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July 03, 1987 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1987-07-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE JEWISH NEWS

THIS ISSUE 60c

SERVING DETROIT'S JEWISH COMMUNITY

JULY 3, 1987 / 6 TAMMUZ 5747

Furor Mounts Over Pope's
Meeting With Waldheim

Jews and non-Jews around the world react with anger
to papal audience at the Vatican with accused Nazi

LEADER
OF THE
PAC's

A SMALLER
PERSPECTIVE

A HOT
NEW
WAVE
FOR
SINGLES

CONTENTS PAGE 1

New York (JTA) — Weeks of pro-
test and dismay over the decision by
Pope John Paul II to receive Kurt
Waldheim turned to outrage after the
meeting last week. Jewish leaders
were aghast as the Pontiff not only
blessed the Austrian President, who
is accused of complicity in Nazi
atrocities, but praised him as an
outstanding diplomat who always
worked for peace.
In Detroit, Jewish Community
Council President Leon Cohan said
•he was "distressed, dismayed and
disappointed" by the Pope's audience
with Waldheim. He said that the
Council will discuss what its role will
be in Pope John Paul's visit to Detroit
in September.
Cohan ruled out severing contacts
with the Catholic Church and ties
with the local Catholic community in
protest of the meeting.
At the Jewish Community Center
this week, local Jews voiced anger at
the meeting: `It's a slap in the face to
the JeWs," said Aaron Sinkoff.
Many whospoke to The Jewish
News were unhappy about the
meeting, but felt resigned that there
was nothing Detroit's Jews could have
done to prevent it, and there is
nothing to be done now.

"Isn't it over?" Bea Schaurien
asked rhetorically. "What else could
we have done? We were out-
numbered."
"The (Austrian) people did elect
(VValdheim)," Ethel Traurig pointed
out. "That to me is a bigger crime."
A discussion then ensued among
the members of the Center seniors
game club about what Detroiters
should do when the Pope comes to
visit. Some said the Pope should be

ignored, while others called for
picketing.
One woman, who asked not to be
identified, cautioned against too
strong a reaction against the Pope.
"You can't ignore him," she said. "You
tell him you're displeased, but you
don't cut off relations. The Pope has
too much power for us to cut off rela-
tions with him."
Harsh criticism of the Pope could

Continued on Page 16

Power Struggle Grows
Within Jewish Agency

Zionists were pitted against fund raisers
at the annual Assembly in Jerusalem

HELEN DAVIS

Special to The Jewish News

Jerusalem — No fewer than 400
delegates and about 600 observers
from every continent crowded into
Jerusalem last week for what some
believed would be the most fiery
Jewish Agency Assembly in years.
But those expecting confrontation
were disappointed.
There were no shocks and few sur-

prises. The angry atmosphere that
marked the Agency's Board of Gover-
nors' meetings in February seemed to
have melted away under a hot sum-
mer sun.
Six months ago, the Diaspora
leaders—the so-called "non-Zionists"
or "fundraisers" (or even "goyim," as
they are sometimes disparagingly
referred to in Jerusalem)— flexed
their muscles. No longer, they de-

Continued on Page 20

EXPLOITING
HATRED

Michigan white
supremacists
keep hatred
of Jews
atop their agenda

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