100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

The University of Michigan Library provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes. These materials may be under copyright. If you decide to use any of these materials, you are responsible for making your own legal assessment and securing any necessary permission. If you have questions about the collection, please contact the Bentley Historical Library at bentley.ref@umich.edu

January 15, 1988 - Image 56

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1988-01-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

ENTERTAINMENT

FROZEN YOGURT

ICE CREAM

Haggerty Rd., South of 14 Mile

$

1 25

Dirty Dancing

661-3470

ANY ICE CREAM PIE
MADE TO ORDER

OFF

Continued from preceding page

NO LIMIT!

WE USE THE FINEST INGREDIENTS: FRESH NUTS, FRUITS, CHOCOLATES, FUDGES, ETC.

r-

1

I COUPON

50% OFF

SECOND BRUNCH WITH PURCHASE OF ANOTHER

SUNDAY BRUNCH

11 a.m. to 3 p.m.

S 9 95 Adults

$ 6 5° Children 10 & Under

On The Grille
Family
Dining
27815 Middlebelt at W. 12 Mile Rd. • Farm. Hills • 851-8222

Expires Jan. 25, 1988
JN

HE BRASS POINTE

r-

WINTER SPECIALS

BAR•B-Q SLAB FOR 2.. $

BAR-B•Q CHICKEN FOR 2

GOOD ANYHOUR! ANYDAY!

I

11 45
$ 795

DINE-IN OR CARRY•OUT

Expires 1-21-88

THE BRASS POINTE

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK FROM 11 a.m.
24234 Orchard Lake Rd. at 10 Mile
476-1377

58

FRIDAY, JANUARY 15, 1988

"My intention was to honor
the Borsht Belt and show its
great grace," claimed Bergs-
tein. She did warn them that
there was a risk that once the
script was made into a film,
it would be out of her hands.
But Bergstein was able to
counter her fears about the
script being distorted by co-
producing the film with Lin-
da Gottlieb and having a
close working relationship
with the director, Emile Ar-
dolino. An Academy Award-
winning theater and dance
director, Ardolino was recep-
tive to Bergstein's vision of
her summer world. "I wanted
to capture this last graceful
moment of Jewish liberalism
which was at the end of
Camelot itself. And I am so
grateful to the director for
sharing this vision with me
and feel equal responsibility
in honoring this world."
Both Bergstein and the
choreographer, Kenny Ortego,
had grown up doing dirty
dancing, each on a different
coast. They would
demonstrate their teenage
moves for the cast on the set.
And Ortega incorporated his
memories to create dance
scenes in the film, reminis-
cent of West Side Story
routines and early 1960s
"soul dancing" with a Latin
accent.
Bergstein was at the audi-
tions the day that Jennifer
Grey, daughter of actor Joel
Grey, tried out. She recalled
that the younger Grey, like all
the main actors, had to first
demonstrate she could dance.
It had been decided that
unlike Flashdance, there
would be no stand-ins for the
dance scenes. Grey later ad-
mitted that she never wanted
a part so much in her life
since it was so much like
herself. She won the part on
the first try, but kept on in-
sisting she could do the danc-
ing better and did it again.
In a recent New York Times
interview, Grey claimed that
Hollywood thought her "too
Jewish for roles, like
Flashdance. But the one that
killed me was Down and Out
in Beverly Hills," she said. "I
thought, if I can't play Bette
Midler's daughter and
Richard Dreyfuss's daughter,
why am I in this business?"
When casting the part of
Johnny, Bergstein told the
director she wanted an actor
whose eyes could turn cold
when he was withdrawn and
not show his vulnerability.
Patrick Swayze's publicity
picture captured her eye. His
experience as a professional
dancer and his acting ability
made him a perfect choice as
Johnny.
When Bergstein was asked

if she thought Dirty Dancing
was a woman's movie, she
disagreed. She felt that men
could easily identify with the
film in two ways. One with
the father's story of the "sum-
mer when your daddy finally
lets you go." And young men
identify with Johnny's
toughness on the outside and
how he holds his fears inside.

Bergstein had toyed with
the idea of using the owners,
like Paul Grossinger and
Murray Posner, as witnesses
throughout the film, like the
technique employed in Reds.
Although this idea never
made it on the screen, she
feels confident that she was
able to "enter into the Cat-
skills world . . . in a respect-
ful and loving manner."
Her phone is now ringing
off the hook with con-
gratulatory calls from those
she interviewed who have
seen the film or heard about
it. They thanked her for
bringing this world to the
screen. She had received calls
from dance instructors as well
as from Grossinger who had
heard good reports about the
film and was planning to see
it soon.
Both her parents have died

and she bemoans the fact that
they are not around to see the
family portrait in the film.
While she was being inter-
viewd, her sister stopped by to
get a couple Dirty Dancing t-
shirts. Her sister wanted to
wear them on her vacation
where she was going golfing.
Bergstein claims that her
sister was a mathematician
in her adolescence, and that
the character of Baby's sister
was really closer to her.
Bergstein is also a novelist
and short story writer. She
majored in creative writing
with a minor in politics at the
University of Pennsylvania.
Her first novel was Advancing
Paul Newman and she has
another one coming out next
fall. Her first screenplay was
a comedy, It's My Turn, which
starred Jill Clayburgh and
Michael Douglas. She has a
script about a call-in talk
show that was written with
Dr. Ruth Westheimer in
mind. But with the "AIDS
scare," she is re-writing it.
She has been married for 20
years to a professor of
Shakespeare and modern
drama at Princeton. She
claims, "He had to learn to
dance before I would marry
him!'



GOING PLACES

Continued from preceding page

Sunday, admission,
832-2730.

CELEBRATION OF
JEWISH ARTS

WARREN SYMPHONY
ORCHESTRA

Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre, David Broza, 8
p.m. Wednesday, admission,
763-TKTS.

Warren Woods Community
Theater, Warren, Eduardo
and Eduardito Rahn, 3:30
p.m. Sunday, admission,
754-2950.

BIRD OF PARADISE

207 Ashley, Ann Arbor,
Betty Carter, now through
Saturday, admission,
662-8310.

LYRIC CHAMBER
ENSEMBLE

Edsel & Eleanor Ford
House, 1100 Ladeshore Dr.,
pianists Joseph Gurt and
Fedora Horowitz, 3:30 p.m.
Sunday, admission,
357-1111.

GRAND RAPIDS
SYMPHONY
ORCHESTRA

ART SHOWS

Orchestra Hall, Detroit,
Catherine Comet,
conductor, 3:30 p.m.
Sunday, admission,
833-3700.

1160 Welch Rd., Walled
Lake, Richard Brooks and
Rose Brown, Jan. 16
through Feb. 20, 669-9593.

DETROIT SYMPHONY

SOUTHFIELD PARKS
AND RECREATION

NAWARA GALLERY

Ford Auditorium, Detroit,
Stravinsky,Petrushk a and
Shostakovich, Symphony
No.1 8 p.m. Friday, 8:30
p.m. Saturday, admission,
567-1400.

26000 Evergreen Rd.,
Multi-Media Art, Monday
through Jan. 29, free,
354-4717.

MICHIGAN SCHOOL
BAND AND
ORCHESTRA
ASSOCIATION

29469 Northwestern Hwy.,
Southfield, Bible exibit,
Jan. 15 through Feb. 11,
354-2343.

Hill Auditorium, Ann
Arbor, Detroit Chamber
Winds, 8 p.m. Thursday,
free, 851-8329.

THE ART CENTER

PARK WEST GALLERY

125 Macomb Pl., Mount
Clemens, Child-Play Figure
Series by Daniel Keller,

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan