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June 19, 1987 - Image 32

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1987-06-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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JEWISH ASSOCIATION FOR RETARDED CITIZENS

Pollard Case Generates Odd Quirks

Despite hard feelings generated by the Pollard case,
the U.S. and Israel have an overriding mutual interest

WOLF BLITZER

Special to The Jewish News

ashington — There
have been some
strange quirks in the
latest twists and turns in the
Jonathan Jay Pollard spy
scandal.
Incredible as it may sound,
both Israeli Air Force Colonel
Aviem Sella, who has been in-
dicted as Pollard's first
"handler" in Washington, and
U.S. Attorney-General Edwin
Meese, who ultimately is
responsible for prosecuting
Sella, are now represented by
the same Washington at-
torney, Nathan Lewin.
Pollard's parents, Dr. and
Mrs. Morris Pollard of South
Bend, Indiana, also got a new
attorney to help in their son's
appeal for a possible sentence
reduction. Alan Dershowitz,
the famed Harvard Universi-
ty legal scholar, has agreed to
help the former civilian naval
intelligence analyst who is
currently serving a life
sentence in a federal prison in
Springfield, Missouri.
The Pollard affair clearly re-
mains a bone stuck in the
throat of the Americans, yet
by all accounts, it does not
appear to have had any
serious impact on the level of
day-to-day cooperation be-
tween the two countries in
intelligence-sharing, political

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terest in not allowing the
Pollard case to overly damage
American-Israeli relations.
This also helps to explain
why the public U.S. response
to the release of the two
Israeli reports on Pollard was
muted. The U.S. Justice
Department did not issue any
formal reaction. At the State
Department, a spokesman
simply expressed hope that
the Israeli government will
take the necessary steps to
make certain that a Pollard-
like spy operation can never
recur in Washington.
What was most ironic
about the entire Pollard affair
was the fact that when the
former analyst was arrested
by FBI agents outside the
Israeli Embassy in November
1985, U.S.-Israeli relations, by
any definition, were clearly

WASHINGTON IN BRIEF

for the celebration of our 18th year

at the

Jonathan Pollard: Getting helpi
coordination and military-
strategic planning.
In recent weeks, several
senior U S military officials
have visited Israel while their
Israeli' colleagues have come
to Washington. A meeting of
the joint U.S.-Israeli military-
political group involved in
strategic cooperation con-
vened in Israel on schedule.
The chief of Israeli military
intelligence, Gen. Amnon
Shahak, came to Washington
where he even met with
Pollard's old boss at U.S.
Naval Intelligence — among
many other senior U.S. in-
telligence officials.
Washington and Jerusalem
recognize that despite the
hard feelings generated by
Israel's successful penetra-
tion of the U.S. intelligence
community, both countries
have an overriding mutual in-

U.S. Attitudes
Hold Steady
On Israel

Washington (JTA) — Ameri-
can attitudes toward Israel
have changed little in the last
20 years, according to a Los
Angeles Times Poll, published
this week.
About half of those inter-
viewed — 48 percent — said
they held the same opinion
about Israel as they did two
decades ago, while 20 percent
reported a less favorable at-
titude and 17 percent a more
favorable one. The other 15
percent had no opinion.
While a strong majority
felt that Israel should give
back at least some territories
and that there should be
peace negotiations with the
Palestine Liberation Organ-
ization, public support for
dealing with the PLO has ac-
tually gone down since the

optimistic days of the 1978
Camp David accord between
Israel and Egypt.
Only 21 percent of those
questioned felt that Israel
should keep all the territory
taken during the Six Day
War. The majority, 61 per-
cent, said Israel should return
at least some of the land.
On Israeli negotiations
with the PLO, 50 percent
were for it, 39 percent
against, and 11 percent held
no opinion. However, eight
years ago, the comparable
figures were 60 percent in
favor and only 29 percent
opposed.
Asked their basic impres-
sion of the present govern-
ment of Israel, respondents
were divided — 37 percent
favorable, 30 percent un-
favorable, and 33 percent not
sure.
The poll was based on
phone interviews with 2,317

American adults during the
. previous four days.

U.S. Scraps Saud
Arms Sale Plan

Washington (JTA) — The
Reagan Administration
scrapped its proposed sale of
1,600 Maverick air-to-ground
missiles to Saudi Arabia last
week in the face of an almost
certain Senate override.
"I think the Administra-
tion realized wisely that the
arithmetic was staring them
in the face on this issue," said
Sen. Jesse Helms (R., N.C.)
who said Senatorial opposi-
tion to the sale might be "the
widest political wing spread
in history."
Sen. Bob Packwood (R.,
Ore), who was leading opposi-
tion to the sale, reported that
he had the 67 votes needed
for a two-thirds majority to
override a Presidential veto.

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