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July 24, 1987 - Image 13

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1987-07-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Ifrfti.41WW-41k$41, 1Wftwift40-4W140.**401k:

.
Judy duslander, i.d.s.

interior designer

balah and the origins of the
kibbutz movement in Haifa
University's department of
education. And in the tradition
of his former teacher at He-
brew University, Gershom
Sholem, Tzur is a philosopher
of Labor Zionism.
"I believe Zionism is the
political expression of the
Jewish people of this century
which means, for the Jews, the
possibility to express them-
selves in this world demo-
cratically. I don't believe in a
totalitarian Jewish state. This
is not possible."
Tzur defined modern
Zionism as "a way of analyzing
the Jewish condition, a disci-
pline of thinking; looking de-
eply into the sociological condi-
tions of the Jews and taking
seriously the possibility of the
destruction of the Jewish
people."
Although
traditional
Zionists thought the estab-
lishment of Israel would solve
the Jewish problem, the persis-
tence of the Diaspora is a chal-
lenge to modern Zionism, Tzur
said.
"Israel is the most important
laboratory of the Jewish
people. But it is not the happy
ending of the Jewish people.
It's the beginning of a new
phase of a very difficult self-
searching," Tzur said.
Among the major problems
facing the state currently and
throughout its short history is
the ongoing Arab-Israeli con-
flict, a problem which man-
dates a democratic solution ac-
cording to Tzur.
"I don't believe that the con-
flict is eternal. I don't believe
peace is eternal," he said. "I
personally believe we should
avoid any kind of false mes-
sianic ideas in the sense of be-
lieving we can make peace to-
morrow morning."
But Tzur has no easy solu-
tions. "The important thing for
me in the long run is that Israel
must be a democratic society. If
the West Bank will be Israel,
we have to give (the Palesti-
nians) full rights and pay the
consequences or create an in-
dependent political entity with
all the costs."
The peace process should fol-
low what Tzur called a natural
sociological pattern in which
the Palestinians in the West
Bank would move closer to
Jordan.
"I personally feel that we
should prepare ourselves not to
map out solutions but to try to
see where we want to arrive
and move towards peace with
the Arabs."
Tzur also addressed the
problems plaguing kibbutzim,
their economic crisis and the
questions raised about hiring
outside laborers.
Hired labor, especially Arab
labor, to do many of the menial
tasks, remains an ongoing di-
lemma .

Copyright 1987, JTA,

Inc

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THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

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