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November 27, 1987 - Image 52

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1987-11-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

NEWS

rENI3Y-6TEIN 553-9966 Talent Agency
WE'RE PLAYING YOUR SONG!

JERRY FENBY
TIM HEWITT & FEELINGS
PERFECT BLEND
RENDEZVOUS
INNOVATION
LOVING CUP
ROMANCE
MIRAGE
WHITE LACE
THE RITZ
WILMOT
RARE BLEND

ERIC HARRIS, D.J.
FENBY-CARR
GOLD TONES, D.J.
SHELBY LEE
RED GARTER BAND
ERIC FREUDIGMAN
SUN MESSENGERS
CARL RYDING
TRINIDAD STEEL BAND
SPECIAL AFFECTS
MARIACHI BAND
GEORGE BENSON JAZZ
AUSTIN-MORO BIG BAND GAMUT 50'S BAND
1920'S SOCIETY ORCHESTRA
BOB DURANT BIG BAND
NEW REFORMATION DIXIELAND
SOIREE-FLUTE/GUITAR
CARICATURISTS
CLASSIC TOUCH
CLOWNS/MIMES
ASSOCIATES IN SOUND
MAGICIANS/COMICS
JAY VALLE

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52

FRIDAY, NOV. 27, 1987

ADL To Continue
Anti-Quota Position

New York (JTA) — The Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith will continue to argue
against quotas and "preferen-
tial" treatment in the work
place based on race, gender or
ethnicity, despite recent
amendments to its longstan-
ding policy of opposition. Ac-
cording to ADL officials here
last week, recent actions
taken by the agency's Na-
tional Executive Committee
represent only "modifica-
tions" of the organization's
basic opposition to quotas as
a means of ensuring equal
opportunity.
The group will continue to
support "non-preferential" af-
firmative action plans, which
call for programming other
than "setting aside" a set
number of positions for
members of a particular
minority group or gender.
Two resolutions amending
ADL's affirmative action

policy were adopted at a
meeting of the agency's Na-
tional Executive Committee
meeting.
One resolution says that
court-ordered preferential
relief, which ADL traditional-
ly has opposed, is appropriate
under certain limited condi-
tions. These include cases
where there has been a long
history of "systematic and
egregious discrimination"
and where training, recruit-
ment and other "non-
preferential" remedies have
been unsuccessful.

A second resolution says
that in situations where there
is a "substantially
segregated" workplace, the
ADL will uphold a private
sector employer's considera-
tion of race, gender or ethnici-
ty as one factor in choosing
among equally qualified ap-
plicants.

Israelis Debate Effects
Of Arab Summit Meeting

Jerusalem (JTA) — Political
debate in Israel last week
focussed on the recent Arab
summit meeting and its
possible effects on the Middle
East peace process.
Foreign Minister Shimon
Peres and other Labor Party
spokesmen argued that the
sumrait, hosted in Amman by
King Hussein, provided a
rare opportunity to move
toward Arablsraeli peace
negotiations through an in-
ternational conference.
This assessment stems from
the apparent victory of the
moderate Arab states over
the hard-liners, resulting in
the rehabilitation of Egypt's
position in the Arab world.
All but three Arab states
broke off relations with
Egypt, the largest of Arab
states, on the heels of its 1979
peace treaty with Israel.
The Amman summit lifted
the ban on relations, and
seven Arab countries resum-
ed full diplomatic ties with
Egypt since the summit end-
ed — Bahrain, Kuwait, Iraq,
Morocco, United Arab
Emirates, Yemen and the
latest and most important,
oil-rich Saudi Arabia.
Likud leadership takes a
diametrically opposed view.
Michael Eitan, speaking for
the party in a Knesset debate,
contended that the reconcilia-
tion with Egypt was just
another stage in the Arab

struggle to eradicate Israel.
He noted that the summit
reiterated all of the United
Nations resolutions favoring
the Palestinians, including
the Nov. 29, 1947 partition
resolution. According to
Eitan, that in itself is suffi-
cient to eliminate Hussein as
a serious negotiating partner.
And the summit went on to
re-endorse - the Palestine
Liberation Organization as
an equal participant in any
future negotiations, Eitan
pointed out.

Britain Ponders
War Crimes Law

London (JTA) — The
Parliamentary War Crimes
Group is seeking to amend
the criminal justice bill to
allow suspected Nazi war
criminals living in Britain to
be put on trial here. Accord-
ing to reports last week, the
amendment is under con-
sideration by Home Secretary
Douglas Hurd. It comes on
the heels of evidence that up
to 30 war criminals settled in
Britain after World War II.
The evidence was submitted
by the Los Angeles-based
Simon Wiesenthal Center
and the Soviet Union.
So far, 16 suspects have
been traced. They are
understood to be Latvians,
Lithuanians and White Rus-

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