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October 30, 1987 - Image 110

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1987-10-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

COUPON

r

SINGLE LIFE

$1 00 OFF

ANY TOP 50 LP
OR CASSETTE

VALID ANYTIME

GAYNORS

SOMERSET MALL • (313) 649-9415

ORCHARD-14 SHOPPING CENTER
ORCHARD LAKE RD. & 14 MILE

1

2743 VI. BIG BEAVER RD. • TROY. MI 48084

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Personally Speaking

HOTLINE: 855 0033

M.Th Fri. 10-9. T.W.Set, 10-6. Sun. 12-5

-

SHOP...SAVE...SHOP...SAVE

WHERE: THE WAITING GAME
WHEN: FRIDAY, OCT. 30 THRU MONDAY,

Single Life is planning a feature story about couples
who are dating, engaged or married as a result of meeting
through The Jewish News People Connector Ads or the per-
sonal ads in the Jewish Singles Event Source from the Corn-
munity Network for Jewish Singles. If you are among these
couples and would like to be written up and photographed
for the story, please call News Editor Heidi Press, 354-6060,
during business hours.

NOV. 2

(Closed Sunday)

WHAT:...ALL
...MATERNITY

...CLOTHES

I MIDEAST I

OFF

0 0/ 0

(EXCLUDING HOSIERY & LINGERIE)

THE
WAITING
GAME

Applegate Square

Northwestern & Inkster • Southfield

352-9799

HOURS: MON.-SAT. 10 to 5
THURS. 10 to 8

W ANTE D
COL L EG E SHINN]]

I
I

OUTSTANDING FULL-TIME GRADUATE & UNDERGRADUATE

SUMMER EMPLOYMENT

If you are interested in a career in Jewish communal
service and are a resident of metropolitan Detroit, have we
got a deal for you!

Apply now to be a Jewish Occupational Intern at a
metropolitan Detroit Jewish Community Agency for nine
weeks this summer. Earn $1300 while you gain practical
experience in the areas of Social Work, Recreation,
Counseling, Program Development and Teaching.
Internships may be available at agencies such as: Jewish
Association for Retarded Citizens, Jewish Community Center,
Jewish Family Service, Federation Apartments, Fresh Air
Society, Jewish Home for the Aged, Jewish Vocational
Service, and the Jewish Welfare Federation.

Written applications must be received by Nov. 20. Personal
interviews will be scheduled during winter vacations.

NS

110

For an application form,
call Elaine Goldman
at Jewish Vocational Service (JVS): 559-5000.

Call today!

FRIDAY, OCT. 30, 1987

Group Hopes To Expose
Arab-Held Jews' Plight

JAMES DAVID BESSER

Washington Correspondent

ews still living in Arab
nations are victims of
one of the world's most
underreported human rights
problems, according to of-
ficials of the World Organiza-
tion of Jews from Arab Coun-
tries (WOJAC).
The group, which held its
annual convention in
Washington this week, is at-
tempting to bring the plight
of these Jews to the attention
of the American government.
At the same time, they are us-
ing the example of Jews ex-
pelled from Arab countries in
the past 40 years to refute the
claims of Palestinian refugees
for special consideration.
According to Mordechai
Ben-Porat, chairman of the
World Executive of WOJAC
and a former Knesset
member, the organization
hopes to spread the word that
there are still some 22,000
Jews in Arab countries.
"There are still Jews suffer-
ing in these countries, there
are still Jews who are not per-
mitted to leave," he said.
Included in this number,
Ben-Porat said, are 6,000
Jews living in Syria, many of
whom are are in serious
jeopardy. There are also 300
in Iraq, 1,200 in Yemen, 3,500
in Tunisia, 200 in Algeria,
12,000 in Morocco and a
single Jewish family in Libya.
This, he said, is in addition
to Jews in non-Arab Moslem
countries, including 50,000 in
Iran.
To reinforce their message,
the WOJAC convention in-
cluded a display of
photographs and documents
that graphically portrayed
the rich heritage of Jews in
Arab countries —and the
persecution that has become
a grim fact of life in recent
decades.
Ben-Porat emphasizes the
success of Israel in absorbing

j

more than a million Jews who
arrived from Arab countries
since 1948. "Israel has in-
vested more than $11 billion
to absorb these refugees, who
more often than not came to
Israel penniless," he said.
This, he argued, stands in
stark contrast to the efforts of
Arab governments in absorb-
ing Palestinian refugees.
In fact, he argued, a de fac-
to population exchange has
taken place in the Middle
East in which at least
600,000 Jews left their homes
in Arab lands for Israel, and

A de facto

population
exchange has
taken place in the
Middle East.

a similar number of Palesti-
nians left Israel for the Arab
nations. These Jews are just
as entitled to compensation
under U.N. resolution 242 as
Palestinian refugees, the
organization insists.
A continuing theme of the
conference was the demand
for compensation for posses-
sions and property left behind
by Jews in these countries.
Ben-Porat suggested that any
Israeli financial settlement
on Palestinian refugees would
take into account the vast
losses incurred by Jewish
refugees. Several speakers
suggested that these losses
justify Israeli retention of the
occupied territories.
A major part of the WOJAC
convention was a mock
tribunal presenting witnesses
of human rights abuses in
Arab countries. Jewish vic-
tims of persecution in
Baghdad, Benghazi and
Damascus described their ex-
periences under questioning
by Morris Abram, chairman
of the Conference of
Presidents, and Irwin Cotler,
past president of the Cana-

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