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September 04, 1987 - Image 18

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1987-09-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I NEWS 1

grii,

DANCEMIL i

N

DANCE SHOES & DANCE WEAR

• LEOTARDS
• TIGHTS
• FASHION BODYWEAR

• BALLET SLIPPERS
• TAP SHOES
• JAZZ SHOES

Orchard Mall

Greg

Evergreen Plaza

Orchard Lake Rd., N. of Maple

12 Mile and Evergreen

West Bloomfield

Southfield

851-5566

0

559-3580

SHOES

American Red Magen David For Israel

/9

M CHIGAN

1

oNGE,404,,,
' D S

REGION

I

a r—/- 1
%.„ V /

1

SUPPORTING ISRAEL'S NATIONAL EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICE

TESTIMONIAL DINNER DANCE

honoring

MAX

and

RUTH SOSIN

Recipients of the Distinguished
Humanitarian Service Award

Sunday Evening
September 13, 1987
Congregation Adat Shalom

DR.

STEWART EPSTEIN

Dinner Chairman

DAVID B. HERMELIN

IRVING NUSBAUM

Associate Chairmen

PAUL BORMAN
WILLIAM M. DAVIDSON
IRWIN GREEN

DAVID MONDRY
MIKE MUST
JACK A. ROBINSON
MRS. MORRIS L. SCHAVER

CARMI M. SLOMOVITZ
PHILIP SLOMOVITZ
MYRON S. STEINBERG

Honorary Chairmen

DR. AND MRS. MORRIS STARKMAN

Advanced Gifts and Leadership Reception Chairmen

MR.
MR.
MR.
MR.
MR.
MR.
MR.

AND MRS.
AND MRS.
BERNARD
AND MRS.
AND MRS.
AND MRS.
AND MRS.

ALLEN CHARLUPSKI
MR. AND MRS. JOHN POLLAK
HENRY S. DORFMAN MR. AND MRS. JULIUS SCHAUMBERG
EDELMAN
MR. AND MRS. DONALD SHARFMAN
FRED FERBER
DR. AND MRS. LEO SHIPKO
DONALD FOX
MR. AND MRS. GRANT SILVERFARB
JOSEPH GYONGYOSI
MR. AND MRS. LOUIS SILVERFARB
ALEXANDER KARP
MR. AND MRS. HARRY YOUNG
DR. AND MRS. HAROLD A. MAXMEN

Advanced Gifts Associate Chairmen

DR. JOHN 1. MAMES

DR. MORRIS STARKMAN

Chairman, Michigan Region

Chairman, Medical-Dental Council

JOSEPH HANDLEMAN

BENJAMIN SAXE

National Chairman

National Executive Vice-President

- Other participants:

CANTOR HYMAN J. ADLER
CANTOR LOUIS KLEIN

RABBI EFRY G. SPECTRE
RABBI MORTON F. YOLKUT

Music by Eric Rosenow and His Continentals

Black Tie Optional

Cocktails 6:00
Couvert $40 per person
For reservation call American Red Magen David for Israel 353-0434

18

FRIDAY, SEPT. 4, 1987

Israel Downs Lavi

Continued from Page 1

put off several times because
of a cabinet deadlock on the
issue, but the abstention by
one cabinet minister on Sun-
day tilted the balance in favor
of a position recently adopted
by Foreign Minister Shimon
Peres.
Late last week, Peres was
persuaded that Israel could
not afford such an ambitious
project — Israel's largest ever
industrial undertaking.
It was also believed that he
was motivated by concern
that a decision in outright de-
fiance of the United States
might cause a serious rift in
relations between Washing-
ton and Jerusalem.
In exchange for canceling
the project, the United States
will allow Israel to spend
some $400 million a year of
its annual $1.8 billion
military aid allocation in
locally developed weapons
systems for the army and
navy. This will mean that
Israel will be able to continue
to employ many of its highly
skilled scientists and
engineers in other fields, such
as the development of pre-
cision-guided missiles.
Moshe Keret, managing
director of Israel Aircraft In-
dustries, Israel's largest
enterprise which was develop-
ing the plane, described the
cabinet vote as "a critical
decision" for his organization.
"It was not just the produc-
tion of the Lavi that was at
stake," he said. "It was the
production of military aircraft
in Israel.
"In my opinion, the decision
has terminated that possibili-
ty for the forseeable future."
Although there was strong
public support for the con-
tinuation of the Lavi project
— some opinion polls showed
as many as 80 percent of the
public in favor of the Lavi —
there was little evidence of
popular discontent when the
decision was made to scrap
the project.
There was, however, a
strong reaction from the
20,000-strong workforce of
Israel Aircraft Industries, and
many of the workers
demonstrated outside the
Knesset (parliament) while
the debate was in progress.
The following day, they took
their protests onto the streets,
blocking traffic along major
arteries throughout the coun-
try, including the Tel Aviv-
Jerusalem highway, and
abusing Histadrut labor
federation head Yisrael
Kessar when he arrived at
the plant's headquarters to
discuss the threatened mass
layoffs.
A spokesman for the work-
ers claimed that at least
6,000 employees of Israel Air-
craft Industries would be laid

off as a result of Sunday's
cabinet decision.
One of the principal poli-
tical casualties of the decision
is likely to former Israel Am-
bassador to the United States
Moshe Arens, a former
Defense Minister and one of
the most vigorous advocates
of the project.
Immediately after the vote,
he announced that he would
resign from the cabinet, but
later said he would withhold
his resignation while a group
of Likud Party ministers at-
tempt to raise the issue again
and reverse the decision.
One of the prime movers of
this rearguard action is
another former Defense Mini-
ster, Ariel Sharon, who
described Sunday's vote as "a
capitulation to foreigners."
He accused Likud Party
leader Yitzhak Shamir of
having "navigated the
government to a disgrace"
and declared that "some of
Israel's leaders have lost their
direction, have lost their way,
have lost their national
honor." Political observers in
Jerusalem, however, believe
there is little likelihood that
the Likud ministers will suc-
ceed in reversing the decision.

Berman

Continued from Page 1

If Berman's nomination is
accepted by the CJF board
and approved at the General
Assembly, it would highlight
several years of service to the
CJF.
Berman has been a board
member since 1965, a
member of its executive com-
mittee since 1980 and most
recently, a vice president. He
also has been chairing the
organization's long range
strategic planning committee
and, working with City
University of New York,
developed a North American
Jewish Data Bank in 1986,
where Federations and
scholars can access informa-
tion from a range of studies
for utilization in planning
activities.
Berman maintains close in-
volvement with Detroit's
Jewish Welfare Federation,
which he has served as presi-
dent from 1972 to 1975, chair-
man of its executive commit-
tee from 1975 to 1978 and
again from 1981 to 1983,
chairman of the United
Jewish Charities endowment
committee, president of
United Hebrew Schools and a
co-founder of what was the
Junior Division in 1946. He
received the Jewish com-

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