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January 08, 1988 - Image 20

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1988-01-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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20

FRIDAY, JANUARY 8, 1988

NEWS

Deportations

Continued from Page 18

should reject the American
advice," said Haaretz, "and
America should appreciate
Israel's motives for rejecting
their advice — not only as pro-
ponents of cost-effectiveness
but also as a nation concern-
ed with the enforcement of
law and order."
Another
independent
Hebrew-language daily,
Maariv, asked how the United
States came to exert pressure
on Israel to refrain from en-
forcing measures that Israel
considers vital to its security.
Washington, noted the
paper, did not initiate the
move when the disturbances
began, but "was pushed into
it by public opinion."
"No one proposes that
Israel confine itself to
measures that are acceptable
to the State Department or to
major columnists in the inter-
national media," said the
paper, "but Israel should bear
in mind that disregard for
both pressure and advice car-
ries a price which it should be
prepared to pay."
The Histadrut labor federa-
tion daily Davar, however,
sounded a discordant note
when it said that while expul-
sions were effective in the
short term, they also served
to make martyrs of deported
Palestinians.
"Washington's public reser-
vations over deportations are
also difficult to dismiss," it
said, "since they are based on
human rights considerations
and on proper legal
procedure.
"The Americans recently
decided to deport criminal —
not political — Cuban
refugees back to their country
of origin, but the situation is
reversed in the Palestinian
case, and Israel's claims are
hardly convincing."
According to Davar, the pro-
blems presented by the oc-
cupied territories are complex
and challenging, "and the ap-
parently easy and available
option of deportation solves
nothing.
"It is better?' added the
paper, "to devote our mental
energy and moral courage to
attempts at establishing a
dialogue with moderate
Arabs — Palestinians and
others."
Meanwhile, a rift appears to
be developing between
Israel's Foreign Ministry,
which is concerned with the
diplomatic fall-out of the
move, and the Defense
Ministry, which appears
determined to go ahead with
the deportations.
According to a report in
Ma'ariv, the Foreign Ministry
had asked the Defense
Ministry to supply documen-
tation of the alleged misdeeds

of the deportees so that Israeli
diplomats abroad can justify
the action to their host
governments and to the
media.
According to a leading
Israeli defense analyst, Ze'ev
Schiff, the Foreign Ministry is
the only component of the na-
tional unity government to
have expressed reservations
about the move.
Senior Foreign Ministry of-
ficials have pointed out that
as well as incurring the wrath
of Washington, Israel is like-
ly to have to pay an additional
price for the expulsions:
economic sanctions by the
European Community.
There is also concern that if
the deportations go ahead,
President Hosni Mubarak of
Egypt may encounter over-
whelming pressure — both in-
ternally and from other Arab
states — to take some
demonstrative action against
Israel.
According to some observ-
ers, reactions in Cairo to the
recent wave of Palestinian
unrest is even stronger than
it was during the Lebanon
war, and Mubarak may be
compelled to contemplate a
complete break in diplomatic
relations with Israel.
"The issue," noted Ze'ev
Schiff, "has now become a
matter of prestige, with Israel
seeking to prove that it is in-
dependent in making deci-
sions on matters of national
security?'

Labor Bullish
On Deportations

1bl Aviv (JTA) — More
Palestinians by far were
deported from the ad-
ministered territories by
Labor Party defense
ministers than by their Likud
counterparts, according to a
review of deportations during
the past 20 years, published
Monday in Maariv.
Moshe Dayan deported 850
during his tenure as defense
minister in Labor-led govern-
ments from 1967-1974.
Shimon Peres, as defense
minister from 1974-1977,
ordered three deportations.
The current defense
minister, Laborite Yitzhak
Rabin, has deported 19
Palestinians since 1984 and
ordered nine more deported
Sunday. Three other cases are
being processed for possible
deportation.
In contrast, Ezer Weizman,
as defense minister in the
first Likud administration
from 1977 to 1980, ordered
four deportations. His Likud
successors, Ariel Sharon and
Moshe Arens, ordered none
during their combined tenure
from 1980 to 1984.

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