100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

The University of Michigan Library provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes. These materials may be under copyright. If you decide to use any of these materials, you are responsible for making your own legal assessment and securing any necessary permission. If you have questions about the collection, please contact the Bentley Historical Library at bentley.ref@umich.edu

October 16, 1987 - Image 76

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1987-10-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

ENTERTAINMENT

LEO MERTZ'S KOSHER
CAFE KATON

547-3581

23055 COOLIDGE • Oak Park

WE ARE KOSHER

Roll 'Em

NOT KOSHER-STYLE!!!

Continued from preceding page

DA I RY

TRAY •
5

CREAM CHEESE
• LOX
• EGGS
• SMOKED FISH
RELISHES
• SABLE
7
$
per person • BAGELS, BREAD
• VEGETABLES
AND ROLLS
• COTTAGE CHEESE to person minimum

r

11011 /6 OF

TWITH THIS COUPONT1

DAIRY

TRAY

Expires

10-23-87

Under The Supervision of the Council of Orthodox Rabbis

T coupoNT

arms

Fine Dining

OFF
50%
SECOND DINNER

WHEN DINNER OF EQUAL OR GREATER
VALUE IS PURCHASED

• Dining Room Only • Expires 10-29-87

Daily Dining Room Hours: TUES.-THURS. 5 p.m.-10 p.m.
FRI. & SAT. 5:30 p.m-10:30 p.m., SUN. 5 p.m.-9:30 p.m.

20097 W 12 MILE ROAD, SW. CORNER EVERGREEN
For Res: 353-5121
COUNTRY VILLAGE CENTER
JN
Southfield

,„sra:tagaie ,

68

FRIDAY, OCT. 16, 1987

husband,
businessman
Stanley, for 34 years.
She and Conn get work in
two ways — by submitting
bids or by coming up with
their own ideas and soliciting
for funds.
Sue Marx Films, Inc. got
the job to produce three Ses-
quicentennial spots after be-
ing asked to apply for the
work. One of the spots con-
tains original songs by Conn
as well as an original by the
legendary songwriter Irving
Berlin. He gave Marx permis-
sion to use his I Want to Go
Back to Michigan song in one
of the spots and he isn't
charging her any royalty fees,
something almost unheard of.
What does making a film
actually mean? It often
means working seven days a
week, 50-60 hours a week for
months. For one of the Ses-
quicentennial films, it meant,
first, doing the writing and
creative planning in her of-
fice, making dozens of phone
calls, for example, to line up
the freelance camera crew
and the people to be in the
film. It meant setting up a
"real" picnic for shots of peo-
ple toasting marshmallows,
climbing trees, and among
other things, having a
wonderful time. It also meant
hoping for good weather on
the day of the shoot.
Then the next step — the
editing — begins. "We have
our own equipment in our of-
fice and use a freelance editor
from Ann Arbor," Marx said.
"We make our films on a reel-
to-reel machine versus video
because we believe the results
are prettier, softer and we can
get more beautiful scenes.
Reel-to-reel is slower and
more expensive, but it's worth
it," added the member of such
organizations as the Detroit
Producers Association, the
National Academy of Televi-
sion Arts and Sciences, the
Greater Detroit Chamber of
Commerce, the National
Council of Jewish Women and
the American Jewish
Committee.
Once a film is completed, it
can be copied on video and
then released. Marx and
Conn are responsible for the
sales of the films, too. One
way they encourage sales is
by entering their films in
festivals.
This method of promotion
certainly paid off recently for
Marx, Her latest film, Young
at Heart, was selected for the
prestigious 'Telluride Film
Festival in Telluride, Cola,
over the Labor Day weekend.
It also was chosen as one of
nine U.S. entries for the il-
lustrious New York Film
Festival, which ran from Sept.
25 through Oct. 11. Marx's

Sue Marx takes an active role in film projects undertaken by her firm.

entry was shown at Alice Tul-
ly Hall at Lincoln Center on
Oct. 8.
"I hope the movie will be
picked up for national
distribution after this," added
Marx, who enjoys cooking,
entertaining and playing.
tennis.
Young at Heart is one of
Marx's favorites for a few
good reasons. It's had good
reception. Her sister, Vivian
Leberman, who also is a
regular in the film business,
helped her make- it, and the
film is about two very special
people in Marx's life. The oc-
togenarians starring in it are
her father, Louis Gothelf, and
his new wife, Reva Schwayder.
"We decided to film my dad
and Reva's story because it
was so wonderful. It is about
two people in their 80s who
met on a flight while going on
a painting trip to England in
1984. She moved into his
room the second night on the
trip. We began filming in the
winter of 1984 and stopped
when they got married in the
summer of 1986," said Marx.
The purpose of the film, she
explained, was to present a
positive portrait of older peo-
ple in general as well as the
story about two older lovers.
Marx received major funding
for Young at Heart from Sinai
Hospital and from several
other organizations.
Marx isn't one to hang her
hat and call it quits on her
most recent success. A woman
who has a visual love for life,
she has many visual goals
including the making of big-
ger and better movies.
"I hope to do a feature film
in Detroit where there is so
much talent. I'd also like to do
a multi-image show about

Detroit that would be shown
continuously in Cobo Hall.
We have a hell of a story in
Detroit to tell," she said.
Until then, she'll continue
sitting at her desk in her two-
room office, making her mark
on the local, statewide and
national film industry.



Women To See
"Young At Heart"

An opportunity to see the
nationally acclaimed film
Young at Heart awaits
members of the Jewish
Welfare Federation Business
and Professional Women's
Division, 6 p.m. Oct. 26 at the
new Radisson Plaza at Town
Center in Southfield.
Young at Heart is a tribute
to the vitality and romance of
octogenarian artists Reva
Shwayder and Louis Gothelf
— as seen through the eyes of
Gothelf's daughter, five-time
Emmy Award-winner Sue
Marx.
Marx, • Shwayder and
Gothelf will be on hand to
answer questions.
Maida Portnoy is B and P
Women's Division program
chairman, with the
assistance of Judy Frankel,
associate chairman; and
Judge Susan Moiseev, ad-
viser. Florine Mark is divi-
sion chairman. Barbara
Goldman is associate chair-
man and Linda Klein, ad-
viser. Sharon Hart is Women's
Division president, and Edie
Mittenthal is vice president.
Reservations are necessary,
and dinner is included in the
price of admission. For more
information, call Shelley
Milin at Federation,
965-3939.

.

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan