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October 30, 1987 - Image 14

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1987-10-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

u r r mini

1

Send it for less
at ...

At
I Ali_
14

Fruit & Gift Baskets

"Since 1940"
ALL Occasions
Nationwide Delivery

JUST CALL

ION

26087 W. 12 MILE RD.

(Just E. of Northwestern)

352-8955

CONGREGATION SHAAREY ZEDEK

is pleased to announce that
In tribute to

THE STATE OF ISRAEL

On the eve of its 40th Anniversary .. .
And in honor of

WILLIAM DAVIDSON

Recipient-Elect of Israel's Peace Medal .. .

ABC NEWS CHIEF WHITE HOUSE CORRESPONDENT

Shapiro

Continued from Page 12

structure would not have per-
mitted a Jewish president."
But Shapiro, who said he
never experienced any form of
anti-Semitism during his
time there, claims Princeton,
like all of higher education, is
changing.
Since the mid-'60s, women
were allowed to enroll.
Moreover, out of the big-three
Ivy League schools (Har-
vard, Princeton and Yale)
Princeton is the only one with
a kosher dining hall, which
accounts for the sizeable Or-
thodox community on cam-
pus. "They're becoming much
more open," Shapiro said,
noting the kosher kitchen. "It
didn't take me to come to
make that happen."
Shapiro seems to take his
historic position in stride. "I
would rather have been the
tenth Jewish president at
Princeton. But I'm very glad
to be the first."
Though fragments of anti-
Semitism may still exist
among Princeton alumni and
others, Shapiro cited it cer-
tainly isn't loud enough to
keep him away. "Had the
trustees felt that, they
wouldn't have chosen ma"
Rabbi Yedwab agreed, say-
ing, "Obviously the universi-

ty has progressed, which is
wonderful. I'm very proud of
my alma mater."
Princeton has much to be
proud of, too. Their president-
elect has put together quite a
resume of accomplishments.
He holds five honorary
degrees, he has four
daughters, he is the first
Jewish president at any of the
big-three Ivy League schools,
and has been chosen presi-
dent of two of the most
respected schools in the coun-
try. However, despite all of his
accomplishments, the thing
Shapiro is most likely to brag
about is his one grandson.
As difficult as it is for the
Shapiros to pack up and leave,
the deadline is moving ever
closer and they are no longer
able to postpone the moving
day. So, December 20, just
after commencement, they'll
load the moving van and
make their way to New
Jersey.

"We'll meet a whole new set
of people," said Vivian
Shapiro. "We'll miss our
friends. It's very difficult to
leave."
Added President Shapiro:
"I'll always root for the maize
and blue."

UHS

Continued from Page 5

SAM DONALDSON

will be the guest speaker
at the

SHAAREY ZEDEK•ISRAEL BOND DINNER

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 5th, 6:00 P.M.

at the Synagogue

For reservations and information call

14

FRIDAY, OCT 30, 1987

557-2900

that "everything is open for
discussion, both informal and
formal Jewish education," in-
cluding programs at the
Fresh Air Society, Jewish
Community Center, UHS,
other schools and
congregations.
Asked if an increase in fun-
ding for education will re-
quire changes in the alloca-
tion formula of Allied Jewish
Campaign funds, Giles
responded that "the easy
answer is, 'We'll raise more
money.' And my response is,
`We can.' " Giles expects
larger Allied Campaigns each
year and increasing endow-
ment gifts, "and the com-
munity process will deter-
mine the priorities" for these
funds.
At a United Hebrew
Schools board meeting Mon-
day evening, several
members expressed concern
over the new study. They ask-
ed Dr. Goodman to seek
strong UHS input on the com-
mittee. Bea Kreichman, ac-
ting administrator at UHS
and principal of its Adat
Shalom branch, reported
preliminary enrollment
figures of 1,000 students. Ap-
proximately half those
students are at the Adat
Shalom branch. Although the
newly-named Community

Jewish High School has an
enrollment of 159, only 20 of
the students are in the three-
days-per-week program. The
rest attend on Sundays.
Several board members
defended UHS' Allied Jewish
Campaign allocation, stating
that the $100,000 annual
maintenance costs for the
UHS building on 12 Mile —
which is used for many com-
munity meetings — and the
outreach programs of the
Midrasha College of Jewish
Studies and of UHS are rare-
ly remembered when discuss-
ing the Campaign allocation.

NEWS

Mayors Boycott

New York (JTA) — The
mayors of New York and
Boston are boycotting two
separate international con-
ferences devoted to great
cities of the world because
Jerusalem has not been
invited.
Mayor Ed Koch of New York
canceled his appearance at
the Capitals of the World
Conference, in Ottawa. And
Mayor Raymond Flynn of
Boston announced he will not
be going to the World Con-
ference of Historical Cities in
Kyoto, Japan.

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