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November 20, 1987 - Image 90

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1987-11-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

COOKING

THE PLACE
FOR SMOKED FISH
BAGEL DELI
AND PRODUCE

We are winning.

i'ANIERICAN

SOCIETY
CANCER.

PRE•HOLIDAY SAVINGS!

60% OFF

6088 W. MAPLE AT FARMINGTON RD., West Bloomfield
Mon. thru Sat. 9 to 6
Sun. 8 to 3

ENTIRE STOCK!

851-9666

BRUCE WEISS

FINEST SMOKED FISH, DELI
AND VEGI TRAYS

-

Jewelers

26325 TWELVE MILE ROAD

IN THE MAYFAIR SHOPS
AT NORTHWESTERN HWY.
MON.—SAT. 10-5:30, THURS. 'TIL 8:30

HANDOUT NOVA LOX

353-1424

Advertising in The Jewish News Gets Results
Place Your Ad Today. Call 354 6060

-

Thanksgiving Brings
History To Dinner

GLORIA KAUFER GREENE

Special to The Jewish News

W

A HEALTHY IDEA FROM
9

FISH FILLET CREOLE

3 tablespoons
F LEISCHMANN'S
Regular Margarine
1/2 cup chopped green
pepper
1/2 cup chopped onion
1 clove garlic, crushed
1 ( 1 0-ounce) can low
sodium tomatoes,
cut up

Sweet UNSALTED

Fleischmann's

:.0..100% corn oi

In medium saucepan, over medium heat, melt 1 table-
spoon FLEISCHMANN'S Regular Margarine. Add green
pepper,
onion and garlic: cook, stirring occasionally, until
tender. Stir
in tomatoes, basil and blackpepper
uncovered, for 20 minutes. Coat fillets with flour Simmer
In large
skillet, over medium heat, melt 1 tablespoon margarine.
Add 3 fillets; cook 2 to 3 minutes on each side or until fish
flakes easily; remove and keep warm. Repeat with remain-
ing margarine and fish. To serve, arrange spinach on
serving platter; top with fish fillets. Spoon tomato
mixture over fish: garnish with lemon wedges. Makes 6
servings.

Margarine

Kosher

c



f,

.

The next time you want to make something
special, try this delicious recipe for Fish Fillet
Creole. It's made with Fleischmann'sg
Margarine so it not only tastes great, it's low in
cholesterol. Fleischmann's Margarine is made
from 100% corn oil, has 0% cholesterol and is
low in saturated fat
One bite and you'll agree: There's never
been a better time for the great taste of
Fleischrnanriss.

r
1

..



OMNI. •

I !MURMURER COUPON I EXPIRES OCTOBER 31, 1988

SAVE 15c

Fleisehmana

When you buy any package of
Fleischmann's Margarine

-

s9, FLEISCHMANN'S GIVES EVERY MEAL
A HOLIDAY FLAVOR.

836790

RETAILER One coupon per purchase of prod-
uct indicated. Any other use constitutes fraud.
Consumer to pay sales tax Void if copied,
transferred. prohibited. taxed or restricted
Good only in U.S.A., A P 0.s and F.P.O.s. We
will reimburse you for the face value plus BC
handling. provided you and the consumer
have complied with the offer terms. Cash value
1/205. NABISCO BRANDS, INC DEPT 5921
EL PASO. TEXAS 79966,
5

L

az__FRinty

1/2 teaspoon basil leaves
1/2 teaspoon ground black
pepper
6 flounder or sole fillets
(about 11/2 pounds)
3 tablespoons
all-purpose flour
3 cups fresh leaf spinach
steamed lemon wedges .

Nnv 2

29000 41015

hat has become a
nonsectarian, na-
tional holiday —
warmly embraced by Ameri-
can Jews — was supposedly
first celebrated as a brief
religious observance of
thanks by the colonists who
landed in Jamestown, Virgin-
ia in 1619.
However, our modern cele-
bration of Thanksgiving is
more likely patterned after
the feast of the Pilgrims and
Native Americans that took
place two years later in Ply-
mouth, Massachusetts. Inter-
estingly, some say that the
Pilgrims based their first
thanksgiving celebration on
the biblical holiday Sukkot.
Prayers of thanks combined
with feasting on harvest foods
are common to both fall
holidays.
The early celebrants did not
repeat their observance of
Thanksgiving yearly, but
only on an occasional basis
when the mood struck. How-
ever, by the end of the eight-
eenth century, most of New
England was celebrating an
annual Thanksgiving, albeit
on different days in different
locales. The idea was also be-
ing carried westward and
southward by New England
colonists resettling in other
areas.
In November 1789, George
Washington declared an of-
ficial day of Thanksgiving,
making it the first national
holiday to be proclaimed by
the United States govern-
ment. However, he did not set
a date for an annual celebra-
tion, and observance of the
holiday was still very much of
a haphazard affair.
In the 1830s, Sarah Josepha
Hale — a New Hampshire
widow and editor of Godey's
Lady's Book, the most widely
read woman's magazine of the
period — began to write
spirited editorials in her
magazine and letters to pro-
minent politicians expressing
the desirability of an official
annual Thanksgiving day. An

advocate of women's domestic
abilities, she wanted the
ladies to have a day to show
off their culinary talents to
the rest of the country.
In 1863, after the Union
won the Battle of Gettysburg,
President Lincoln
proclaimed a day of thanks-
giving. Hale wrote to him in-
sisting that "a uniform and
legal Thanksgiving Day be
enacted that could not be
omitted by the whim of some
future executive?' On October
3, 1863, Lincoln proclaimed
that the last Thurday in
November be observed as an
annual national Thanksgiv-
ing holiday.
By the late nineteenth cen-
tury, virtually all ties to
religious celebration on
Thanksgiving had been
gradually squeezed out by
parades, football games and,
of course, the extended
Thanksgiving dinner. In fact,
the day even took on commer-
cial connections by becoming
the unofficial beginning of
the winter shopping season.
Thus, when the last Thurs-
day of November happened to
fall on the thirtieth of the
month in 1939, President
Franklin D. Roosevelt decided
to move it up a week to allow
more time for retail purchas-
ing. Some states obliged and
some did not, bringing more
confusion and discord than
sales. As a result, in 1941,
Roosevelt signed a compro-
mise bill that officially made
Thanksgiving the fourth,
rather than the last, Thurs-
day in November. And there
it has stayed ever since.
Following are some inno-
vative ideas for a Thanksgiv-
ing dinner that are delicious
and maybe even nutritious.
Stick to small individual por-
tions, and you won't become
calorically overburdened on
this great day of feasting.

MENU

• Creamy Chicken Soup with
Apples
• Pareve Cornbread Muffins
OR
• Cranberry-Nut Muffins
• Mushroom-Brown Rice

Continued on Page 84

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