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July 31, 1987 - Image 56

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1987-07-31

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

NEW LOCATION
OPENING SOON
WEST BLOOMFIELD
PLAZA

ENTERTAINMENT

C A /

WAFFLE
WAFFLE
OMELETTE
OMELETTE

•o\-° s
\G\
k ‘e

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dap

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THREE
GREAT Buy one plain waffle or omelette
LOCATIONS with toast and jelly ... get one

15600 W. 10 Mile Rd.
Southfield • 552-1100
28505 Northwestern • Southfield • 357-2q09
29556 Orchard Lake • Farmington Nils • 626 0804
1

Continued from preceding page

FREE I

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Valid Monday through Friday only

No slihslMira.m 'Exp.

8-31-87

J

CAFE KATON

23055 COOLIDGE NEAR 9 MILE RD. • Oak Park • 547-3581
A STRICTLY KOSHER RESTAURANT FEATURING
PIZZA AND FELAFEL

Q. What Does The Circle K
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A. Both Are Nationally-Recognized
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WHAT ARE YOUR KOSHER NUTRITIONAL mounts?

Send Letters To: Questions and Answer Dept., 23055 Coolidge. Suitable
Questions Will Be Answered In This Column.
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and chairperson Jerry Soble,
who is head of the cultural
arts committee, are planning
three very different art ex-
hibits. One will feature
Jewish women sculptors from
around the world who will be
present to show their work in
spring. About eight Israeli ar-
tists have so far agreed to
bring their works to a special
show, and an exhibit of
Jewish • antiquities is
planned.
The Celebration of Jewish
Humor set for February 1988,
will feature comedian Yakov
Smirnoff; Eddie Cantor's
daughter; Marilyn, who will
bring films and talk about
her father; Sholem
Aleichem's daughter, Bel
Kaufman, author of Up the
Down Staircase; Las Vegas
and Broadway star Marilyn
Michaels, who will perform
with her mother, Fraydele
Aysher, star of the Yiddish
stage.
"We are still waiting to
hear from Gilda Radner and
from Joel Grey who we hope
will come to talk about his
father, Mickey Katz," said
Mrs. Silver.
Also next February, in
honor of Jewish Music.
Month, Annette Chajes has
planned a special concert in
the Julius Chajes Music Fund
Concert series. World
renowned cellist Paul Olef-
sky, formerly first cellist with
the Detroit Symphony, and
concert star and soprano
recording artist Pauline
Stark will perform art songs
and compositions of Jewish
composers, including the
works of the late Julius
Chajes.
Mrs. Silver is working on
the Jevirish Film Festival
with chairman Bernie Kent,
and co-chairmen Nina
Scheyer and Donna Sklar and
volunteers are already hard
at work on 1988 Book Fair.
Book Fair alone attracts in
excess of 25,000 people year-
ly, with 67 organizations co-
sponsoring. It is the oldest,
largest and most prestigious
Jewish book fair in the coun-
try and authors ask to come
to speak here.
While Mrs. Silver oversees
a staff of about 25 volunteers
each week, for Book Fair the
number increases to 150-200.
"We have a larger volunteer
staff for a major exhibit or art
show, as well," she said.
Mrs. Silver is an avid
reader, and reads a minimum
of a book a week. "I used to
do a lot better," she said. "I
was reading three, to four
books a week. Now I don't
unless I'm on vacation."
Books for each year's fair
must be of Jewish content,
though not necessarily writ-

ten by a Jew, and must have
been published since
November of the preceding
year. Volunteers read year
'round to determine books for
the fair and Silver attends
the American Bookseller's
Convention in May to select
books and authors and work
out the logistics of scheduling
them. By Labor Day the pro-
gram is set and to the printer.
In addition to the volunteer
cadre, Mrs. Silver's staff is
comprised of assistant
cultural arts director, Esther
Tuchklaper, Annette Chajes,
librarian Ann Parker and a
secretary.
"There are no nine to 5
hours here," said Mrs. Silver.
"It's what it takes to do the
job well. If there is a program
we are here — evenings,
weekends." During Book
Fair 9 a.m.-11 p.m. hours are
commonplace.
Mrs. Silver said her family
has been very supportive of
her job and has encouraged
her to do it, especially her
parents, Bernard and Fannie
Luchtan. Prior to taking this
job, Mrs. Silver had worked
part time at the Center for
about ten years working in
every department from ad-
ministration to the Jewish
Parents Institute where she
taught Sunday school. "I had
worked on Book Fair and
really loved it. I was
psychologically ready to work
full-time and thought I'd real-
ly enjoy doing it." With her
typical good humor she says
that her husband of 32 years,
Cyril, "didn't really marry a
geisha girl" and that she took
the job when her two
children, Sandra Glazier and
Neil, "weren't coming home
for lunches any more." Both
children are now practicing
attorneys and Mrs. Silver has
two grandchildren, Michael
and Zachary, sons of Sandra
and husband, Manny.
She said she has no
autograph collection of the
famous people she has met,
aid her family has never re-
quested any. "They don't
think of them as famous peo-
ple. Mom goes off to work and
when she comes home she'll
do what moms and wives do.
And sometimes I do and
sometimes I don't," she
laughed, "which is also true
of other moms."
Mrs. Silver said the most
frustrating thing about her
job is not having a theater
when she knows she is going
to have a crowd and doesn't
have enough space to put
them. "The next most
frustrating is when I know I
have a good product to sell,
but the person is an
unknown. We are used to giv-
ing a party and not knowing

who'll be attending," she
said.
What are some of the
unusual happenings that are
just part of a day's work? A
couple of times Mrs. Silver
has literally lost speakers.
Simon Wiesenthal checked
out early and left town before
schedule, frightening those
who went to his hotel to take
him to the airport. Howard
Cosell's secretary changed
his flight plans and he came
in early, unbeknownst to the
staff. When Ida Kaminska, a
Yiddish actress, wasn't on the
plane at Metro, Mrs. Silver
called her home to find she
had been hospitalized with a
nervous breakdown. Gloria
Goldreich's husband called
from New York looking for
his wife, who hadn't return-
ed from an engagement in
Detroit. Mrs. Silver was
relieved to learn later that
Goldreich had gone grocery
shopping before returning
home. And once a speaker
slept in the hotel lobby, too
polite to call Mrs. Silver.
"Dan Kurzman's plane was
late," said Mrs. Silver, "and
although we had pre-paid his
room, the hotel had given up
his reservation a _ t midnight.
He didn't want to wake or
bother anyone. Now someone
accompanies a guest to make
certain the room is ready."
All in a weekends' work,
but Mrs. Silver loves it. "If
anyone knew how vital, fun
and exciting this department
is they'd be knocking the door
down to help out," said Mrs.
Chajes. "Everyone, paid and
volunteer, gets some
headaches and some
nachas."



u-I GOING PLACES

I'm

Continued from preceding page

CHILDREN

SOUTHFIELD PUBLIC
LIBRARY
26000 Evergreen, special
children's program, 2:30
p.m. each Wednesday,
through Aug. 19, 354-5342
or 354-9100.
JEWISH COMMUNITY
CENTER
6600 W. Maple, West
Bloomfield, Snow White
and the Seven Dwarfs, 11
a.m. and 7:30 p.m. Tuesday,
admission, 661-1000 ext.
342.
STAGE CRAFTERS
YOUTH THEATRE
PROGRAM
415 S. Lafayette, Royal
Oak, Snow White and the
Seven Dwarfs, 7:30 p.m.
today, 10 a.m. and 2 p.m.

Continued on Page 54

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