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October 30, 1987 - Image 12

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1987-10-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

UP FRONT limmilmmiliimmimmm

casual
living
modes

Shapiro

Continued from Page 5

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12

FRIDAY, OCT. 30, 1987

ranged for upcoming
Michigan football and basket-
ball tickets as well as tickets
to other local cultural events,
to be sure to keep up with the
goings-on in Ann Arbor.
The U-M has not yet chosen
a successor to Shapiro.
U-M president emeritus
Robben Fleming will serve as
the intermediary president
until someone is chosen.
Shapiro claims to have no
idea who his successor will be.
When asked if it might be a
woman, Shapiro said only,
"Why not?"
For the slender, slightly
preppy, clean-cut president,
who invented the Michigan
Econometric Model of U.S.
Economy — considered the
standard work of economic
forcasting — and for his wife,
Vivian Shapiro, an assistant
professor of social work in U-
M's psychology department
who hopes to teach in
Princeton's Women's Study
Center, packing up their
books and other belongings
isn't going to be easy.
Monday night, prior to ad-
dressing some 150 people who
had gathered at Birmingham
Temple for the Symposium
`88 speakers series, Shapiro
and his wife spoke to The
Jewish News to discuss their
excitement and nervousness
about the upcoming move.
"Uprooting is always dif-
ficult," said the U-M presi-
dent. "Ann Arbor holds a
special place in my heart that
won't be replaced. It's a
challenge but also a great
deal of fun!'
Born in Montreal, Shapiro
was raised in what he calls a
"quite traditional" home. His
father owned Ruby Foo's, a
restaurant in the city's
suburbs, described as the
London Chop House of
Montreal.
In 1956, Shapiro, together
with his twin brother, Ber-
nard, graduated from Mon-
treal's McGill University. A
year later, his father died, and
for a short while, the Shapiro
brothers ran the restaurant.
But they sold it soon after in
order to go on with their
education. Bernard went off
to Harvard and Harold to
Princeton, where he earned
his masters degree and
doctorate.
Harold Shapiro came to
Michigan in 1964 as an assis-
tant professor of economics.
By the late 1970s he had
worked his way up to vice
president of the university.
Meanwhile, Bernard had
become the vice president at
the University of Western On-
tario in London and subse-
quently Ontario's Deputy
Minister of Education. In
1980, Harold was named

Harold Shapiro:
Leaving U-M.

president of the U-M, leading
the university through its
worst financial crisis in re-
cent history as well as last
spring's outburst of racial pro-
blems on campus.
Now he moves on to
Princeton. Though a con-
siderably smaller school
(Princeton has 7,000
students; U-M has 35,000)
and celebrated as one of the
most prestigious universities
in the nation, Shapiro said in
many ways the two schools
are easily comparable.
"They're both very big, very
powerful and with great tradi-
tion," he said. "This is a lat-
teral move, it's not up or
down!'
In other ways, however, the
schools are drastically dif-
ferent. "The key differences,"
said Shapiro, "are the fewer
professional schools at
Princeton and their greater
emphasis on undergraduate
education."
Despite Shapiro's eagerness
to begin his new post, he is
not without some hesitation.
"Anything brand new is
anxiety provoking," he said.
Princeton, which now
boasts of nearly 20 percent
Jewish representation and an
ever-expanding number of
other minorities, was rarely
thought of as the bastion of
racial tolerance, but rather an
enclave for priveledged males,
predominantly white Anglo-
Saxon Protestants. Therefore,
the choice of a Jewish presi-
dent has come as somewhat of
a surprise.
"There has been a history of
anti-Semitism at Princeton!'
said Rabbi Paul Yedwab of
lemple Israel, who graduated
from Princeton in 1979. "I
find it astounding that they
would have chosen a Jew —
and quite healthy. While I
never experienced any overt
anti-Semitism, one still had
the feeling that the power

Continued on Page 14

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