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October 23, 1987 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1987-10-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

POLITICS

Come Buy a Car From My DAD!
see LARRY KAPLAN

New Cars - Trucks • Used Cars - Leasing

on

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(313) 355-6414

THE UNBEATABLE DEALER

28111 Telegraph Rd. & 1-696

Across from Tel-12 Mall

Smoke And Silence In
Southfield's Elections

LILA ORBACH

UNBEATABLE DEALS
FROM THE UNBEATABLE TEAM!

Come to our showroom and see for yourself

'88 Beretta GT Shark

'87 Corvette 2 Dr. Hatchback Cpe.

Pwr. seats, visor mit, spt. handling pkg., pwr. door locks, air cond., 5.7L TPI V-8,
auto. trans., P255/50VRO 16 S/B rad., rr. defog., lift off roof, white. Stk. No. 439.

21 AVAILABLE
LIST
$32,392
DISCOUNT
—$6,892

NOW S 2 5 '500 *

'88 Cavalier Convertible

'87 Celebrity Eurosport 4 Dr. Sedan

Air cond., rr. defog., 2.5L EFI L4, auto. trans., P195/70R-14 S/B rad., AM/FM ••• ■■ ...
stereo, Eurosport equip., med. gray.

LIST
DISCOUNT

Now$9

$12,357
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20 AVAILABLE

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775* 401

--

rIT

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at 1-696

11Vrigt

420

6 or

355-1000

LOOK, SHOP, GET YOUR BEST DEAL, BUT DON'T
)14.606Airvu46( BUY UNTIL YOU SEE THE UNBEATABLE DEALER!

10 FRIDAY, OCT. 23, 1987

••■±,11.110” COWM•11.

Special to The Jewish News

T

he bumper stickers
are stuck to the cars,
the campaign signs
line the suburban streets and
the candidates have taken to
the pavement — hoping to
speak to as many local
residents as possible.
The battle for Southfield Ci-
ty Council is brewing.
Six candidates, including
four incumbents, are running
for four council seats in what
many are calling one of the
quietest elections in
Southfield City Council
history — so quiet, in fact,
many of Southfield's 80,000
residents don't even know
about the Nov. 3 Election.
"Election? What election?"
said one local woman when
asked how she's planning to
vote.
Without any proposed
amendments on the
Southfield ballot or any bur-
ning issues to highlight the
election, very few of the
56,000 registered voters are
expected to show up at the
voting booths.
"Less than 20 percent of the
registered voters will show up
to decide the fate of the City
Council and subsequently the
goings on of Southfield," said
Councilman Eli Robinson,
who's seeking his second
term. "I'm appalled. Nobody
cares. If they do care, why
don't they get out and vote
and do something about it?"
Southfield is one of 23 of the
29 Oakland County cities
holding elections next month.
But even in this relatively
quiet, odd-year general elec-
tion (too quiet, it appears,
even to hold the normal can-
didates'meeting), the voices of
the candidates are booming,
signs have been vandalized,
accusations are flying and the
mudslinging has begun.
The incumbents, Peter Cris-
tiano, Vicki Goldbaum,
Sidney Lantz and Eli Robin-
son, boast of boomtown
Southfield, a city where com-
mercialization is thriving and
residents are satisfied — a ci-
,ty, they say, that should
reelect them.
"This is the best City Coun-
cil we've had in years," said
Councilman Lantz.
"People are comfortable
with this city," said Coun-
cilman Robinson.
"The four incumbents
deserve to take their seats
again," said Councilwoman
Goldbaum.
"The present council is

working well together," said
Cristiano. "Most cities envy
Southfield."
But at least one wanna-be
City Council member,
Richard Moss, is not so quick
to praise the efforts of the
seven-member council which
this year controlled a
$62-million budget. He
claims the city's boom has
gone to bust, that the over-
commercialization has come
at the residents' expense and
that it's high time for change.
"People are unhappy with
the way things are going and
unhappy with the progess,"
said Moss, a law student and,
at 29, the youngest of all six
candidates. "The continual
thread that runs through
everything is that residents
are put to the side. The coun-
cil members are so convinced
Southfield is a wonderful
place that they're not cogni-
zant of the difficulties. There
are many improvements to be
made."
Council members are
resentful of Moss' critical
remarks.
"It doesn't take talent to
shout out problems, it takes a
lot more talent to work out
the solutions," said Coun-
cilman Robinson, who noted
that Moss has been a resident
and registered voter of
Southfield for little more than
a year (as has the other non-
incumbent contender, Henry
Palmer, a 21-year Ford
employee now working as an
administrator for Ford. per-
sonnel.) "Mr Moss is blowing
things out of proportion.
There's a lot of satisfaction."
But not according to Moss,
who says he's walked the
neighborhoods and found that
residents are concerned with
overpopulation, over-
commercialization, traffic
conjestion and the problems
of senior citizens.
For all the candidates, the
most distressing aspect of the
campaign is the vandalism.
Signs have been written on
and in many cases, stolen.
"People have tried to brew
scandals," said Coun-
cilwoman Goldbaum, who is
seeking her fourth term in of-
fice. "This campaign is not be-
ing run according to the rules
as they have in the past.
There's some underhanded,
low backstabbing happening
to each and every incumbent.
We're putting up with a lot of
nonsense and the real issues
are not being faced."
The one who has stayed out
of the crossfire the most
seems to be Palmer, who has

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