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January 01, 1988 - Image 60

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1988-01-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Low Membership Rates
01 -40

FEELING GOOD

Keeping Baby Safe

Continued from preceding page

GYM

27853 ORCHARD LAKE
FARMINGTON HILLS, MICHIGAN 48018

OLYMPIC WEIGHT * STREAMLINE MACHINES
SHOWERS * NUTRITIONAL PRODUCTS

Supervised
Training and Nutritional Programs

ONE FREE
VISIT

Good with this ad only

HOURS:

Monday thru Friday
6 A.M. to 12 Midnight
Saturday
9:00 A.M. to 8:00 P.M.
Sunday
9:00 A.M. to 3:00 P.M.

FOR MEMBERSHIP INFORMATION

CALL (313) 553-6144

Gym Owners: Jill 8c Larry Amsel

CAN'T SLEEP?

Problems falling and staying asleep are common,
here are some helpful tips from the experts:

1. Sleep as much as needed to feel
refreshed and healthy during the
following day, but not more.
2. Keep the amount of time in bed
awake to a minimum. Staying in
bed long periods of time disrupts
sleep.
3. You should get up at the same
time every morning, regardless of
what time you go to sleep. This
leads to regular times of falling
asleep.
4. A steady daily amount of exer-
cise probably deepens sleep. Oc-
casional exercise does not
necessarily improve sleep the
following night.
5. Occasional loud noises (eg, air-
craft flyovers) disturb sleep even
in people who are not awakened
by noises and cannot remember
them in the morning. Sound-
proofing bedrooms may help
those who must sleep close to
noise.

Excessively warm or cold rooms
disturb sleep. Keep the
temperature between 65 and 72
degrees (F).
7. Hunger may disturb sleep; a light
snack may help sleep.
8. Caffeine in the evening disturbs
sleep, even in those who feel it
does not. One should avoid cof-
fee, tea, or cola drinks after
lunch.
9. Alcohol helps tense people fall
asleep more easily, but the ensu-
ing sleep is then fragmented and
poor in quality.
10. People who feel angry and
frustrated because they cannot
sleep should not try harder and
harder to fall asleep. They should
turn on the light and do
something different.
11. Cigar or cigarette smoking
(nicotine) disturbs sleep.

6.

COUPON

Name:

Address:

Zip:

Yes, please send me free infor-
mation on getting better sleep.

16-F

FRIDAY, JANUARY 1, 1988

SLEEP ASSOCIATES OF
MICHIGAN, P.C.

25811 W. TWELVE MILE ROAD

350-2722

STEVEN E. NEWMAN, M.D.
HARVEY W. ORGANEK, M.D.
STEVEN E. MILLER, P.A.C.

"The basic fears are panic-
ing and not knowing what to
do for the child," says Meren-
stein. "We teach parents that
they themselves can do a lot,
and that they themselves
have to take the first steps"
in an emergency.
Pediatrician Howard Klein
believes programs such as
Baby-Life are worthwhile.
"Many parents lack hands-on
information" about emergen-
cy baby care, says Dr. Klein.
Parents may never need to
perform CPR on their baby
but they should know how in
case of emergency, he says.
One mother who took the
class when it was offered
last summer says that she
learned a lot. After attending
Baby-Life, not only did Bar-
bara Lebson stop feeding her
eleven-month old baby bread,
but she also became more
careful with common objects
like toothpaste tops (they're
easy for babies to choke on).
"Baby-Life made me more
conscious of the dangers",
says Lebson. Lebson's hus-
band, an internal medicine

physician, and her babysitter
also attended the class.
Mothers, fathers, grand-
parents, babysitters, even ten-
year-old siblings attend Baby-
Life, notes Merenstein. But
fathers find the class par-
ticularly interesting, says
Merenstein, perhaps because
"Baby-Life gives fathers a
way to take responsibility"
for their babies.

"We had one father who
told us afterwards that he
was fully prepared to fall
asleep (during the class), but
that he didn't even blink his
eyes," he says.

The four-hour long class
costs $45 per person. Re-
fresher courses are free, and
parents may attend them as
many times as they want. A
Baby-Life class will be held in
West Bloomfield at the
Jewish Community Center
on February 18, from 6:30 to
10:30 p.m. For information,
contact Jo Greene at the JCC,
661-1000 ext. 344 or 346. For
more information call Baby-
Life at (212) 744-0805. ❑

Electronic Device
Helps The Elderly

The most it can do is save
lives. The least it can do is
give peace of mind.
Lifeguard, an electronic
communication system, pro-
vides emergency assistance at
the touch of a button for
senior or disabled citizens
who are living alone.
The system consists of a
wireless pendant transmitter
that's worn around the neck
and a base unit about the size
of a cable television box that
attaches to the telephone.
When the button on the pen-
dant is pushed, an alarm is
activated on the computer
monitor at Meda-Care Am-
bulance Service in Dearborn.
"Although the monitor is in
Dearborn, we are networked
with several other ambulance
services throughout
Michigan. This insures the
quickest possible response
time," said Dan Hryczyk of
Meda-Care. "When the but-
ton is pushed, then Meda-
Care will telephone up to five
previously designated
emergency contacts — usual-
ly family members or
neighbors. If necessary we
will immediately dispatch
emergency medical personnel
to the home, although, we
don't charge for the am-
bulance run if there is no
transport."
Mrs. Rozelle Rochelle of
Pontiac has had to use the
system a number of times.
"My husband became ill and

needed help. When I saw
what was happening, I had a
light stroke and couldn't
speak. When I tried to talk for
him, my words would come up
all garbled. I pushed the but-
ton and when the ambulance
arrived, they took both of us
to the hospital."
"We are seeing an in-
creasing number of people us-
ing our service," said Jim
Bellinson, president of
Lifeguard. When we first
began, three years ago, most
people had not heard of such
a system. Now, as doctors,
discharge planners, and social
workers become more ac-
quainted with the service,
they are recommending it
more often. Some people use
Lifeguard because they have
it, while others use it for
peace of mind for themselves
and family members."
Although anyone can pur-
chase or rent a lifeguard unit,
several philanthropic
organizations such as the
Lions Club, Kiwanis and local
councils on aging have set up
programs in other states to
provide emergency response
systems to those not able to
pay.
In southeastern Michigan,
units can be ordered from
Lifeguard Systems at
644-8580. Samaritan
Hospital in Detroit also
makes the units available to
their patients.

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