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September 25, 1987 - Image 44

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1987-09-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

YOUTH

The ownership
and management of
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would like to extend Holiday
greetings to all our friends
and customers. L'shana tova.

NFTY Trip

Continued from preceding page

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44

FRIDAY, SEPT. 25, 1987

with the older sister. On
Saturday night,. they invited
us out with them and their
friends. We went to the Ben
Yehuda mall downtown.
Believe me, Israeli kids real-
ly do it up."
As time passed, most pe-
ple got used to Israeli food.
While 17-year-old Seth
Golden claimed to be surviv-
ing on chocolate bars during
the 'first week, by the middle
of the trip, he and his friends
were learning to cope with
falafel,. Israeli salads,
schnitzel and other local
specialties. Some participants
did more than cope; they rav-
ed about hummous, Israeli
pizza and the fresh fruits and
vegetables.
"I think a lot of us forget
where we are sometimes:'
said 16-year Old A.J. G-oldman
while relaxing on the lawn
outside of the Diaspora
Museum in Tel Aviv. "Except
foi- Jerusalem, Israeli cities
are a lot like America."
Still, A.J. had a little trou-
ble focusing on-the aspects of
Israel that set it apart.
"Every year, Jews say
`Next year in Jerusalem; "
A.J. noted, "and we've been
there!"
On the night before their
return flight, the group en-
joyed a festive farewell ban-
quet at a restaurant just out-
side of Jerusalem. High atop
a hill, they enjoyed a view of
the Judean hills that would
make anybody dream of
returning to Israel.
At the Wall, the Detroit

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youths lost themselves in
quiet meditation. Some hugg-
ed the stones passionately,
while others stared in awe,
thinking about the thousands
of years of Jewish history
which they had absorbed in
five weeks.
Fifteen-year-old Marty
Haenick sat in a chair near
the ancient stones and stared
for a long, long time. When he

"I don't
understand
something," a
kibbutznik was
asked. "What's
your overall goal?
To make money, or
just be happy?"

finally stood, he said, "I was
thinking about the first time
I came to the Western Wall,
and about all that this place
means to us. Before I came to
Israel, I didn't believe in all of
the stories of the Bible, but all
that has changed now
"All of the stories revolve
around Jeruslaem. Seeing the
sights makes the stories very
real 'for me. Coming to Israel
made me believe. Now I feel
that a part of me, and a part
of every Jew, is here in
Israel.



MIDEAST I

Assad-Hussein Meeting
Confounds U.S. Agents

WOLF BLITZER

W

ashington. — Syrian
President Hafez As-
sad's public confir-
.
mation that he did indeed
meet secretly. last April with
Iraqi President Saddam Hus-
sein has boosted the reputa-
tion of Israel's intelligence
services among American
specialists both in and out of
the U.S. government.
Shortly after the secret
meeting, U.S. sources said,
the Israeli intelligence com-
munity had quickly managed
to confirm that it did -occur.
Israeli sources then publicly
reported the bare facts of the
meeting to Israeli and foreign
reporters in Jerusalem. The
Washington Post, for example,
published a story about the
meeting written by its
Jerusalem-based
correspondent.

But the U.S. intelligence
community, on the -other
hand, was initially skeptical
of Israel's confirmation. For a
few weeks, U.S. officials were
unable to confirm it. Several
of them in fact openly dis-
counted the Israeli assess-
ment in conversations with
reporters.
These officials suggested
that lower-ranking Iraqi and
Syrian representatives may
have met — but.certainly not
Assad and Hussein.
Eventually, however, the
U.S. intelligence community -
confirmed that the Syrian
and Iraqi leaders — bitter and
long-time rivals — had indeed
met secretly in Jordan. The
Israeli account, after all, had
been accurate.
King Hussein had played
the key role in organizing the -
secret session, according to
U.S. officials. But the king,
despite his close relationship

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