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October 02, 1987 - Image 26

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1987-10-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

FOCUS

I

Woolf Roofing & Maintenance Inc.

A Third Generation Roofing Family in Detroit

Commercial & Industrial Flat Roofs
Single-Ply and Built-up Systems

Survivors Face Delayed
Reaction to Suffering

Fully insured

Call Scott or Roy Woolf
for free inspections

18161 W. 13 Mile Rd.
in Southfield

646-2452

,

,

STACY CUSTOM DRAPERIES

ONE OF MICHIGAN'S OLDEST DRAPERY COMPANIES

FREE DESIGN

SHOP AT HOME

.

OVER 10,000 SAMPLES TO CHOOSE FROM

IRV KORENS
INVENTOR: CHROME/GOLD
VERTICAL BLINDS

STACY

18444 W. 10 MILE RD.
SOUTHFIELD, MI

SWAGS — BALLOONS — CORNICE BOARDS
MEMBER BETTER BUSINESS BUREAU

SPECIAL SALE $14 00 Yo. FABRIC NOW $869

NG
N—
E SSEEN
RVSITLEE PRICES"
"IMAGINATIONH IONUSRTYPLHIO

557-8740

SLEEK AND SENSUOUS, IT MOVES
WITH A SILENT RUSH OF V-12 POWER.
THIS IS THE STUFF OF LEGENDS.

THE 1988 JAGUAR XJ-S

:

A true thoroughbred, the XJ-S is powered by
Jaguar's overhead cam, fuel-injected V-12, an
engine proven in international endurance racing
and millions of highway miles.
The XJ-S is also a truly elegant Grand Touring
car, built to Jaguar's highest standards of hand-
crafted luxury. Its interior is graced by seats covered

643-6900

1815 MAPLEL AWN. TROY

26

FRIDAY, OCT. 2, 1987

FREE
ESTIMATES

with supple top grain leather, rich polished burl
walnut in the dashboard, console and door panels
and a wealth of thoughtful amenities.
The 1988 V-12, Jaguar XJ-S is truly the stuff of
legends. It is covered by an extensive three year/
36,000 mile warranty and Jaguar's new Service-
On-Sitesm Roadside Assistance Plan. For details on
this uniquely comprehensive plan and Jaguar's
limited warranty, applicable in the USA and
Canada, see your Jaguar dealer.

ENJOY TOMORROW. BUCKLE UP TODAY.

JAGUAR XJ-S

BETWEEN CROOKS AND COOLIDGE
OPEN MONDAY AND
THURSDAY UNTIL 9 P.M.

HUGH ORGEL

T

he delayed reactions
by many Holocaust
survivors to the
trauma of four decades past is
increasingly a problem for
them, and the focus of resear-
chers here.
A recent seminar on "Ef-
fects of the Holocaust on the
Aging Population," organized,
for professionals working
with the elderly by
Jerusalem's Shaarei Zedek
Hospital Geriatric Institute
and Emunah College,
surveyed the latest effects of
imprisOnment in the camps.
It also examined "survivors
syndrome," whereby the
delayed effects of Holocaust
trauma surface only decades
later.
Speakers noted that
memories became more vivid
later in life, and some elder-
ly Holocaust survivors begin
to relive their war horrors,
bringing back long-repressed
memories. They often suffer
physical and mental
breakdowns, self-imposed
social isolation or even
suicidal tendencies.
They become people
without loyalties, feeling
stateless and cultureless.
They lack a sense of personal
identity. Most of unable to
share their experiences with
their spouses and children,
and are afraid to love.
Dr. Henry Shor, a senior
psychiatrist at Shalvata
Hospital, explained that some
patients he had treated for
severe depression, apathy or
psychoses actually were reac-
ting to World War II ex-
periences they had managed
to repress.
He said that during the war
these people had used all
their physical and emotional
strength to deal with
emergencies at hand. "Even
mourning was a luxury that
no one could afford at the
time if he wanted to survive,"
Shor explained.
After the war, he said, while
trying to rebuild their broken
lives many became
"workaholics," escaping into
their jobs to flee from the
past. They married or remar-
ried, raised children — and
tried to forget.
Thus, retirement can be
especially traumatic for the
survivor. The halt of regular
work often leads to total men-
tal or physical breakdown,
the researchers said.
Dr. Tikva Natan of Haifa
University noted that the
price of such repression was

high, with survivors tending
to "deaden" their feelings and
thus being unable to sustain
a normal parent-child
relationship.
The survivors, she said,
were either protective, fear-
ful, smothering parents with
unusually high expectations
or, on the other hand,
withdrawn, unresponsive and
overly harsh.
Dr. Julius Elraz, himself a
former camp inmate, spoke
about the guilt harbored by
Holocaust victims often for
decades. "They try to push
- away the thought:Why did I
remain alive while so many
better than I died?' " he said.
"They inevitably feel they

They become
people without
loyalties, feeling
stateless and
cultureless.

saved themselves by the
death of others — and there
are cases where this is indeed
true."
Dr. Betty Brodsky of the
Feuerstein Institute remark-
ed that such people "have a
need to punish themselves"
and cannot to this day allow
themselves to enjoy life or
take part in happy events.
Holocaust survivors
undergo another traumatic
experience when they need
hospitalization or nursing
care. They then feel a loss of
control over their own
destinies by submitting to
authority as they did 45 years
ago. But they also recall the
sadistic experiments they and
their children were forced to
undergo in the camps. They
panic at the recollection that
it was the sick and infirm
who were murdered first.
According to the experts,
aging concentration camp
survivors suffer from insom-
nia, nightmare, predisposi-
tion to illness and hypochon-
dria, chronic fatigue, impa-
tience and agressive behavior
toward others.
But on the positive side, the
camp survivors are by and
large a tight brotherhood who
maintain contact.
Some survivors feel they re-
mained alive to - "bear
witness" and hence, after
retirement, when they final-
ly come to terms with their
memories and their present
situation in life, many "open
up" for the first time in 40
years, the seminar par-
ticipants were told.

Copyright 1987, JTA,

inc.

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