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September 18, 1987 - Image 46

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1987-09-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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Bais Chabad Welcomes you to Celebrate

ROS11
HASIIONA
YOM KIPPUR

5748-1987

Rosh Hoshona

Yom Kippur

Wednesday, September 23
Mincha - 7:20 p.m.

Friday, October 2
Mincha - 3:30 p.m.
Kol Nidre - 7:05 p.m.

Thursday, September 24
Intro to prayers - 9:00 a.m.
Shacharis - 9:30 a.m.
Shofar - 11:45 a.m.
Mincha - 6:50 p.m.
Tashlich - 7:15 p.m.

Shabbos morning, October 3
Intro to prayers - 9:00 a.m.
Shacharis - 9:30 a.m.
Yizkor - 12:00 p.m.
Mincha - 6:00 p.m.
Neilah - 7:00 p.m.

Friday, September 25
Intro to prayers - 9:00 a.m.
Shacharis - 9:30 a.m.
Shofar - 1:45 a.m.
Mincha - 7:20 p.m.

Tickets $50 Individual

44

FRIDAY, SEPT. 18, 1987

Holiday Dilemma

Continued from preceding page

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he has received a
few complaints from students
about the starting date at
MSU. "Dick Lobenthal, direc-
tor of the Michigan Region of
the Anti-Defamation League,
and I are going to address the
MSU President's Council in
the near future to try to
resolve the issue of school
starting on the religious
holidays.
"There is a psychological
burden that falls on students
when they miss the first few
days of school, especially
freshmen. Does any school
start on Christmas?"
According to Joseph Owsley,
director of News and Informa-
tion Services at the Universi-
ty of Michigan, their policy is
similar to that of MSU.
"Customarily, we try to work
around the Jewish holidays.
The university calendar has
all the holidays and the pro-
fessors are asked to schedule
around the major ones.
"If a test or lecture falls on
a holiday the student can ap-
proach the professor and try
to make other arrangements.
But it is ultimately up to the
professor to do what they
want. A student can always
appeal to the dean, and we
have not had any serious
problems.
"A significant number of
our faculty are Jewish. There
is a sensitivity on this cam-
pus to the needs of people
following Judaism."
While many students ex-
press concern about missing
schoolwork on the holidays,
most said they did not ex-
perience difficulty getting ex-
cused from class if they chose
not to attend. All said they
were responsible for making
up assignments, and re-
scheduling lectures and
exams.
Judy Michaels, mother of
three college students and a
student herself at Eastern
Michigan University, recalls
an unpleasant experience.
"I had one teacher at
Eastern who said attendance
was mandatory," Michaels
said. "Every time you missed
class she deducted points
from your grade. I explained
that Yom Kippur was our
most sacred holiday and I was
going to miss class, but she
said the only excuse for
absence was a doctor's note.
She allowed no other
exceptions.
"I went to the department
head and he said he would
talk to her. "This was in the
school of social work, and I
was very disappointed in the
teacher's reaction."
Lorrie Applebaum, a stu-
dent at Oakland Community
College and mother of college
students, said she has never

had difficulty with her
schedule at the holidays.
"Some of my teachers have
been Jewish, and others
reschedule assignments and
let you make up the work.

"The school is small enough
that you don't lose the per-
sonal touch with the teachers.
I don't think there has ever
been a problem with being ex-
cused."
While students sometimes
go home for the holidays to
please their parents, the
situation can also work in
reverse. "My parents are not
observant," said Kim
Rosenfeld, a senior at
Eastern. "But I drive home to
West Bloomfield and go to
evening services at temple
with a friend and her family
because I feel it is something
I should do.
"But my school work comes
first and I do not miss classes

"There is a
psychological
burden that falls
on students when
they miss the first
few days of
school." — State
Rep. David
Honigman

during the day. I usually feel
that I have to attend my
classes so I don't fall behind.
I try to celebrate the holiday
and still go to class."
What do most college
students do on the Jewish
holidays? The answers are as
varied as the students
themselves.
James Aronovitz, a
graduate of the University of
Michigan, 33,000 students,
6,000 Jewish students:
"The first year at Michigan
I stayed at school for the
holidays because I was too
nervous to miss, but after
that I came home to be with
my family. I'm always uptight
that I'll miss something
important.
"Classes are held as usual_
but I think they can be
rescheduled. Next week I'm
starting medical school at
Michigan State School of
Osteopathy. School starts the
second day of the holiday and
I intend to go to class."
Julie Weingarden, Univer-
sity of Wisconsin, 42,000
students, 3,600 Jewish:
"I came home on Rosh
Hashanah because my
parents wanted me to, and
because on the Jewish holi-
day you have to be with your
family and go to shul. But it
was close to six-week exams
and the second day of the holi-

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