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December 04, 1987 - Image 36

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1987-12-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

INSIDE WASHINGTON

GET GLAMOROUS, OUTRAGEOUS
— JUST SIMPLY BEAUTIFUL -

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Now Is Your Chance To Have It AIII
WELCOME SHERYL
AILS ETC
AT HER NEW LOCATION

OFF ON
$500 FULL NAIL
EXTENSIONS

Claymore Building
Suite 124

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with coupon Exp. 12-30.87

I AM A JEW BECAUSE
BELIEFS IN CONFLICT?

WEDNESDAY, DEC. 9

7:45 P.M. —
UNITED HEBREW
SCHOOLS/MIDRASHA

21550 W. 12 Mile/Southfield

Chair and Moderator

LAUREN LISS

featuring panelists

BARBARA COOK

DR. ZVI GITELMAN

Conservative

Orthodox

MIRIAM JERRIS

WALTER SHAPERO

Secular

Reform

A community forum to discuss issues that
divide and unite the branches of Judaism.
Sponsored by the Detroit chapter of The
American Jewish Committee.

The following issues will be discussed:
1. What are the current practices and trends in
the movements of Judaism and where are they
heading us as a Jewish community?
2. What do we have in common with other Jews
and what sets us apart?
3. What will our children and grandchildren have
in common as Jews?

Religious polarization is one of the most serious internal
problems facing American Jews today. There have always
been differences of opinion among Jews, but now there
seems to be a new and dangerous tone of incivility that
threatens a breakdown in communication.

A group of lay people active in American Jewish communal
and religious life have been meeting together over the past
year under the auspices of the Detroit chapter of AJC.
Their respective affiliations reflect the diversity of contem-
porary Judaism — Orthodoxy, Conservative, Reform and
Secular. They all feel a common sense of Jewishness and
an abiding commitment to Jewish continuity, Jewish
spiritual and ethical values and Jewish unity.

The American Jewish Committee has developed an intra
Jewish Dialogue which attempts to depolarize Jewish life
by facilitating contact and discussion through a public
forum between all branches of the Jewish community. You
are invited to listen to these four representatives and par-
ticipate in an open forum on Jewish belief.

NO CHARGE

AMP

/1111P•111

_ 34 _

FRIDAY,

PUBLIC INVITED

THE AMERICAN JEWISH COMMITTEE
DETROIT CHAPTER

DECEMBER 4, 1987

White House Under Pressure
To Keep Rights On Agenda

JAMES DAVID BESSER

Washington Correspondent

A

s the meeting be-
tween Soviet leader
Mikhail Gorbachev
and President Reagan ap-
proaches, there has been a
wave of quiet but persistent
pressure on the Administra-
tion to keep human rights at
the forefront of the summit
agenda. A good part of this
pressure has come from Con-
gress — and surprisingly,
these efforts have been made
without the political grand-
standing that tends to
characterize congressional in-
volvement in the Soviet-U.S.
dialogue.
"If there is an issue right
now in the House, it's the
issue of human rights as a
part of the summit," said an
analyst for a congressional
committee dealing with the
Middle East. "There is a
strong feeling here that
human rights should be a
basic part of the discussion.
There is a lot of contact with
people in the Administration;
members are sending strong
signals to the Administration
not to let this component of
the summit get overlooked in
the euphoria over an arms
pact."
According to this source,
there is also a lingering
frustration over how the Ad-
ministration . communicated
the results of earlier human
rights discussions. Before the
preliminary meetings be-
tween Secretary of State
Shultz and Soviet Foreign
Minister Shevardnadze
earlier in the year, there was
much talk from the Adminis-
tration about the importance
of human rights issues in the
discussions. But later, several
key members of Congress, in-
cluding Rep. Benjamin
Gilman (R-NY), privately ex-
pressed their frustration that
few specifics were forthcom-
ing about how the two leaders
dealt with these complex
issues.
Congressional interest in
the mobilization has been
fueled by political legwork on
the part of the Soviet Jewry
organizations. "We've con-
tacted every House and
Senate office by letter and by
phone," said Mark Levin,
Washington representative of
the National Conference on
Soviet Jewry (NCSJ). "All of
the groups have been briefing
people on the Hill. There has
also been a lot of activity by
the Congressional Coalition

Ronald Reagan and Mikhail Gorbachev in Reykjavik, Iceland in October
1986. Will the president press for human rights?

for Soviet Jews, a group in
which Sens. Sarbanes and
Lugar, and Reps. Kemp and
Stokes have been very active!'
Levin emphasized the re-
markable unity that has
characterized the mobiliza-
tion planning process. "There
have been problems with
things like deciding who
would speak, who would sit
on the stage, that sort of
thing. We're trying to cover
all the bases, in terms of
ideology; we want to show
that this is a unique coalition,
that everyone from a Ken-
nedy to a Kemp is involved.
It's a very complex setup. But
I've been surprised at how
well people with very dif-
ferent viewpoints have
worked together for a com-
mon goal!'
On the Hill, there seems to
be a growing sense that the
summit may produce signifi-
cant results in the human
rights area. "I personally feel
that while the summit will
focus on arms control, there
will also be significance in
terms of regional and human
rights issues," said a House
staffer who has worked
regularly with Soviet Jewry
groups. "Among the profes-
sionals on the Hill, there's a
feeling that there may be
some real progress on these
issues. I think people may be
surprised."
But Soviet Jewry groups
cautioned against inflated ex-
pectations — and against see-
ing the Mobilization as the
culmination of the Soviet
Jewry movement. "It's impor-
tant that we start thinking
about where we go after the
summit," warned Mark
Levin. "After it's over, the

balloon will be stretched just
about as far as it will go, in
terms of energy and emotion.
It will be up to us to translate
all that into a continuing
momentum that will keep on
going until the basic issues
facing Soviet Jews are re-
solved."

Gorbachev
Rejects More
Emigration

Washington — Soviet leader
Mikhail Gorbachev rejected
increased emigration of
Soviet Jews and questioned
the motives of the United
States in its campaign for
Soviet Jewish emigration.
Gorbachev, in an interview
with NBC-TV News last Mon-
day,
Gorbachev said of the
United States campaign on
behalf of Soviet Jews, "What
they're organizing is a brain
drain. And of course we're
protecting ourselves. That's
No. 1. Then, secondly, we will
never accept a condition when
the people are being exhorted
from outside to leave their
country."
The pre-summit interview
was taped in Moscow. Gor-
bachev was asked specifically
about the 4000 Soviet Jews
whose visas have been de-
layed for a long time. He
answered that "right now we
have among those who have
not received permission only
those who cannot leave
because of state security
reasons. There are no other
reasons,"

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