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July 24, 1987 - Image 66

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1987-07-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

IINI SCtill t)

!ENTERTAINMENT

dining room, carry-out and trays

• breakfast • lunch • dinner'
• after-theater • kiddie menu

open tuesdays thru sundays
10 a.m. to 11 p.m.

968-0022

lincoln shopping center, 101/2 mile & greenfieid, oak park

VAL

Tcotw,

A Tradition
Since 1934



c)(146
,
I
_gine 2 )ininq and Gockluih

MICHAEL ELKIN

Fred Bayne at the organ nightly

Special To the Jewish News

1128 E. Nine Mile Road (1 1/2 Mile East of 1-75)

Recommended by AAA & Mobile Guides

(313) 541-2132

GOLDEN BOWL

Restaurant
221% COOLIDGE AT 9 MILE In A & P Shopping Center
DINE IN & CARRY-OUT
398-5502 or 398-5503

SZECHUAN, MANDARIN, CANTONESE & AMERICAN CUISINE

OPEN 1 DAYS-Man.-11ors. 11-10, Fri. & Sat. 11-11, Sun. & Holidays 1 p.m. to 10 p.m.

• Banquet Facilities

Your Chef: FRANK ENG

4,

1(

COMPLETE \,
CARRY-OUT
AVAILABLE

THE GOLD COIN

OPEN 7 DAYS — YOUR HOST: HOWARD LEW

SZECHUAN, MANDARIN, CANTONESE
AND AMERICAN FOOD

24480 W. 10 MILE (IN TEL-EX PLAZA)

West of Telegraph

353-7848

ThE GPEAT WEL

SERVING YOUR FAVORITE EXOTIC
DRINKS & CHOICE COCKTAILS

PRIVATE DINING ROOM

• BANQUETS • PARTIES • BUSINESS MEETINGS I

Your host . . . HENRY LUM

Businessmen's Luncheons • Carry outs • Catering

35135 Grand River, Farmington
(Drakeshire Shopping Center)

476-9181

HOA KOW INN

Open Daily 11 to 10:30, Sat. 11 to 12 Mid., Sun. 12 to 10:30

KING LIM'S GARDEN

Mandarin, Szechuan & Cantonese Food

26196 GREENFIELD, LINCOLN CENTER. OAK PARK

Mon.-Thurs. 11 to 10:30
Fri. 11 to 11, Sat. 11 to 12
Sun. 12 noon to 10

968-3040

Carry - Out Service
Catering To Parties Available

547-4663

OPEN 7 DAYS
A WEEK

NEW KING
LIM'S

3305 Auburn Rd.

852.8280

Exotic Cocktails

FLOWN IN FRESH
---- 1
EXPRESSLY FOR YOUR DINING

at
the

ENGLISH DOVER SOLE
KINGSLEY INN 642-0100

KOW KOW INN

• Famous Chop Suey • Cantonese Food • Steaks • Chops • Sea Food
OPEN Mon.-Sat. 11 a.m.-12:30 a.m., Sun. & Holidays 12 Noon-12:30 a.m.

CARRY OUT SERVICE

EASY PARKING

322 W. McNichols Bet. Woodward & Second

66

FRIDAY, JULY 24, 1987

She was a Jewish kid from
Honolulu with a volcanic
mouth. But like any active
volcano that spouts off and
draws attention, flame-haired
Bette Midler, the Divine Miss
M, sparks where others
spritz.
The outrageous performer,
who started out her profes-
sional cabaret act as a singer
in a gay bathhouse, is awash
with fortune these days. She
is co-star in the successful
flick Outrageous Fortune.
"I could always work for
myself," says an independent
Midler, the 42-year-old earth
mother who recently gave
birth to a Divine Miss S,
Sophie. (No, says Midler, she
and her husband, perform-
ance artist/commodities
trader Harry Kipper, didn't
name the kid after idol
Sophie Tucker. That's just a
coincidence, she says.)
"You should always become
independent; you should al-
ways try to work at a little
something that you can take
out on the road. Because that
is something to fall back on."
If Midler is to fall, she can
afford plenty of cushions to
soften the blow. She just
signed a three-part film deal
with the Disney Studio,
whose Touchstone Pictures is
responsible for her Outrage-
ous Fortune as well as Ruth-
less People and Down and

Out in Beverly Hills.

Specializing In Cantonese, Szechuan & Mandarin Foods

— Carry-Out Service —
13715 W. 9 MILE, W. of Coolidge • Oak Park

The Divine Miss M. Sparkles,
Accelerating Cinema Success

868-7550

Midler down and out? No
way. But, says the vivacious
performer, geting to life's
sweet fruit occasionally
means nipping at the bitter.
"You learn that it's not all
peaches and cream," she says,
"and you learn to roll with
the punches, not to take it
too personally, to get up on
your feet and keep going. The
main thing is perseverance."
She means what she says.
After leaving her native
Honolulu 22 years ago, Mi-
dler showed she meant busi-
ness to the show business
world. Within a relatively
short period of time, she had
snared the role of Tzeitel in
the Broadway production of

Fiddler on the Roof.

She scratched a seven-year
performer's itch with a
Grammy Award, capturing
the 1972 prize for her album,
The Divine Miss M. Six years
later, she captured an
Academy Award nomination
for The Rose.
Life has blossomed since.
Three hit films in a row have
made producers aware that
the woman once dubbed as
"Trash With Flash" is no

Bette Midler appears with George Carlin in a scene from "Outrageous
Fortune."

longer a flash in the pan.
Pan? It is a word that doesn't
exist in a career heaped with
praise.
Despite the image of a wild
woman with enough energy
to wipe out Philadelphia
Electric — an image seem-
ingly toned down since film
fame and motherhood —
there is a very definite seri-
ous side to Midler. One has
only to read her A View
From a Broad, a perceptive
and an alternately raucous
and sensitive book, to gain
some true insights.
Like about her trip to West
Germany, where the Jewish
entertainer felt some strains
from the past creep into the
present. "Did I really believe
that bygones should be
bygones?" she explained.
The serious side is no reve-
lation for those close to Mi-

dler. "Offstage," Midler has
said, "I am basically a seri-
ous, sentimental, frequently
maudlin person — the com-
plete opposite of the wild,
zany hedonist I play on stage.
I'm really two people, a
schizoid personality.
"Look at me, I wear glas-
ses. I look like a librarian
and behave like a school-
teacher, which is even
worse."
She seems to be behaving
herself more these days —
but then fame does have its
responsibilities. After all,
there has been so much —
innumerable club perform-
ances, stints on Broadway,
records — and now film.
Midler seems to be well on
her way to meeting her goal,
as stated to her manager in
1972. Her goal? That of
legend.

Reflecting On Jewish
Roles In Movieland

Five Hollywood figures explored their
Jewish identity — or lack of it — and
how it affects their craft.

TOM TUGEND

Special to The Jewish News

L

os Angeles — "Sure,

there's anti-Semitism,"
said one panelist, r"but
most of us avoid it by being
in a business where we're sur-
rounded by Jews."
The business is making
Hollywood films, and five of
its more successful practi-
tioners got together at a cam-
pus forum to explore their
Jewish identity, or lack of it,
and how it affects their craft.
Met at UCLA Hillel were
actor Richard Dreyfuss

("Jaws," "Close Encounters,"
"Down and Out in Beverly
Hills"); actor Henry Winkler,
who raised a whole TV gener-
ation as the Fonz in "Happy
Days"; director-actor Paul
Mazursky ("Harry and rIbn-
to," "Moscow on the Hudson,"
"Down and Out in Beverly
Hills"); and producer Irwin
Winkler ("Rocky I, II and
III," " 'Round Midnight").
The moderator was Jeremy
Kagan, a rabbi's son and
director-writer of "The Big
Fix" and "The Chosen:'
A casting director could
hardly have done a better job

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