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October 09, 1987 - Image 30

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1987-10-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I CLOSE-UP I

DON MASSEY CADILLAC

Send it for less
at ...

WE APPRECIATE
YOUR BUSINESS

Wye

6453 Farmington Rd.

453-7500

40475 Ann Arbor Rd. at 1.275, Plymouth, MI

(at Maple Rd.)

855-5822

T I ME F O R
G O OD
BUYS.

AT GORMAN'S FURNITURE CLEARANCE CENTER.

We offer you 40% to 70% savings every day on clearance items from all four
Gorman's stores. Customer cancellations, slightly injured merchandise, one-of-a-
kinds, floor samples...and it's all Gorman's quality furniture. Plus, we're able to
bring you special merchandise we've acquired through one-time manufacturer deals.

Gorman's Furniture Clearance Center. Quality furniture at 40% to 70% savings.
No frills. No design staff. No special orders. No holds or layaways. No extra costs.
Just good buys, four days a week.

Sectionals • Sofas/Loveseats • Chairs • Occasional Tables • Leather • Bedding
• Dining Rooms/Dinettes • Sleep sofas • Bedrooms • Wall units

Nominal charge for delivery

Phone: 357-7774

©1987 GORMAN'S

30

FRIDAY, OCT. 9, 1987

C7 0 MKS
FURNITURE
CLEARANCE
CENTER

OPEN 4 DAYS
Thurs. & Fri. Noon-9 p.m.
Sat. & Sun. Noon-6 p.m.

Confronting

Continued from preceding page

ed men of their generations"
has not resolved the issue of
the Messiah, says Rabbi
Bergstein, then "the time has
come for peaceful co-
existence." No new light on
the matter is likely to be shed
by Hebrew Christian Mis-
sionaries, he says, most of
whom are 'totally unlettered,
with no knowledge of
Halachic law."
"I challenge Moishe Rosen,
who claims to be well-
educated in Jewish matters,
to say how many days he
spent in a higher institute of
Judaism. He has not one
day's experience. I challenge
him to show me where in the
Jewish Bible the name of the
Messiah is mentioned,"
Bergstein declares.
"For such people to present
themselves as scholars is
fraud. For them to do so in an
attempt to tear a child away
from its roots is vicious,
malicious parasitism at its
worst.
"We have to address these
problems, even if they affect
only a few people," he
reiterates. The key to doing so
is education.
"If the Jewish community
did a better job of educating
itself and its children this
wouldn't be such a problem,"
agrees Ronnie Schreiber.
"People wouldn't be such easy
foils for them if they knew
what it meant to be Jewish."
The Schreibers hope to en-
courage more parents to
enroll their children in
Jewish classes and to follow
through at home. They also
suggest that units on corn-
paritive religion and on deal-
ing with deceptive missionary
claims be added to existing
curricula and advocate
outreach programs tailored to
each segment of the
community.

Through leafleting and
counseling they are trying to
"retrieve" existing converts
and those hovering on the
brink. By writing to and
picketing those churches
which host Hebrew Christian
programs, they hope to
"undercut the support the
missionaries get from
evangelical Christians."
This spring, the group
"picketed" the local churches
hosting "Christ in the
Passover." "Many pastors,
says Schreiber, "were ge-
nuinely surprised at our op-
position." They have also
distributed pamphlets at both
local missions and tried to
"counterleaflet" wherever
and whenever the mis-
sionaries are most active.
Eventually, the Schreibers
hope to form an official
chapter of Jews for Judaism.
At the moment its organiza-

tion is informal and most of
the expenses are met by the
Schreibers.
A cardinal rule in their
work with Jewish converts is
honesty. "We use some of the
same methods as the mis-
sionaries. We `outnice' them.
We give out leaflets. But
when we approach people, or
invite them home, we tell
them straight out that we're
trying to change their
religion," Schreiber says.
There are legitimate ways
to fight fire with fire, they
believe. By making their
presence felt they can show
missionaires "that they're not
the only ones with First
Amendments rights." And by
matching the missionaires'
friendliness and warmth,
they can show the disaffected
that they do not have to leave
their faith or their communi-
ty to find concern and car-
ing.



Nuirr7JEWS Immwm"'

Extremists
Convicted

New York (JTA) — Five
members of a rightwing tax
protest group with links to a
violently anti-Semitic organi-
zation were convicted in Las
Vegas last week of threaten-
ing the lives of agents of the
Internal Revenue Service and
a Nevada state judge.
The five are members of
Thates, a group affiliated
with the Christian Identity
movement, which espouses
the belief that the Jews are
the children of Satan and
which calls the United States
government "ZOG" —
"Zionist-Occupied Govern-
ment." The Committee was
formed in 1984 in Mariposa,
California.
Those convicted face possi-
ble maximum sentences of 34
years' imprisonment and
fines of $250,000, according
to assistant U.S. prosecuting
attorney Richard Pocker.
The trial was monitored by
the Anti-Defamation League
of B'nai B'rith in Los
Angeles, which has furnished
information on the case to
law enforcement agencies
throughout the country.

Nab Terrorists

Jerusalem (JTA) — Securi-
ty forces captured three ter-
rorists who had escaped from
Napha prison, a maximum
security facility in the Negev.
Two were serving life terms
and the third a 47-year
sentence.
According
to
the
authorities, the three were
trying to cross the border in
Egypt concealed in a
truckload of hay.

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