100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

The University of Michigan Library provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes. These materials may be under copyright. If you decide to use any of these materials, you are responsible for making your own legal assessment and securing any necessary permission. If you have questions about the collection, please contact the Bentley Historical Library at bentley.ref@umich.edu

November 20, 1987 - Image 82

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1987-11-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

!BEST OF EVERYTHING I

o veSCATERING TO GO!

We Do It All!
Deliver Foods To Add To Your Party!

LET US HELP YOU PLAN YOUR HOLIDAY
AFFAIR NOW . . . HOME, OFFICE OR HALL
HORS D'OEUVRES TO COMPLETE DINNERS
FOR ALL OCCASIONS

WATCH FOR RUBY D'S OPENING SOON I

Cooking Tips Help
For Turkey Day

557-1721

RESERVE NOW FOR YOUR
HOLIDAY PARTIES

OLIVERIO'S

Specializing In
New York-style Italian Cuisine
Veal, Seafood, Chicken, Steak and
Gourmet Pasta Dishes

Enjoy A Complete Dining Experience

Tuesday thru Thursday, 5 p.m. to 10 p.m.
Friday and Saturday 5 p.m. to 10:30 p.m.
Sunday 5 p.m. to 9 p.m.

Full Bar Service
Live Music Friday and Saturday

5586 Drake Road Just South of Walnut Lake Road
In The Drake-Summit Shopping Center • West Bloomfield
Reservations: 661-1920

MAKS YOUR NEVI YEAR'S EVS
NOVJ NC *T " E* "EV4
IONS
AT
Dining
RSSERV

T





Spirits

(Former Location of Dimitri's of Southfield)

25080 SOUTHFIELD RD. AT 10 MILE •

ENTRANCE IN REAR •

443-1800

Daily Hours: Monday Thru Friday 11 a.m. to 12 Mid.
Saturday 4 p.m. to 1 a.m.

Specializing In -

FRESH SEAFOOD

LIVE LOBSTER TANK

FISH CAUGHT & SERVED DAILY

Also Steaks, Chops, Veals, Etc.

COMING IN JANUARY! DANCING AND LIVE ENTERTAINMENT

Banquet Facilities For All Occasions

Available Daily

'41

• Bar Mitzvahs

• Weddings

• Showers

• Anniversaries

• Bat Mitzvahs

• Sweet 16's

• Reunions

• Confirmations r

74 _FRIDAY, NOV, 20, 1987

DANNY RASKIN

Local Columnist

W

ith Thanksgiving
just around the very
immediate corner,
Empire Kosher Foods comes
up with some important tips.
When buying a turkey,
select the right size by allow-
ing one pound of turkey for
each person being served .. .
This general rule provides
ample servings, with enough
left over for great second day
dishes and sandwiches . . .
Young turkeys range in size
from eight to 24 pounds.
There is no significant dif-
ference in quality between a
fresh turkey and a frozen one,
according to Empire. If you
prefer to shop in advance,
select a frozen turkey and
store it in the freezer until
ready to thaw and prepare .. .
Fresh turkeys are highly
perishable and should be pur-
chased no more than two days
in advance of preparation.
According to Empire, the
safest method of thawing a
frozen turkey is to remove it
from the freezer and place it
in the refrigerator prior to
preparing . . . allowing at
least one full day of refrigera-
tion for every four pounds.
A quicker method of thaw-
ing can be used if needed to
save time by placing the
unopened packaged turkey in
a large container and cover-
ing it completely with cold
water . . . To insure safe thaw-
ing, replace the water with
fresh, cold water every 30
minutes . . . Allow at least 30
minutes of thawing for every
pound of turkey when using
the cold water method.
Microwave ovens can be us-
ed for thawing, says Empire,
if the turkey is not too large
. . . just follow the recom-
mended instructions that
come with your oven.
Never thaw a turkey (or any
meat) at room temperature or
in warm water, because
bacteria will multiply rapid-
ly at warm temperatures .. .
Although cooking will
destroy many bacteria, the
risk of food poisoning in-
creases dramatically when
raw meats are allowed to sit
at warm temperatures.
When the turkey has thaw-
ed sufficiently, it requires lit-
tle preparation before cooking
. . . "Remove the neck and
giblets from the body cavity.
Wash the turkey inside and
out with cold water and drain
well. Wrap the thawed turkey
in a clean wet towel to retain
moisture until preparation

time. To prevent the spread of
bacteria, wash hands, uten-
sils and sinks thoroughly
after handling raw turkey.
"Although turkey is
delicious plain, most cooks
prefer the added flavors of
stuffing. You may prepare the
stuffing in advance, but, for
best results, turkey should
not be stuffed until the last
minute. Allow 3/4 cup of stuff-
ing for each pound of turkey.
Stuff the body cavity lightly,
because stuffing expands as it
cooks. To close the neck, fold
the neck skin over the back
and fasten with skewers,
trussing pins or clean string.
Pull the legs over the turkey
and tie them together to
secure further."
To roast, place the turkey,
breast side up, in a shallow
roasting pan . . . If basting is
desired, brush lightly with oil
before roasting . . . Basting a
whole turkey is often not
needed because cooking will
release natural juices . . .
Cover the pan with an
aluminum foil tent or a ven-
tilated lid to avoid overbrown-
ing and to reduce splattering
. . . If a browner turkey is
preferred, remove the cover 30
minutes before roasting is
finished.
Place the pan in an oven
preheated to 325 degrees .. .
A roasting time of 30 minutes
per pound is recommended,
although cooking times may
very due to differences in
ovens, how thoroughly the
turkey has thawed, and how
many times the oven door has
been opened while roasting.
The turkey has been suffi-
ciently roasted when the
"pop-up" timer is activated by
the proper temperature . . . To
test it's being done, a meat
thermometer can be used .. .
The turkey is done when the
thermometer inserted in the
thick part of the inner thigh
registers 180-185 degrees .. .
Or, you can put a long-tined
fork into the meaty part of
the thigh. If the juices run
clear, not pink, the turkey is
fully roasted.
Turkey is one of the most
nutritious meats available
because it's naturally low in
fat and high in protein . . . A
three-ounce serving of
roasted, skinless turkey pro-
vides an average of only 129
calories, with 25 grams of pro-
tein, or 56 percent of the U.S.
recommended daily
allowance . . . White breast
meat is leanest, with an
average of only two percent
fat by weight . . . Darker leg
or thigh meat averages four

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan