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January 08, 1988 - Image 28

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1988-01-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I CLOSE-UP

JEWELRY APPRAISALS

At Very Reasonable Prices

Call For An Appointment

30400 Telegraph Road
Suite 134
Birmingham, MI 48010
(313) 642-5575

tall

FINE JEWELERS

established 1919 A„,

GEM/DIAMOND SPECIALIST

JANUARY FUR
SELLEA-BRATION

MALTER
FURS

30% to 60%

REDUCTIONS

M LTER

4e/tie— rlz

OF HARVARD ROW
2174 2 W. 11 MILE RD,
SOUTHFIELD
SALE ENDS JAN. 30, 1988
358-0850

INTRODUCTORY
VISIT

• NO MEMBERSHIP
REQUIRED

• WITH APPOINTMENT
ONLY

• WITH COUPON ONLY

New Clients Only

Call for your free appointment

L

28

626 - 4442

FRIDAY, JANUARY 8, 1988

Continued from Page 26

casual
living
modes

contemporary
• furniture
• lighting
• wall decor
• gifts
• interiors

ALL '87 FURS
MUST BE SOLD.

Lose inches
with
body tonin
FR

West Of Woodward

Doily 10:00-5:30
Thurs. 10:00-8:30
Sat. 10: 00-5: 00

AWARDED CERTIFICATE BY GIA
IN GRADING AND EVALUATION

AT

I

Contemporary
accessories
for over
34 years

544.1711

22961 Woodward, Ferndale, MI

SPECIAL

2
FREE

VISITS WITH
PURCHASE OF
10 VISITS

7315 ORCHARD LAKE RD. • WEST BLOOMFIELD

BEHIND I BROWSE BOOKSTORE

626.4442

futureshape

Chuck Berg at his store in Soquel. His father owned a store of the same
name on Michigan Avenue at Livernois.

in San Mateo, he felt like a
Californian, but the move
south has given Detroit an
"almost other-world quality"
as he thinks more about his
long-ago association with the
city.
Could any of these Califor-
nians move back to Detroit?
Salle doubts if he'd ever make
the move, and Norm Wexler
would rather not. Ellie
Greenberg is far more ada-
ment: "From San Francisco?"
she laughs, "Never!" but Lew
Weinstein is more cautious as
he smiles broadly, "I'll never
say never." Leah Chafetz
would never "leave
something that's a joy
forever," while Al Stillman
hesitates for a brief moment.
"It's funny. One time I
thought about it. Now I don't
think so." Sally Harvey is
open for the right job oppor-
tunity under her conditions.
"I'd certainly go there if there
was a good reason," she
states, "but I'm not going to
make any effort.
Chuck Berg doesn't think
he'd move back, but if he had
the money, he'd spend a
month a year in Detroit,
visiting family and friends.
Each time he goes back, peo-
ple make him feel at home, he
says. "It's like a community
you never left. I don't care
how long you've been gone."
At 33, Liz Smith envisions
herself back in Detroit one
day. "I'm sure I'll live there in
my 70s when I'm a widow, liv-
ing with my sister," she pro-
jects. "And that's the way it's
going to be, and thank God for
it. The one thing about
Detroit is it doesn't really
change, even if you leave."
I've left "permanently" for
Northern California three
times — in 1960, 1969 and in
1986, — each time trying to
find the elusive "it" I couldn't
find in Detroit. There's a
fascinating, almost mystical
attraction for Detroiters who

have visited or lived in the
area for a while, but always
return to Michigan.
Harvey Sherman was one of
those. The Southfield teacher
made numerous trips to the
Bay Area over a 20-year
period for vacations, stopovers
on his way across the Pacific,
for a one-year sabbatical and,
after he learned he had
cancer, to Stanford's Medical
Center to search for a cure.
Just before he died, in April
1986, when I told him that I
had taken a position as head

"I'm sure I'll live
there in my 70s
when I'm a widow,
living with my
sister . . . Detroit
doesn't really
change, even if
you leave:'

of the magazine journalism
program at San Jose State, he
once again regretted that he
had never made a permanent
move to what he considered
America's utopia.
Those who migrated west
are not necessarily happier
than those who stayed in
Detroit. Many ex-Detroiters
hold onto part of their
hometown connection:
through visits, phone calls,
letters, informal get togethers
with others in the area, when
Detroiters pass through, or
when they think about their
yesterdays on a mild winter's
day.
Even though they now
reside in Northern California,
there's an important part of
their lives and fond memories
that took place in Detroit's
Jewish community,
somewhere west of Wood-
ward. ❑

Former Detroiter Harvey Gotliffe
lives in San Mateo.

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