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November 20, 1987 - Image 18

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1987-11-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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BARRY'S
LETS RENT
IT

ATTENTION: PARENTS OF COLLEGE STUDENTS!

Send a survival kit full of
love and noshes from home.

PARTY RENTALS
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LOCAL & NATIONWIDE DELIVERY
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IN CROSSWINDS (FORMER PINE LAKE MALL)

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ANNOUNCES

The Opening of His Office
in Association with
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MEAD OWBROO K

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18

FRIDAY, NOV. 20, 1987

LOCAL NEWS

Peace Tour Seeks
Jewish Conscience

KIMBERLY LIFTON

Special to The Jewish News

hen Andy Mager
speaks of his per-
sonal campaign for
peace, he reminisces about a
family vacation to Puerto
Rico as a child.
"I woke up politically at age
six," said the self-professed ac-
tivist, who with partner
Sheila Parks is promoting
their Jewish Peace Tour this
week in the Detroit area.
"We got lost during a drive
and ended up in a slum that
was worse that anything I
had ever seen. There were
emaciated children standing
naked in the streets!"
His father wasn't too com-
forting. He told the young boy
that the whole world had
problems.
Mager, now 26, never forgot
that slum and vowed at a
young age to work toward
alleviating such problems in
the world. He has spent most
of his adult life "working for
peace," which has brought
him a short prison sentence
and great satisfaction.
"This is what I have been
called to do," Mager explain-
ed. "I will probably spend the
rest of my life promoting
peace!'
In 1985, Mager's beliefs
landed him in a federal prison
for four months when he
refused to register for the
draft and explained his ac-
tions in a letter to the Selec-
tive Service. Parks, a former
college professor, served one
year in a state prison for
trespassing at a General
Dynamics plant in Rhode
Island. Parks and a group of
anti-nuclear demonstrators
damaged three nuclear
missiles by pouring blood
upon them and spray pain-
ting their message:
"Dachau!" The group called
their message a "call to cons-
cience" and accused General
Dynamics of war crimes and
of preparing for a war of ag-
gression. Such a war, Parks
said, violates constitutional
and religious laws.
Mager, a Brown University
dropout who works part-time
as a public relation's consul-
tant for a peace group in
Syracuse, N.Y., met Parks
through a friend after they
each served their respective
sentences. And in 1986, they
launched the Jewish Peace
'Ibur, a non-profit group of two
that aims to expand and
educate others about the
threat of a nuclear Holocaust.
"We hope to stimulate

Jewish people to think,"
Mager said. "We want to act
as Jews for a more peaceful
world. Judaism says we must
help everybody. We are not
powerless to make a dif-
ference."
The duo shares thoughts on
disarmament, non-violent
resistance, civil disobedience
and being Jewish. They will
wrap up their two-week tour
of the Midwest tonight with a
lecture at Temple Kol Ami.
They spoke this week at Tem-
ple Beth El, Wayne State
University and the Universi-
ty of Michigan.
"I will not kill other peo-
ple," Mager said. "War is an
immoral way to attempt to
settle conflict and today, con-
ventional war, which can well
escalate into nuclear war,
may well be suicidal!'
Mager said his beliefs
follow the commandment:
"Thou shall not kill."
"I am a Jew and the govern-
ment told me to register. But
I could not in good conscience
register for a draft," he said.
He and Parks believe the
U.S. government should take
money designated for
military weapons an use it to
feed the world's hungry
people.
Parks, 50, of Boston, has
been a political activist for 30
years. She marched in
Washington, D.C. with civil
rights leader Martin Luther
King and has been an avid
feminist since her teen years.
"I have a sense of social
justice," Parks said. "My faith
in God gives me the courage
to move forward."
Mager and Parks call them-
selves Jewish prisoners of
conscience. Neither speaks
openly of the time served in
prison, but Mager and Parks
said they are not scared to go
back to prison for their beliefs.

AJCommittee
Has Program

The Detroit Chapter of the
American Jewish Committee
will present the second in a
series of four programs on the
theme, "Issues: Election '88"
at 8 p.m. Dec. 1 in Handleman
Hall at Tempel Beth El.
Max Green, associate direc-
tor of the White House Office
of Public Liaison, will be the
featured speaker. Douglas
Ross, Michigan Department
of Commerce director, and
Bruce Miller, attorney, will be
the panelists questioning
Green.
Green was appointed to his
position in October 1985. In

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