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September 04, 1987 - Image 46

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1987-09-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

INSIGHT

ATTENTION:
CAR BUYERS

Build a better life

Ex-Hostage Glass
Favored Arab Cause

BEFORE YOU BUY

.

SAVE BIG $

Tony is.
As one of the more than 6 million Americans with mental
retardation, he wants the same things you do . . . a happy,
productive life . . . to make friends . . . to prove himself.
Every day, people like Tony take part in programs of
education and job training, neighborhood living and
self-development, proving that persons with mental
retardation can contribute to our communities.
That's why the Association for Retarded Citizens asks for
your support. Help build better lives.

PROFESSIONAL AUTO
BUYING SERVICE WILL SPT.I,
YOU A BRAND NEW
DOMESTIC CAR FOR AS
LITTLE AS $100 OVER. SAVE
$$THOUSANDS$$. USE OUR
IMPORT CONNECTIONS.
FOR THE GUARANTEED
LOWEST PRICE,
COMPETTTIVE LEASE RATES

Jewish Association for Retarded Citizens
17288 W. 12 Mile Rd., Southfield, MI 48076
(313) 557-7650

CHESLIN AUTO

sales & leasing

Help build thearc

BERKLEY

Association for Retarded Citizens

545-5500

L.
N FRANKE
HERMA
s unfortu-
Approximately ten years ago, it wa facility for

natel-y necessary w find a nursing

DEPOSSING 'EVVAUENCE,.

iffy IflOthet.

IT WAS A VERN
When I had the opportunity to associate with
e% vie to develop and build 'a community
for the elderly that provided their needed
vices while prese rving th e environment
that
our residential
es alwayurrounded
. servic has
s s

d evelop

ments.

both functionally

"We're
,proud that Winders
and aesthetically
is truly special because it even
provides a residential en-viroarnent that pre-
require
serves dignity, beauty and residents
in

at a time in. life when its l support
some medical and socia.
Please come and visit Windernere. It is a very

ON

special place.
WINDEME-RE IS LOCATED
TARNIINGTON ROAD
MAPLE AND 14 MILE ROAD
ointm ent.
BETWEEN
all 661-1100 for an app
Drop in or c

46

FRIDAY, SEPT. 4, 1987

(Editor's note: Veteran Jour-
nalist Victor Bienstock died
suddenly on August 29. This
column was written three days
earlier.

VICTOR M. BIENSTOCK

A

merican Jews should
display more than
passing interest in
the case of Charles Glass, the
American journalist who was
reported kidnapped in Beirut
last May and turned up in Ju-
ly in Damascus to describe
how he had escaped from his
Shiite captors. Glass, a former
correspondent in Lebanon for
the ABC network, had, accor-
ding to his story, returned to
Beirut to gather material for
a book and was taken
prisoner when he crossed the
Green Line into Moslem-held
Beirut with the son of the
Lebanese Minister of Defense
and the latter's driver.
Glass has been described as
a "passionate partisan" of the
Arab cause. Some of his pro-
fessional colleagues have ex-
pressed doubts about aspects
of his description of his cap-
ture, two months of incarcera-
tion and escape. They have
openly suggested that his
jailers had deliberately per-
mitted him to slip past them.
, His friends have replied with
strong denounciations of Dan
Rather, the CBS anchorman,
and others who have openly
stated their belief that the
Glass caper was not exactly
as the newsman had describ-
ed it in numerous TV and
press interviews.
The Syrian authorities
claim that it was their in-
tervention that resulted in in-
structions to Glass's jailers
from high Iranian sources to
permit his "escape." Official
Washington tends to believe
that the Syrians might have
stage-managed the
newsman's liberation as they
may have done last year in
the case of Jeremy Levin, the
Cable News Network cor-
respondent. Levin either
eluded his jailers after a year
in captivity or was deliberate-
ly permitted by them to break
out of his prison.
The London daily, Indepen-
dent, argued that "the in-
creasing weight of evidence
that his (Glass's) dramatic
escape was actually a careful-
ly contrived way of allowing
him to go, without his kidnap-
pers appearing to give in to
pressure is a demonstration
that quiet diplomacy works."
It said "the Syrians astutely
used the seizure of Mr. Glass

to pursue their two political
aims: to avoid confrontation
with Iran in Lebanon and to
get back on reasonable terms
with the West."
Other press reports quoted
Washington sources for the
information that Syria had
been negotiating with
Teheran to secure Glass's
release. Regardless of how
Glass recovered his liberty,
Washington has been quick to
express its gratitude for
Syria's efforts in the case.
William M. Eagleton Jr., the
American ambassador who
was withdrawn from Damas-
cus last year after the Syrian
Government was shown to be
directly involved in the at-
tempt to destroy an El Al,

Some of Glass'
colleagues
doubted his story
about his capture.

airliner
at
London's
Heathrow Airport, is being
returned to his post —
another step, according to
The London Times, towards
Syria's rehabilitation in the
West.
The Glass affair has provid-
ed another chance to show
President Hafez al-Assad that
the Reagan Administration is
almost desperately eager to
establish close ties with his
regime. Ambassador Vernon
Walters, the chief U.S.
representative at the United
Nations, who visited Assad
recently in a move to better
relations, telephoned his
thanks to the Syrian dictator
for his assistance in securing
the release of the correspon-
dent. Secretary of State
George Shultz has written to
Assad along similar lines.
What makes the Glass af-
fair of special concern to
American Jews is that Glass,
according to The New
Republic, "was not an unbias-
ed or objective reporter. Glass
was a passionate partisan of
what he thought to be the
Arab cause, allocating his ar-
dors among warring factions
he wished were one. There
were not only the dexterous-
ly skewed dispatches on
television," the journal
reported, "but also somewhat
out of American view, more
obviously anti-Jewish screeds
in the Spectator of London.
"In ABC anchorman Peter
Jennings's report the night of
the kidnapping, he noted
Glass's concern for what he
euphemistically called the

.

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