonder, a world-class player from college coaches run something like
Saline, offers advice which can be ap- that. Then there's also camps asso-
ciated with a lot of universities.
plied to all sports camps.
"You want to get an idea, first of The University of Michigan and Mich-
all, of their facilities. Whether there's Continued on Page 50

spend a lot of time at it and camps
provide the opportunity for them to
really work on their game and give
them drills and so forth:'

ROUND UP

Australians,
JCC Split

The Australian Maccabi
basketball team, on the last
stop of its month-long U.S.
tour, split two games with
Detroit Jewish Community
Center teams on Monday at
the Maple/Drake JCC. The
teams were scheduled to play
once more on Wednesday.
In the seniors game Mon-
day afternoon, Detroit came
back from a 20-point deficit
and pulled out a 71-69 win.
Tare Wigod hit both ends of a
one-and-one free throw oppor-
tunity with eight seconds left

48

FRIDAY, JANUARY 29, 1988

to break the 69-all tie.
The Australians led 37-22
at halftime and built a
20-point lead before Detroit
began its rally late in the
third quarter. They pulled
ahead midway through the
final period. The lead chang-
ed hands eight times before
Detroit won it.
Peter May and Jeff Mayer
scored 20 points apiece and
Wigod added 14 — all in the
second half — for the JCC.
Richard Smart had 27 and
Charley Rotstayn 25 for the
Aussies.
In the 13-16-year-old game,
the Australians took a 10-0
lead on their way to a 54-42

win. Australia held a 21-7
lead after one quarter. Again,
Detroit came back, cutting
the lead to two points in the
third quarter. But the
Australians pulled away in
the final minutes.
Adam Wrublewski led the
winners with 18 points and
Michael Lewis had 13. Wigod
paced the JCC with 15.

Swimmers Set
For Indy Meet

Local swimmers Dena
Bernstein, Linda Goldstein
and Jody Shapiro will com-
pete in a United States

Swimming-sponsored meet in
Indianapolis this weekend.
Competition runs through
Sunday. It is the first major
meet of the year for all three
swimmers.

Bulls Win
In JCC Hoops

The Bulls (2-0) pulled out a
tight game against the
Mavericks (0-2) in Honey Ber-
ris League basketball action
Sunday, 50-46. The lead
changed hands several times
before the Bulls took charge.
Dave Baxter led all scorers for
the Bulls with 31 points. Ibny

Jenkins tallied 21 for the
Mavericks.
The Celtics (2-1) routed the
Pistons (1-1) 52-17 in the se-
cond game Sunday. Mead
Palmer scored 14 points for
the Celtics.
On Jan. 20, the Rockets
(1-1) pulled away from the
Lakers (1-1) in the final 30
seconds for a 61-57 win. Ed
Finch scored 16 for the win-
ners, Harry Glanz 14 for the
losers. Also, the Celtics broke
open a 23-23 game in the se-
cond half to beat the 76'ers
(1-1) 51-41. Jerry Flowers had
17 points for the Celtics while
Keith Tobin tallied ten for the
76'ers.

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan