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June 26, 1987 - Image 30

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1987-06-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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JUNE 26, 1987

MY DEAR BELOVED WIFE ROSE:

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AS ALWAYS-WITH ALL MY LOVE

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THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

Congress Wants A Larger Say
In American Middle East Policy

JAMES DAVID BESSER

Special to The Jewish News

L

egislation to close the

U.S. offices of the Pal
estine Liberation
Organization, announced with
considerable fanfare last
month, has disappeared into
the void of various Mayers com-
mittees on both sides of the
Capitol. Meanwhile, there are
indications that the Ad-
ministration may be about to
launch a preemptive strike as
part of the continuing conflict
over the role of Congress in
Middle East decision-making.
According to Dale Tate, press
aide to Sen. Robert Dole (R-KS)
said that the PLO closing bill
"is just sitting there in the
Foreign Relations Committee.
Basically, we're just waiting to
see if anything gets scheduled
on the bill. If it doesn't, Senator

Dole may bring it up later in
the summer when the Senate
begins working on the State
Department authorization bill.
Then, he may choose to bring
up the PLO closing as an
amendment?'
On the House side, the
measure introduced by presi-
dential candidate Jack Kemp
(R-NY) is similarly bogged
down, with no action currently
scheduled.
But Administration moves
may be in the offing. There is
widespread expectation that
the Justice Department may
order the PLO's Washington of-
fice closed, while allowing the
New York office to remain open
— a concession apparently
designed to 'avoid a, battle
before the World Court. The
prime mover in this initiative
is Attorney General Edwin
Meese, according to numerous
reports, with significant input

from the State Department.
There is more to the story
than just the Administration's
desire to avoid diplomatic pro-
blems that might arise from the
PLO office-closing measures
now before Congress. Congress
wants a greater voice in setting
Middle East policy, especially
as the nation inches toward
potentially dangerous confron-
tation in the Persian Gulf. At
the same time, the Reagan ad-
ministration, rocked by the
Iran-Contra fiasco, is eager to
regain the initiative in Middle
East diplomacy and
policymaking.
This power struggle may well
be the real motive behind any
Administration decision to
press ahead with its own plan
to shut down the PLO, an ac-
tion that will be based on the
group's alleged violations of the
Foreign Agents Registration
Act. Before final action is

WASHINGTON IN BRIEF

Museum
Design Approved

Washington (JTA) — The
design for the United States
Holocaust Memorial Museum
was approved last week by the
federal Commission of Fine
Arts clearing the way for con-
struction to begin later this
year.
The approval comes about a
month after the 'museum's
design was rejected for being
too imposing. The Commission
objected to the museum's
hexagonal-shaped memorial,
the Hall of Remembrance,
which they said protruded too
far into the street.
Architect James Freed, of the
firm of I.M. Pei, admitted that
he initially thought that chang-
ing the memorial's design
would destroy its symbolism.
But by shrinking the size of the
Hall of Remembrance, and pull-
ing it further into line with the
adjacent government buildings,
he created a design he liked
even more.
"We now had an opportunity
we didn't have before; namely,
wonderful landscape. This
could be a wonderful urban
garden on the (Washington)
Mall," Freed said. "It has its
own identity as a part of the
Mall and it's also abstract!'
New York State Sen. Roy
Goodman (R-Manhattan), a
member of the Commission,
noted that Freed's revisions
"embodied our major objections
and in its present form, the
museum designs are acceptable
and will a be great asset to the
community?'
But controversy over the

Holocaust museum, which was
approved by Congress in 1979,
remains. Some Holocaust sur-
vivors are still questioning
whether the museum, which
will be five stories and feature
a learning center, library and
archives, is appropriate for a
tragedy such as the Holocaust.

Soviet Jewish
Unit Denounces
Emigrant Route

Washington (JTA) —The
Union of Councils for Soviet
Jews (UCSJ) denounced last
week a proposal that Soviet
Jewish emigrants go directly to
Israel through Rumania.
"The plan would deny the
emigres' right to select the
United States or other Western
nations as their destination of
first choice, as guaranteed by
international human rights
treaties," the UCSJ said.
The UCSJ position was out-
lined in an Op-Ed article in The
New York Times by Pamela
Cohen, the organization's presi-
dent, and Micah Naftalin, its
Washington representative, and
was reiterated in a separate
statement by Cohen.
While calling the proposal an
"Israeli plan," the UCSJ
criticism was aimed at the
negotiations held with Soviet
officials last March in Moscow
by Edgar Bronfman, president
of the World Jewish Congress
(WJC), and Morris Abram,
president of the National Con-
ference on Soviet Jewry (NCSJ)
and chairman of the Con-
ference of Presidents of Major

Jewish
American
Organizations.
They negotiated a procedure
by which Soviet Jews would fly
to Israel through Rumania
rather than the current route
through. Vienna. Although all
Soviet Jews leave the USSR
with visas for Israel, most go to
some other country, chiefly the
U.S.

U.S. To Resubmit
Saudi Missile
Sale Proposal

Washington (JTA) — National
Security Advisor Frank Carluc-
ci said last week that the
Reagan Administration would
resubmit its proposal to sell
Maverick air-to-ground missiles
to Saudi Arabia. The announce-
ment came only five days after
the Administration withdrew
the proposed sale in the face of
almost certain defeat in the
Senate.
In a speech before the poli-
tical action conference of the
National Association of Ameri-
can Arabs, Carlucci said there
must be "an American will-
ingness to continue to accept
our major role" in the Persian
Gulf.
He did not elaborate on the
missile proposal or say when it
would be resubmitted. He con-
tended that opposition to the
sale and to U.S. protection of
Kuwaiti tankers in the Persian
Gulf was sending the "wrong
signal" to U.S. allies in the
region and could become "an in-
vitation to the Iranians and
Soviets:'

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