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December 04, 1987 - Image 12

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1987-12-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I

Berries 'n Bon Bons!

ATTENTION: PARENTS OF COLLEGE STUDENTS!

I

-

Olhce .

Supply Center

Send a survival kit full of
love and noshes from home.

Sunday March

— ALL OCCASION GIFT BASKETS & TRAYS —
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LOCAL & NATIONWIDE DELIVERY
Suite 122
Southfield, MI 48075
351-4362

Continued from Page 1

v=

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NEWS

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Inside Franklin Savings Centre

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President Reagan meets on Nov. 23 with leaders of the Washington
demonstration including, from left, Jerry Goodman, Yuli Edelstein and
Morris Abram.

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12

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 4, 1987

Soviet Jewry. In a major
deviation from all previous
summits, this meeting's
agenda includes human
rights and Soviet Jewry
(along with such expected,
almost traditional topics as
arms control, bilateral rela-
tions and regional conflicts).
Also, the Soviets are ob-
viously reassessing their
emigration policies regarding
Jews. The 912 Soviet Jews
who came westward in Oc-
tober may have been a frac-
tion of the 4,200 Jews who
emigrated monthly in 1979,
but it was more than were
allowed to leave during all of
last year.
The rally, say its backers,
will amplify Administration
insistence that U.S. concern
about Soviet Jews is neither
ephemeral nor parochial. In a
sense, the event will rein-
vigorate an issue which has
been prominent in the U.S.
since the mid-1970s.
And with backing from ma-
jor labor, church and civil
rights groups, the rally will
also demonstrate that con-
cern about Soviet Jewry ex-
tends beyond the Jewish com-
munity.
Soviet leaders' sensitivity
to Soviet Jewry demonstra-
tions in the West was evident,
said David Harris, the rally's
national coordinator, by
Kremlin efforts to "mute"
such rallies when Gorbachev
visited Paris in October, 1985.
The Soviets reportedly even
tried to enlist the aid of an in-
ternational Jewish organiza-
tion in dissuading the French
demonstrators.
"Clearly, for me," said Har-
ris, "the message is that a na-
tion that is trying to gain
respectability in the interna-
tional community cannot af-
ford such embarrassments."
Harris compared the rally
to other pivotal, potentially
redemptive moments in con-
temporary Jewish history:
the rally for European Jewry
at Madison Square Garden in

December 1940; the birth of
Israel in May, 1948; the
Mideast wars of 1967 and
1973; Operation Moses in
November, 1984.
"Each demanded our atten-
tion," said Harris. "Each
challenged us to make a snap
decision — to become a par-
ticipant or remain a
bystander. Each, in hindsight,
perhaps caused us to judge
ourselves. Did we recognize
the significance of the event
at the time? Did we respond
immediately? Did we do all
that we could have done to
mobilize interest and support
from those around us?"
Among the rally's specific
goals:

• The "systematic, sustain-
ed and predictable emigra-
tion" of those Soviet Jews who
wish to leave the USSR. This
would take the spotlight from
individual prominent Jewish
refuseniks (such as the
recently released Natan
Sharansky and Ida Nudel)
and move to center stage all
400,000 or so Soviet Jews who
have either applied for
emigration or received invita-
tions from Israel to
immigrate.
• Reviewing applications
for exit visas within a
"reasonable" amount of time
rather than the current in-
definite review period.
• Eliminating the parental
approval requirement for
adults applying for emigra-
tion.
• Instituting a prescribed
length of time during which
those Soviet citizens with
"state secrets" cannot
emigrate.
• According those Jews re-
maining in the USSR the
same rights and privileges as
other Soviet minorities and
ethnic groups.
While few would disagree
with these goals, several
Jewish spokesmen contend
that the rally organizers —
and the Reagan Administra-
tion — have taken a timorous

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