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September 11, 1987 - Image 63

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1987-09-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

ENTERTAINMENT

of Design in New York, "an endowed
school, because we didn't have too
much money." After several terms of
drawing and painting classes, Gothelf
was able to support himself as a com-
mercial artist.
"I hated the commercial work, but
I had to eat;' he recalls. Joining his
family, who had moved to Toledo, the
young fellow was hired as a scenic ar-
tist's assistant at a nearly theater.
After a year, Gothelf remembers, his
boss was suddenly fired one night in
the midst of preparations for a major
production. The job of completing four
sets and two drops fell to the fledgl-
ing artist, who was not yet 20. More
than 60 years later he can still hear
the audience applause at the close of
opening night for his first set designs.
After assignments with dramatic
stock companies from Milwaukee to
The Gothelfs will open an exhibit of their work at the Rubiner Gallery Sept. 18.
Cleveland to New York, Gothelf took
up residence in Chicago as a scenic
designer for the Chicago Civic Opera
Co. He worked as a set designer in
Chicago from 1925 to 1939, but "I
always preferred getting up there
with a paint brush." Of his WPA
assignments during the war years,
Gothelf recalls: "That's when the
leading lady and the stage hands got
the same salary."
Gothelf remembers selling his
first painting for $25 in 1917, a por-
trait of Sholom Aleichem. He con-
tinued to paint, but with a wife and
two young daughters, the couple
JUDY MARX
sought additional income. Things
Special to The Jewish News
were "still lean" when they decided
to purchase a hotel in East Chicago,
coming exhibit as "a tribute to painting, Gothelf says.
Actually 13-year-old Gothelf had Ind., a very successful enterprise for
Shwayder and Gothelfs long commit-
ment to art and to the personal vision not thought much about art until he more than a decade.
Throughout this period Gothelf
that has shaped their individual immigrated to Brooklyn with his
mother and sisters, and one day hap- exhibited many of his works, receiv-
thinking and perception."
In the early 1900's Gothelf was a pened to notice an artist painting in ed numerous awards for his portraits
youngster in Vitebsk, Russia, who en- a window. "Now I said to myself, 'This and landscapes and accepted many
important commissions. A GOthelf
joyed the company of a pal who later is very interesting.' "
Following high school, the youth, portrait of former President Jimmy
signed his paintings with the name
Marc Chagall. At that time they were' who had now begun to draw as a hob- Carter is now in the archives of the
more interested in swimming than by, enrolled in the National Academy Carter Library. His paintings have

Bob McKeown

W

hen Reva Shwayder and
Louis Gothelf decided for-
mally to join their lives a
year ago, they created a
very special union. Despite
the fact that the pair of octogenarians
will tease each other in friendly
banter over subjects ranging from art
to religion, theirs is a bond which is
sealed by a characteristic calm that
has emerged from more than 170
, years of combined experience. Their
unique relationship is as apparent to
those who know Shwayder and
Gothelf as serious artists, as it is to
friends and family whose lives have
been brushed by Reva and Lou.
So special did Lou's daughter, film
maker Sue Marx, view the pairing
that she decided to document their
courtship, wedding and personal
glimpses into their lives in Young At
Heart. The film is one of four
documentaries to be shown at the
prestigious New York Film Festival
next month.
"Of course, we're going to be
there," says Gothelf, bursting with
fatherly pride. Packing up and taking
off are as much a part of the couple's
routine as are the hours they spend
daily in their art studio.
Approximately 40 paintings,
which have emerged from that
workshop since the couple met three
years ago, will be on display beginn-
ing Sept. 18 at the Rubiner Gallery
in West Bloomfield.
Gothelfs watercolor landscapes
and portraits are easily
distinguishable from Mrs. Gothelfs
acrylic abstracts and still lifes.
"But we do not plan to separate
them in the exhibit;' says Gallery
Manager David Roberts. "Although
we have exhibited the works of other
husbands and wives before, it is rare
to find an artist couple who are both
so productive in their mid-80s."
Carole Rubiner, who together
with husband Allen own and direct
the Rubiner Gallery, sees the forth-

Young At Heart

Reva Shwayder Gothelf and
Louis Gothelf stay youthful by
pursuing their artistic interests

GOING PLACES

WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 11 - 17

MUSIC

Maple-Drake Branch, Louis
Nagel, 3:30 p.m. Sunday.

SPECIAL EVENTS

PINE KNOB MUSIC
THEATRE
George Benson, 8 p.m.
Saturday, admission.

CHAMBER MUSIC
SOCIETY OF DETROIT
Orchestra Hall, Detroit,
Guarneri String Quartet
and The Beaux Arts Trio, 8
p.m. today and Saturday,
admission, 833-3700.
JEWISH COMMUNITY
CENTER
Jimmy Prentis Morris
Branch, 15110 W. 10 Mile
Rd., Oak Park, Michigan
Light Opera Company, 2
p.m. Sunday, admission,
967-4030.

MICHIGAN
RENAISSANCE
FESTIVAL
Dixie Highway between
Pontiac and Flint, one mile
north of Mt. Holly, Inc.,
Holly, drama, mimes,
magicians, crafts, games,
food, Saturdays and
Sundays through Sept. 27,
admission, 645-9640.

DETROIT INSTITUTE
OF ARTS
5200 Woodward Ave.,
Detroit, Brunch With Bach,
10 and 11:30 a.m. Sunday,
admission, 832-2730.

JULIUS CHAJES MUSIC
FUND CONCERT
SERIES
Jewish Community Center,

THEATER

SHAW FESTIVAL

Niagara-On-The-Lake, _
Ontario, Peter Pan, now
until Oct. 11, Fanny's First
Play, now until Sept. 27,
and Night Of Jan. 16th,
now until Sept. 27,
(416)468-2172.

DOWNTOWN DINNER
THEATER
Veterans Memorial
Building banquet hall,
They're Playing Our. Song,
presented by Jimmy Launce
Productions, cocktails 6:30
p.m., dinner at 7 p.m.,
curtain at 8:45 p.m. every
Friday and Saturday,

admission, reservations,
224-6000.
HENRY FORD MUSEUM
Greenfield Village,
Dearborn, My Sister Eileen,
8:30 p.m. today and
Saturday, admission,
271-1620.
FISHER THEATRE
Fisher Building, Detroit,
Arsenic and Old Lace, 8
p.m. now through Sept. 27,
admission, 872-1000.
GREAT LAKES DINNER
PLAYHOUSE

Continued on Page 65

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

63

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