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January 01, 1988 - Image 20

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1988-01-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Berries 'n Bon Bons

ENJOY NEW YEAR'S EVE
AND JANUARY 1ST FOOTBALL WITH
OUR FABULOUS CONFECTION TRAYS.

I NEWS I

,r β€žro si 106$

p

Cee

β€” ALL OCCASION GIFT BASKETS & TRAYS β€”
21711 W. 10 Mile
LOCAL & NATIONWIDE DELIVERY
Suite 122
HOLIDAY ORDERS
Southfield, MI 48075 NOW BEING TAKEN 351-4362

Ethiopians

Continued from preceding page

181 S. Woodward Ave.
Birmingham, MI 48011

642-1690

SUGAR FREE & KOSHER UPON REQUEST

Woolf Roofing & Maintenance Inc.

A Third Generation Roofing Family in Detroit

Commercial & Industrial Flat Roofs
Single-Ply and Built-up Systems

Member
National Roofing
Contractors
Association

Call Scott or Roy Woolf
for free inspections

18161 W. 13 Mile Rd.
in Southfield
646-2452

WE S HI P

GIFTS

IF YOU WISH WE'LL PACKAGE THEM TOO!

No long lines =courteous employees
and extended hours. Next day service
available. We handle anything from
1 to 1,000 pounds and we ship
furniture too.

.

Easy shipping at the

Pa ckaging

The shipper that does the packing, too!

Birmingham

Southfield

W. Bloomfield

2523 W. Maple
(At Cranbrook)

26087 W. 12 Mile
(12 High Plaza)

6453 Farmington Rd.
(At Maple Rd.)

433-3070

352-8955

855-5822

Additional Holiday Location in the
Orchard Mall (Orchard Lake at Maple)

20

FRIDAY, JANUARY 1, 1988

E-]

Relig ious News Service

5-15 Year Warranties
FULLY INSURED

Famine victims wait outside a relief center during the 1984 drought.
Another such disaster is said to be imminent.

Ethiopian Jews have
migrated to the Ethiopian
capital of Addis Ababa, where
there is little housing and few
ways of making a living, Re-
cant said.
Activists have been unable
to sway the Ethiopian govern-
ment to consider the renewed
emigration of Ethiopian Jews,
even as a way of relieving the
government's burden of aid.
In a recent news conference in
Washington, for example,
Kassa Kebede, Ethiopia's am-
bassador to the United Na-
tions in Geneva, repeated
Ethiopian government claims
that Operation Moses was a
"forcible abduction," and that
religion is not a cause for
Ethiopians to be allowed to
leave.
According to the Near East
Report, a Washington-based
newsletter that reported
Kebede's comments, a
meeting on the subject at the
United Nations in September
between Shimon Peres,
Israel's foreign minister, and
his Ethiopian counterpart
was "unsatisfactory."
Recant of AAEJ feels that
the donor countries that are
making up the bulk of
Ethiopia's shortfall can
pressure Mengistu to allow
the emigration of Jews to
continue.
"Donor nations should
bring up the fact (to the
Ethiopians) that 'if you allow
some people to leave it would
be easier for us to continue
giving aid'," said Recant.

International donors have
made commitments to supply
582,000 tons of relief food, ac-
cording to Kassis. Earlier this
month, AID pledged 115,000
additional tons of food, bring-
ing the agency's total commit-
ment to 272,000 tons.
Meantime, private
volunteer organizations such
as JDC and the Boston-based
American Jewish World Ser-
vice are continuing to provide
relief and development
assistance to Ethiopia on a
non-sectarian basis.
During the Interfaith
Hunger Appeal mission,
JDC's Cooperstock met with
Berhanu Jambare, chief of
Ethiopia's Relief and
Rehabilitation Commission,
who reiterated the govern-
ment's support for JDC's
various agricultural and
public health projects in
Gondar.
The fortunes of all Ethio-
pians, however, may lie in the
generosity of the donor com-
munity. Relief officials agree
that improved monitoring so
far has staved off disaster and
that international com-
mitments should be sufficient
for the first few months of
1988.
Beyond that, officials are
concerned that individual
donors respond more quickly
than they did three years ago.
As the Interfaith Hunger Ap-
peal's Coll explained, "We
hope people will respond
before they see the swollen
bellies on TV."

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