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November 06, 1987 - Image 16

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1987-11-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I NEWS I

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HUNG UP ABOUT
WHAT TO HANG UP?

Recall

Continued from preceding page

petitions will be reviewed
nextThursday by Oakland
County Probate Judge
Eugene Moore. If approved,
which is likely, OUST will
then need to collect at least
3,750 signatures within 90
days in order to place the
recall on a ballot.

OUST officers are confident
they will succeed in ousting
the township officials, claim-
ing to have received scores of
calls from those offering to
assist in the recall efforts.
lbwnship officials are confi-
dent they will retain their
seats.
"The recall will be over-

whelmingly rejected," said
Leib, who claims the whole
thing was instigated by "an
isolated group of people ac-
ting in a self-centered way."
The group admits their drive
was originally sparked by the
township's failure to acquire
180 acres that borders several
OUST member's homes and
turn it into a park. The land,
origninally known as the
Howard Brothers Woods, was
scheduled to be purchased by
the township but was sold to
another developer instead.
The transaction was blamed
on the parks and recreation
officials. "It wasn't our fault,"
said Leib.

Pollution: No Solution
For Walnut Lake

LILA ORBACH

Special to The Jewish News

T

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gallery

The Cure for the Blank Wall

West Bloomfield — 6223 Orchard Lake Road (In Sugar Tree) — 855-0813
Troy — 316 West 14 Mile Road (In Oakland Mall) — 585-7470
Royal Oak — 710 West 11 Mile Road — 544-1199

he splashing sounds
of swimmers and wa-
ter skiiers was
noticabley missing from West
Bloomfield's Walnut Lake
this summer and the familiar
sight of the lonely ice fisher
perched on the ice mid-winter
may be a thing of the past.
This private lake is con-
taminated. The foul stench
penetrates beyond the
beaches. White, murky water
has been seen flowing into
the lake — and no one seems
to be able to find the source.
Last summer, after high
levels of human fecal matter
and other pollutants were
discovered in the lake, the
Oakland County Health
Department ordered the
beaches closed and the lake
declared off limits to swim-
mers and other water-sport
enthusiasts.
"In five years, our lake will
be dead," said Bea Lunetta,
vice president of the Lone
Pine Beach Association. "Our
beach stinks. It smells like a
sewer. But they can't seem to
find out where the problem
is."
Even the engineering ex-
perts from consultants Pate,
Hirn & Bogue as well as
Swanson Environmental,
who were called in by the
township to head the in-
vestigations, admit they are
unable to cite a cause.
They have examined wells,
drain pipes, every bit of the
pressure main, even local
goose droppings to try and
determine how the sewage is
washing into the lake. In ad-
dition, they have washed col-
ored dye through toilets in a
dozen lake-front homes to see
if somehow there's a leak, but
so far all tests have come up

negative.
But the township isn't giv-
ing up. Having used up more
than $10,000 on the project,
last Monday the township
board allocated another
$10,000.
West Bloomfield Township
is not alone in their investiga-
tions of Walnut Lake. Of-
ficials from Oakland County
and the Department of
Natural Resources have all
gotten involved. The DNR is
expected to submit a report
on the lake's condition by the
end of the month.
A major complaint is the
lack of communication bet-
ween the investigators and
residents, who have claimed
all along that the problem
lies at the lakeshore pump
station near the Lone Pine
Beach off Inkster Rd. The
pump station has yet to be in-
spected fully by the experts.
Several residents find the
investigators' avoidance of
the pump station rather
unusual and many are claim-
ing that something fishy is
going on.

The Walnut Lake Home
Owners Association has filed
suit against the county. Some
residents, who asked to re-
main nameless, claimed the
investigators were avoiding
the pump station so as not to
implicate the county in any
way. The experts claimed they
had no relationship with the
county. However, Clerk
Dupree said the consulting
firms were originally working
with the county to investigate
the problem.
As time and money run out,
residents are getting more
and more frustrated. Said
Trustee Jeffrey Leib: "We can
put people on the moon, we
ought to be able to find out
what's wrong with the lake."

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