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August 21, 1987 - Image 68

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1987-08-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I ENTERTAINMENT

dining room, carry-out and trays

• breakfast • lunch • dinner
"11• after-theater • kiddie menu

open tuesdays thru sundays
10 am. to 11 p.m.

Talk Show Host's Probing
Came From His Heritage

968-0022

lincoln shopping center, 10 1/2 mile & greenfield, oak park

Deli Unique

AUDREE P. KOENIGSBERG

1967-39991

25290 GREENFIELD North of 10 Mile Rd.

CATERING FOR ALL OCCASIONS

'UAL TOA-40.

A Tradition
44 / 7, Gttlfred
._, f Since 1934

..g;ne 2inirz9 and t–ockitti1J
Fred Bayne at the organ nightly

1128 E. Nine Mile Road (11/2 Mile East of 1-75)

(313) 541-2132

Recommended by AAA & Mobile Guides

GOLDEN BOWL

Restaurant
22106 COOLIDGE AT 9 MILE In A & P Shopping Center
398-5502 or 398-5503
DINE IN & CARRY-OUT

SZECHUAN, MANDARIN, CANTONESE & AMERICAN CUISINE

OPEN 1 DAYS-Mon.-Thurs. 11-10, Fri. & Sat. 11-11, Sun. & Holidays 1 p.m. to 10 p.m.

COIN

1

Your Chef: FRANK ENG

• Banquet Facilities

G

OPEN 7 DAYS — YOUR HOST: HOWARD LEW

SZECHUAN, MANDARIN, CANTONESE
AND AMERICAN FOOD

COMPLETE
CARRY-OUT
AVAILABLE

24480 W. 10 MILE

West of Telegraph

(IN TEL-EX PLAZA)
353-7848

TNE GPEAT WALE

SERVING YOUR FAVORITE EXOTIC
DRINKS & CHOICE COCKTAILS

I

PRIVATE DINING ROOM
• BANQUETS • PARTIES • BUSINESS MEETINGS I

Your host . . . HENRY LUM

Businessmen's Luncheons • Carry outs • Catering

35135 Grand River, Farmington
(Drakeshire Shopping Center)

476-9181

HOA KOW INN

Specializing In Cantonese, Szechuan & Mandarin Foods

Open Daily 11 to 10:30, Sat. 11 to 12 Mid., Sun. 12 to 10:30
— Carry-Out Service —

13715 W. 9 MILE, W. of Coolidge • Oak Park

KING LIM'S GARDEN

Mandarin, Szechuan & Cantonese Food

26196 GREENFIELD, LINCOLN CENTER. OAK PARK

Mon.-Thurs. 11 to 10:30
Fri. 11 to 11, Sat. 11 to 12
Sun. 12 noon to 10

968-3040

Carry - Out Service
Catering To Parties Available

547-4663

OPEN 7 DAYS
A WEEK

NEW KING
LIM'S

:3305 Auburn Rd.

852.8280

Exotic Cocktails

KOW KOW INN

• Famous Chop Suey • Cantonese Food • Steaks • Chops • Sea Food
OPEN Mon.-Sat. 11 a.m.-12:30 a.m., Sun. & Holidays 12 Noon-12:30 a.m.

CARRY OUT SERVICE

EASY PARKING

322 W. McNichols Bet. Woodward & Second

868-7550

K

ansas City — Radio
talk show host Larry
King, known for his
skillful interviewing, was en-
couraged as a boy in his
Brooklyn, N.Y. Jewish home
to ask questions and express
himself.
"The Jewish heritage
teaches you to question," he
explained. "It didn't ask us as
children to accept what the
rabbi said as gospel or even
what the Old Testament said
as gospel. It taught us to ask.
We were urged to ask."
But King, who changed his
name from Larry Zeiger
when he became an on-air
personality, said his ability to
interview isn't only cultural.
"I think I was just born
with curiosity. I'm always
asking questions, always
wondering about things," he
explained. "I don't know how
much of that is from being
Jewish. It's part of my
culture, part of my makeup,
but not every Jew is a good
question-asker. It certainly
gave me an ingredient to be
open to ask."
On his late-night radio talk
show, King interviews guests
from all walks of life. Some
subjects lend themselves to
frivolity, others to highly
serious matters. The first two
hours are for the guest inter-
view and listener questions.
During the second two hours
King expresses his opinions
and fields questions and com-
ments from listeners who call
him.
Often callers will suggest
that his opinions are "a
Jewish kind of thing (to say.)"
"When someone says that,
I don't know what that
means, because I'm my own
thinker, everybody is. I'm not
guided by ' anything. I
disagree with Israel a lot. In
fact, a lot of Jewish people get
mad at me?'
"There's a part of me that
thinks Zionism, sometimes, is
a political movement that
borders on the racist. And if
I feel that way, I say it," King
said.
And although he under-
stands the viewpoint that
some Jews believe they must
defend Israel because of the
struggle that went into
creating its statehood, King

Audree P. Koenigsberg is creative
services editor of The Kansas
City Jewish Chronicle, from
which this piece is reprinted.

feels no allegiance to suppor-
ting every move Israel makes.
"I often disagree with
policies and actions that have
taken place there, especially
in the last five years. But I
don't necessarily defend
America either. The stupidest
statement I've ever heard
about this country is 'my
country, right or wrong.'
That's insane.
"If you believe that, then
Goebbels had a right to do
what Hitler told him to do,
and so did Rommel and so did
Goering. My country, right or
wrong?" he said, questioning
the phrase. "No, I don't sup-
port Israel' out of hand."
He holds other strong
beliefs. "I have an extreme
distaste for prejudice," said
the 53-year-old King.
"Judaism gave me that, so
when I see a Jew who's pre-
judiced, I'm extremely disap-
pointed. More disappointed
than with others, because I
hold a Jew up higher to that?'
It was growing up in
Brooklyn that shaped his
ideals and values. He
remembers the borough as a
"special place" where there
was interdependence and
loyalty throughout the ethnic
mix of peple who lived there.
King was 10 when his

father died. His mother,
whom he described as

religious, raised his brother
and himself in a kosher home.
"I would say it was
Conservative-leaning Or-
thodox," he recalled.
Today, however, King con-
siders himself agnostic. "I
don't know if there is a God.
I go (to the synagogue) on
Yom Kippur as respect to my
parents; they're both dead
now. I like the Jewish epic
and concept, but the God of
the Old Testament is incredi-
ble to me," he said.
Always a kid who voiced his
opinion, King now gets the
opportunity to share his
thoughts through public
speaking engagements where
he enjoys making people
laugh.
King also writes a column
in USA Today and hosts
CNN's Larry King Live. A
new book, Tell It to the King,
will be out in the spring.
In recent years, King's fame
has grown tremendously. He
said he never expected little
Larry Zieger's life to run the
course it has. "I knew he had
the talent. But I never
thought he'd get this far,"
King said.

Copyright 1987, JTA, Inc.

Versatile Mel Torme
Swings Into Academy

MICHAEL ELKIN

Special to The Jewish News

Others have always been able
to make book on Mel Torme,
whether asking him to enter-
tain as a singer, pen a new song
as a composer ("Chestnuts
roasting on an open fire. . ."),
drum up a storm as a drummer,
or act up in film (Higher and
Higher) and television (Night

Court).

Now, appropriately, Ibrme is
making book on himself. "I'm
just putting the finishing
touches on my autobiography,"
says the - honey-voiced per-
former known to his discomfort
as the "Velvet Fog!'
At 61, Torme, the Jewish
music maven, hasn't lost a beat.
"I'm in the process of arranging
an orchestral tribute to Benny
Goodman," says Torme, adding
with nary a pause for a breath,
"and I've just embarked on the
biography of Buddy Rich!"
Indeed, says 'Ibrme, "it was
one of Buddy's last requests
that I write the book about
him. And, in between all that,
I'll still have some time to

Mel Torme

devote to my gun collection!'
Torme is a noted gun buff.
There was a time when
Torme was perceived as quick
on the trigger, eager to fire
back verbally at the slightest
provocation. But that was years
ago; it is not only the voice that
has matured.
But then not every youngster
was under the gun like little
Melvin Howard 'Ibrme, who
sang his first song at 10 months

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