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November 20, 1987 - Image 29

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1987-11-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SALESMAN'S

stay I had to return to my
country of origin for two
years. I returned to Germany
and worked in the Free
Hospital in West Berlin for
two years, but I couldn't wait
to get back."
While discussing his past,
Spitz allows some smiles and
even demonstrates a hearty
laugh. He recalls how a
female companion in Israel
didn't like his Hebrew name,
Zeev. She renamed him Uri,
which accounts for the middle
initial of his name.
He met his wife Anne in
Baltimore. They have three
children. "My wife is not
Jewish but that doesn't make
me any less of a Jew," he said.
"My children were not raised
Jewish. My daughter just got
married and I was not very
happy that she married a
non-Jew."
Laughing again, Spitz said,
"But my wife assures me that
at the University of Michigan
our son is sure to find a
Jewish girl."
He has returned to Israel
once and said he would like to
go again with his youngest
son. "People think of me as
German because I have a Ger-
man name and a German ac-
cent. But I'm an American
citizen and I dearly love this
country.
"I'm not observant, but I'm
a Jew. There is no denying
that my background, upbr-
inging, and thinking are
Israeli:'
Spitz received his U.S.
medical license in 1964 and
worked as the Deputy Chief
Medical Examiner in
Baltimore until he was of-
fered the Wayne County posi-
tion. "I had been number two
in Baltimore," he remarked.
"Here I'm number one."
Under his tutelage, Spitz's
office has everything it needs.
"There are 44 people working
here," he explained. "I have to
keep on top of costs, personnel
problems, and professional
performance. I assure the ef-
ficiency of this office."
Being the boss provides
Spitz with the responsibility
he enjoys. "I like telling peo-
ple what to do:' he admits. "It
takes a certain amount of
drive to do this job. It requires
someone who has the power of
decision, as well as a scien-
tific foundation and the abili-
ty to express it. You have to be
able to be understood and be
able to communicate.
"The only thing I'm unable
to cope with is boredom. If I'm
bored I go berserk. That is
why I usually take on more
than I can handle. I like to
work hard. I work till it's com-
pleted. But I also need to play
to balance my sanity."
However, one cannot accuse

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