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September 18, 1987 - Image 151

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1987-09-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Season Calls for Slicha-Gram

During this holiday season, we try to resolve problems between
man and man. The Slicha-Gram is a non-threatening, tactful way of
letting a friend or relative know that you really are sorry. Whether the
Slicha-Gram is used literally or just as a basis for a family discussion,
it should be a good way to begin a dialogue about one of the major
themes of the High Holiday season: forgiveness.

sump-GRAM








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TO:

FROM

Make Your Own
Holiday Greeting Card

MATERIALS YOU WILL NEED:

Construction Paper
Scissors
Crayons
Paste

TO START

1. FOLD PAPER IN HALF

—FOLD

PaW Need A Pen Pal? Write

To A Soviet Jewish Family

One way to learn about
Jewish life around the world is
to write to a Jewish family in
another country. What is daily
life like in the pen pal's
country? What is Jewish life
like? How are the holidays
celebrated? To help our
readers learn about Jews
around the world, L'Chayim is
making available addresses of
Jewish families in communities
abroad. This month, addresses
of Russian Jewish refuseniks
were made available by the
Detroit Soviet Jewry Committee
of the Jewish Community
Council.
Before writing, please read
these special rules for
corresponding with Russian
Jews:
Letters should be
personal, warm, sympathetic,
and should ask about
birthdays, anniversaries and
family events. Cards should be
exchanged on these occasions
and on the Jewish holidays as
well. Avoid any anti-Soviet
material and refrain from
mentioning names of Soviet
Jewry rescue organizations.
Russian, Yiddish, Hebrew or
English may be used. The
standard way to address a
letter to the Soviet Union is the
reverse of the American way:
USSR, Name of Republic,

Name of City, Address,

Addressee (last name first).
The fee is 44 cents per 1/2
ounce, up to two ounces.
This month's pen pal is
Leonid Volvovsky, a Russian
Jewish refusenik who has
been denied permission to
emigrate from the Soviet Union
since 1974. Prior to filing for an
exit visa, Volvovsky was
employed at the Moscow
Research Institute of Complex
Mechanization and
Automization in Oil and Gas.
He was dismissed from his
position and forced to work at
odd jobs after applying to
emigrate.
Volvovsky, his wife,
Ludmilla, and daughter Kira
(age 18) have been continually
harassed. A Talmudic scholar,
Volvovsky has been actively
promoting Jewish culture and
the study of Hebrew. Their
personal belongings have been
confiscated and their home
daubed with anti-Semitic
slogans. In October 1985,
Volvovsky was sentenced to
three years imprisonment for
"defaming the Soviet state."
He was released from labor
camp last March.
Letters may be sent to the
family at the following address:
USSR, RSFSR, Gorky 603081,
Krilova 14A-115, Volvovsky,
Leonid.

2. CUT OUT ROSH HASHANAH SYMBOLS,

PASTE PICTURES ON FRONT OF CARD

L) shanah Tovah



rue?

4-- FOLD

3. WRITE YOUR OWN

GREETING HERE

4. MAIL TO A FRIEND OR
RELATIVE. WE
ENCOURAGE YOU TO
SEND IT TO THE
VO LVOVS KY FAMILY IN
THE USSR.

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

L-3

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