100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

The University of Michigan Library provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes. These materials may be under copyright. If you decide to use any of these materials, you are responsible for making your own legal assessment and securing any necessary permission. If you have questions about the collection, please contact the Bentley Historical Library at bentley.ref@umich.edu

July 03, 1987 - Image 20

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1987-07-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

NEWS

Power Struggle

Continued from Page 1

dared, were they prepared to
play the role of junior partner
within the Jewish Agency.
The Board of Governors in-
sisted that Arye Dulzin, who
is chairman of the Jewish
Agency as well as of the
World Zionist Organization
(WZO), not run for reelection
when his terms of office end
in December. The board, long
critical of Dulzin's resistance
to change, seized on his im-
plication in a financial scan-
dal involving Bank Leumi to
make their move last
February.
"The Diaspora fundraisers
showed that they were deter-
mined to take a lot more con-
trol of the Jewish Agency and
that they were prepared to
run a tough show,' said a

You deserve a

SUMMER HEALTH
CLUB MEMBERSHIP

July and August only
$135 / 2 months, $90 / 1 month

Grappling With A
Definition Of 'Zionist'

Must be paid in full.
Jewish Community Center of Metropolitan Detroit
6600 West Maple Road
For more information, call 661-1000, extension 265.

,

01*



-;:

SLEEK AND SENSUOUS, IT MOVES
WITH A SILENT RUSH OF V-12 POWER.
THIS IS THE STUFF OF LEGENDS.

THE 1988 JAGUAR XJ-S

A true thoroughbred, the XJ-S is powered by
Jaguar's overhead cam, fuel-injected V-12, an
engine proven in international endurance racing
and millions of highway miles.
The XJ-S is also a truly elegant Grand Touring
car, built to Jaguar's highest standards of hand-
crafted luxury. Its interior is graced by seats covered

643-6900

1815 MAPLELAWN. TROY

20

FRIDAY, JULY 3, 1987

with supple top grain leather, rich polished burl
walnut in the dashboard, console and door panels
and a wealth of thoughtful amenities.
The 1988 V-1 2, Jaguar XJ-S is truly the stuff of
legends. It is covered by an extensive three year/
36,000 mile warranty and Jaguar's new Service-
On Sites'`' Roadside Assistance Plan. For details on
this uniquely comprehensive plan and Jaguar's
limited warranty, applicable in the USA and
Canada, see your Jaguar dealer.

ENJOY TOMORROW. BUCKLE UP TODAY.

JAGUAR XJ-S

BETWEEN CROOKS AND COOLIDGE
OPEN MONDAY AND
THURSDAY UNTIL 9 P.M.

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

senior source in the Zionist
establishment. "They really
humiliated Dulzin."
The victory that the "fund-
raisers" notched up, though,
had a price. Relations bet-
ween the Israelis, referred to
as the "Zionists" and the
"fundraisers"—particularly
between Dulzin and Jerrold
Hoffberger, chairman of the
Jewish Agency Board of
Governor — took a nosedive.
Voices within the Zionist
camp reportedly demanded
that "Hoffberger be paid back
in kind" and ousted from the
chairmanship, preferably in a
manner that would inflict the
greatest degree of public
humiliation.
Hoffberger, apparently
deeply offended by the hostili-

Jerusalem — Religious
issues were a major topic at
the annual Assembly, which
adopted a resolution affirm-
ing that the Law of Return be
"retained in its present form."
The resolution, carried by a
large majority despite the
vigrorous protests of Rabbi
Louis Bernstein, an
American Orthodox leader,
was a rejection of the Or-
thodox effort to have the
Knesset amend the law to in-
validate conversions perform-
ed by non-Orthodox rabbis.
The resolution referred to
and reaffirmed the text first
adopted by the Assembly in
1985 that warned that "any
change in the Law of Return
may fracture the unity of the
Jewish people."
Another controversial
resolution reaffirmed the
Assembly's determination to
provide funds only to educa-
tional institutions that con-
sider themselves Zionist. But
the resolution did not cite any
specific criteria, and the con-
flict speaks volumes about
the gap between the way
Diaspora Jews think Israel
should be, and the way it real-
ly is.
The story began at the 1985
Jewish Agency Assembly
when a resolution was passed
calling on the Agency to cease
funding "non-Zionist"
schools, yeshivahs and other
such institutions.
The resolution established
a set of criteria (educational
institutions had to fly the
Israeli flag, celebrate In-
dependence Day, support ar-
my service, teach in Hebrew,
among others) and a commit-
tee was established to deter-
mine which institutions met
those criteria and which did
not.

The committee, under the
chairmanship of Jewish
Agency Treasurer Akiva
Lewinsky, held hearings to
which it summoned
spokesmen for the various in-
stitutions which received
Agency money.
And to the surprise of
almost no one in Israel, each
and every spokesman, from
the predominantly
Ashkenazi, ultra-Orthodox
Agudat Yisrael and its
Sephardi counterpart, Shas,
to the dogmatically anti-
religious left insisted that
they qualified.
Stymied, the committee sent
out 650 letters — a kind of
Zionist loyalty oath — that
every institution was obliged
to sign before it could receive
funds.
The move was a disaster.
Both the indisputably Zionist
Hesder Yeshivah movement,
which combines army service
with yeshivah studies, and
the kibbutz movements, with
their impeccable Zionist
credentials, simply refused to
sign.
Such a demand, they in-
sisted, was insulting.
So, last week the resolution
went back to the drawing
boards. Some Diaspora
delegates were bluntly
critical of the committee, ac-
cusing it of lacking the will to
carry out its appointed task
and calling for a new commit-
tee to tackle the job.
There were some backroom
murmurings that the com-
mittee's stunning failure to
find a single non-Zionist in-
stitution had much to do with
the anxiety of the Labour Par-
ty — in the - person of Akiva
Lewinsky — not to offend the
religious parties.

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan