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October 02, 1987 - Image 90

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1987-10-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Ben. r YOU DESERVE
yAaD A SLAB TODAY
BAR 13
$10.95
fo Rf R fis RIBS & CHICKEN
$6.95 Ex

PLACE

Open
7 Days
11 a.m.-12 Mid.

Plres

10-9-871

LUNCHEON SPECIAL–MON.-FRI. 11-4

HOMEMADE SOUP
AND SANDWICH $375

FARMINGTON HILLS — 851-1000
31006 ORCHARD LAKE RD. AT 14

COUPON ORDERS

DINE-IN OR
CARRY-OUT

LIVONIA — 427-6500
38043 PLYMOUTH RD.

Restaurant

AT APPLEGATE SQUARE
Southfield
Northwestern Hwy. at Inkster Rd.
Dining and Cocktails
For Dinner Reservations: 353-2757

EARLY DINNER SPECIALS

MONDAYS THRU SATURDAYS 4:30 p.m. to 6 p.m.

• Fresh White Fish
With Raspberry Buerre Blanc
• Chicken Primavera
With Fettucine Alfredo
•Petite Frog Legs, Roadhouse Style
With Homemade Tartar Sauce
• Grilled Provimi Calves Liver
With Sauteed Onions

95

Effective May 8, 1987

Dinners Include: Soup du jour, tossed salad,
potatoes, fresh vegetables and
French bread and butter.

■■

Oh,
",":•
-•
_„,„:".
61 .41•014

4

e a,
I

i a

ffa•ird-
de

N‘ •
Join Us For
A Pleasant Surprise and
N
Discover That THERE IS A DIFFERENCE!

ea,
IWO
410

6638 TELEGRAPH AND MAPLE
IN THE BLOOMFIELD PLAZA

851-0313

• Breakfast • Lunch • Dinner
In the Casual Elegant
Atmosphere You Want For
Gracious Enjoyable Dining

1 Days a Week

Enjoy Our Fine Dinner Specials .
Different Each Day

— Hours —

,

58

Monday Thru Saturday
7 a.m. to 9:30 p.m.
Sunday
8 a.m. thru 9 p.m.

FRIDAY, OCT. 2, 1987

as

Eddie and the Cruisers

(1983), An Officer and a

(Except Bar-B-Q Rib)

1

Movie Music Man

Continued from preceding page

Gentleman (1982) and Star-
man (1984). He did the music
editing for Under the Cherry
Moon (1986) and claims its
star, rock artist Prince, "is
one mean ping pong player."
Sobel is on the committee
that nominates selections for
the Academy Awards.
Although to date there's no
separate awards category for
music editing, he said that
the industry seems more
ready to initiate one and
believes it's just a matter of
time before that happens.
How he developed from a
reflective guitar-strumming
teen to a technician who's in-
ternationally regarded in the
movie editing business is a
spirited adventure which
shows Sobel's steadfast
realism surviving a star-
studded milieu.
It was a guitar Sobel receiv-
ed as a bar mitzvah present
that encouraged his initial
creativity.
"I didn't socialize much. I
would pretty much stay in my
room after school and try to
make music."
He also consistently chose
jobs in local hospitals like
Southfield's Providence
Hospital, or nursing homes,
because he enjoyed helping
the elderly and was preparing
for a medical future. But after
being in a pre-med program
in Ann Arbor for 3Y2 years,
his direction changed.
"One of my housemates was
a medical student who was
also very much into music. He
very emphatically told me
that it was impossible to give
his all to both, that he felt he
was really sacrificing the
musical part of him. I started
questioning if I would be able
to do that, and I knew I
couldn't!'
Striking an arrangement
with his science instructors to
grade him through midterms,
he took some electives in his
last semester. He then enroll-
ed in Boston's Berklee School
of Music's program in compos-
ing and arranging.
Two years of study accorded
him a diploma, and some very
critical experience.
"The film department
chairman, Don Wilkins,
perhaps sensed I was more
mature than the other
students because I was on
average, two years older. He
let me critique their work,
and I believe that really
sharpened my skills!"
His next step was New York
City, where, after three visits,
he was minutes from placing
a deposit on a Bleeker Street
apartment in the village.
"As much as I loved the ci-
ty, something told me not to

Sobel examines the film frame by frame in order to make his editing
decision.

do it. I guess I knew that if I
was to make it in the music
business, I would have to
head out west?'
In the fall of 1978, he load-
ed his Ford Torino, and em-
barked on a solo, four-day,
three-night journey across the
United States. Once in
California, "I lived for two
weeks out of my car, sleeping
on the sofa of a friend I'd
known from a summer land-
scaping job."
He didn't act impetuously.
He chose an avenue he knew
to earn money — working in
the intensive care depart-
ment of a Culver City
hospital.
"I decided that when I was
comfortable with the
geographics I'd look for a job
in the music field."
Six months later, he follow-
ed the gut feeling that told
him the time was now A
chance meeting at the Todd A-
0 Dubbing Studio with the
son of the owner of an in-
dependent music editing
studio proved auspicious.
"When Dan Carlin, Sr.
hired me, it must have been
that old adage working: 'the
right place at the right time.'
I also think he figured my
prior experience made me a
good risk."
In their three-year associa-
tion, Carlin taught Sobel all
the technical knowledge he is
putting to use in his career.
Asked about his future, Sobel
admits to a fondness for com-
posing and believes he will
one day focus on his original
ambition.
For now, the fascinating
variety of a work style which
can take him from the pure
Americana central to The
Flamingo Kid (1984), to the
fantasy, imagery and
superstition of a picture like
Young Sherlock Holmes
(1985), is a very satisfying
way to make a living.
"I enjoy what I do because
it doesn't get old. I'm on a

film perhaps three months,
and get to move on to new
people, a new environment, a
fresh story and radically dif-
ferent music. Plus, except for
those rare, pressure-cooker
crises, I'm on the job
weekdays from 9 to 5!"
In town recently to visit his
parents, Gloria and Milford
Sobel, brother, sister and
their families, Sobel said
moviegoers will get more op-
portunities to listen to some
of his recently finished work.
Releases scheduled for late

A chance meeting
with the son of the
owner of an
independent music
editing studio
proved auspicious.
"When Dan Carlin,
Sr. hired me, it
must have been
'the right place
at the right time. "

fall include Bright Lights, Big
City, directed by James
Bridges; Cross My Heart, a
Larry Kazdan production
starring Annette O'Toole; and
Hail, Hail Rock and Roll, a
retrospective with music by
Chuck Berry and directed by
Sobel's favorite director,
Hackford.
When he's not working,
Sobel, his wife Connie and
their 2%-year-old son, Tommy,
do the same things other
Californians living on a
beachfront do: enjoy the views
from their Pacific Palisades
home, and play the games
toddlers love best. And they
listen to music. Sobel's
favorites? The Beatles, '60s
music, and motion picture
music.
"I've probably got close to
1,000 sound tracks in my per-
sonal collection!'



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