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October 16, 1987 - Image 22

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1987-10-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I ISRAEL I

JEWELRY APPRAISALS

At Very Reasonable Prices Call For An Appointment

\nal te/tCW6/1

established 19 1 9

A.1

Li FINE JEWELERS

GERVD1AMOND SPECIAUST

AWARDED CERTIFICATE BY GIA
IN GRADING AND EVALUATION

L

30400 Telegraph Road
Suite 134
Birmingham , Ml 48010
(313) 642-5575

ft.



Daily 10:00-5:30
Thurs. 10:00-8:30
Sat. 10:00-5:00

)

On A Clear Day You
Can See The Promenade

DAVID LANDAU

J

TIME FOR
GOOD
BUYS.

AT GORMAN'S FURNITURE CLEARANCE CENTER.

We offer you 40% to 70% savings every day on clearance items from all four
Gorman's stores. Customer cancellations, slightly injured merchandise, one-of-a-
kinds, floor samples...and it's all Gorman's quality furniture. Plus, we're able to
bring you special merchandise we've acquired through one-time manufacturer deals.

Gorman's Furniture Clearance Center. Quality furniture at 40% to 70% savings.
No frills. No design staff. No special orders. No holds or layaways. No extra costs.
Just good buys, four days a week.

Sectionals • Sofas/Loveseats • Chairs • Occasional Tables • Leather. Bedding
• Dining Rooms/Dinettes • Sleep sofas • Bedrooms • Wall units

Nominal charge for delivery

Phone: 357-7774
© 1987 GORMAN'S

22

FRIDAY, OCT. 16, 1987

OORMIltlt
FURNITURE
CLEARANCE
CENTER

OPEN 4 DAYS
Thurs. & Fri. Noon-9 p.m.
Sat. & Sun. Noon-6 p.m.

erusalem — One of this
city's most frequented
tourist sites is neither
an archaeological site nor a
religious shrine and is
i not
even six months old. The
Walter and Elise Haas Pro-
menade, already fondly called
"the promenade," attracts
hundreds of visitors every
day.
Built along a ridge 2.5
miles south of the Old City,
the three-block-long walkway,
commands a breathtaking
view of the Mount of Olives,
Mount Scopus, the Old City
walls and the modern city.
Of course, the view has
always existed; drivers on
their way to the suburb of
East Talpiot would peek at it
as they wound their way
along the narrow road. Or
people walking through the
woods on the steep hillside
below the United Nations
Middle East headquarters
could gaze at the historic
landscape. But only privileg-
ed visitors to the UN
building, formerly the
residence of the British High
Commissioner, could ap-
preciate the full majestic
view.
Now one can stroll along
the six-yard-wide promenade,
built next to the recently
widened and straightened
road leading to the UN
building and East Talpiot,
and see the full east-to-west
panorama.
The promenade was official-
ly opened on Jerusalem Day
last May, but rumor of the
superb view had spread long
before then. On Independence
Day, three weeks earlier,
groups of Jerusalemites
already were gathering there.
Built in the form of a
viaduct of Jerusalem stone
with a Victorian solidity
reminiscent of the Thames
and Seine embankments, it is
rarely empty. Joggers
measure out a full kilometer
from the convenient parking
lot to the end of the pro-
menade and back. Elderly
gentlemen walk briskly,
perhaps at the suggestion of
their cardiac specialists.
Courting couples sit in the
stone alcoves covered with
slated wooden roofs.
Numerous stone benches line
the walkway.
At night, when the pro-
menade is romantically lit by
wrought-iron lanterns, the
visitor can appreciate the
floodlighting of the Old City
walls and can easily spot the

bright lights above the
Western Wall.
Yet, the hour just before
sunset is the most popular
time at the promenade, when
a cool wind blows across the
ridge, even at the height of
summer. Then the Old City's
limestone walls reflect the
pink-gold evening light, and
the golden dome of the Mos-
que of Omar glints in the set-
ting sun.
The promenade is now a
"must" on the itinerary of
every tourist. Busloads of
visitors spill out onto a semi-
circular stone observation
platform in the middle of the
site. They sit on the wide ter-
races of this amphitheater
and listen to their guides re-
count the story of Jerusalem.
It is easier to understand the
growth of the original City of
David when you can see the
hills.
On a clear day, you can even
see the Hills of Moab in Jor-
dan to the east, as well as the
arid hills of the Judean
Desert leading down to the
Dead Sea. The southern wall
of the Temple Mount is clear-
ly visible, and the keen-
sighted visitor can just pick
out signs of the ar-
chaeological park below.
The area around and below
the stonework is being
planted with gardens, though
the planners point out that
they are trying to protect the
natural fauna of the area,
which is a transition zone bet-
ween the Mediterranean
region to the west and the Ju-
dean Desert to the east. The
breathtaking view will
improve.

Jewish Telegraphic Agency

'""'l NEWS

Romania Denies
Waldheim Invite

New York (JTA)—The
Romanian Ambassador to the
United States last week
denied that Austrian Presi-
dent has received an invita-
tion to visit Romania
Diplomatically isolated by
much of the international
community, Waldheim was
barred from entering the
United States last April
following a year-long Justice
Department investigation
which cited evidence that as
a German intelligence officer
during World War II "Kurt
Waldheim assisted or other-
wise participated in the
persecution of persons of race,
religion, national origin or
political opinion."

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