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June 12, 1987 - Image 20

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1987-06-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

___Astmer

AUDETTE CADILLAC INC.

• SALES & LEASING
• LEASE CADILLAC'S
FOR LESS
• THE TIME IS NOW
TO BUY 87's
• THE NEW ALLANTE'
NOW IN STOCK

1

BEEPERS • FAX • TELEX
[313] 474-7777

SUBURBAN
ANSWER ING
SERVICE'

FRED STONE

AUDETTE CADILLAC 7100 Orchard Lake Rd.

851-7200

JUNE ONLY!
20% OFF • ALL

Facial Treatments, Cosmetics
and Skin Care Products

Hunters Square
Farmington Hills
626-1231

facial salon & spa

JUMBOS!

6-MONTH JUMBO CD RATE

6.50 % ster uIg

12-MONTH JUMBO CD RATE

6.850/
6.00%

Contact your
banking
representatives:

Shelly Abel or
Ronald Baskin

435-0420

MONEY MARKET RATE

Certain restrictions may apply. Contact us
for complete details. Rates subject to
change without notice. Good for deposits of
$100,000 or more.

20

Friday, June 12, 1987

NEWS

COMMUNCAT/ONS

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

CLAWSON
330 W. 14 Mile Rd.

LAKE ANGELUS
2986 Walton Blvd.

ROYAL OAK
225 S. Troy St.

FSLIC

tag koosot.•

. A

u s

Govemment Aga.,

Neighborhood

Continued from Page 1

Neighborhood Project."
Lay and professional lead-
ers of the project have also
met with 20 area real estate
agents to explain the pro-
gram, and several of the
realtors have agreed to form
a speakers' bureau to pro-
mote the neighborhoods. In
addition, three residents'
groups have been formed "to
see what' they can do to keep
people coming into the area."
The Neighborhood Project
has done some preliminary
studies of its first year of op-
erations. The 65 home buyers
were "pretty evenly distrib-
uted between Oak Park and
Southfield," Cooper said.
Thirty percent of the pur-
chasers were under the age of
30, 50 percent were 30-40,
and 20 percent were over 40.
Some 75 percent were young
professionals and 50 percent
have children.
"We are trying to get data
on the people who are sell-
ing," Cooper said, but the
project has limited -informa
tion to date. Some 45 percent
of the sellers are "empty nes-
ters" with grown children no
longer living at home and are
moving to condominiums or
out of Michigan, 25 percent
are moving to another home
within the Oak Park and
Southfield boundaries of the
Neighborhood Project, 20 per-
cent are non-resident owners
who are selling, and 10 per-
cent are moving from Oak
Park and Southfield to other
Detroit suburbs.
The first year results "ex-
ceeded by a wide margin my
expectations," said Mark
Schlussel, chairman of the
Neighborhood Project's steer-
ing committee and treasurer
of the Jewish Welfare Feder-
ation. He was pleased by the
community's "enthusiastic re-
ception and the impact it will
have on neighborhood stabili-
ty."Quoting Brandeis Univer-
sity demographer Gary To-
bin, Schlussel said Oak Park
and Southfield, if taken to-
gether, would be the 15th
largest Jewish community in
the United States.
He added that focusing on
the quality of life in South-
field, Oak Park and Hun-
tington Woods, "on the diver-
sity of population —Jew and
non-Jew, white and black"
allows the Jewish community
"to do our part to keep it a
stabilized, integrated
neighborhood and not a
neighborhood in transition."
He said the grant from
UnitedJewish Charities
would be re-evaluated if de-
mand exceeds the funding.
Marty Kraar, executive
vice president of the Jewish
Welfare Federation, was
asked by The Jewish News
about upgrading facilities of

Jewish agencies and services
in the area to match the
commitment to the Jewish
neighborhoods. "The process
has begun to look at what is
needed," Kraar said. "We are
still carving it out, though.
We are trying to see what the
deficits are. The JCC has
been very sensitive to this."
The JCC — the Jewish
Community Center — has
made $145,000 in renovations
and capital improvements at
the Jimmy Prentis Morris
Branch in the last five years.
"It's public knowledge," said
Mort Plotnick, executive vice
president of the JCC, "that
we have been looking at the
possibility of adding 10,000
square feet of space for day
care and the library" at the
Morris Branch. Responding to
long-term communal criti-
cism about inadequate physi-
cal education facilities at the
branch, Plotnick said, "You
have to understand what
money is available and what
kind of choices we have to
make. We are always talking
to the Jewish Welfare Feder-
ation about the possibility" of
adding a swimming pool and
upgrading or expanding the
gymnasium. "We're commit-
ted to JPM (the Morris
Branch) and have expanded
services there," Plotnick said.
Expansion of services has
included the addition of
Torah and exercise classes for
Orthodox women, additional
programming at all age
levels, and construction of a
larger atrium for the coffee
klatch area.

Ice Cream Social

Sunday's ice cream social
at the Jimmy Prentis Morris
Branch of the Jewish Com-
munity Center will have a
"Love Thy Neighborhood"
theme. Open to residents of
Oak Park, Southfield and
Huntington Woods, the event
from 1 to 4 p.m. will include
ice cream, a children's area
for making challah covers,
bookmarks, , edible necklaces
and facepainting, pony rides,
clowns and _relay races, Uri
Segal leading Israeli dancing,
and a performance by the
Southfield-Lathrup Youth
Theater.
There will also be indoor
displays focusing on educa-
tion, cultural and special
events, recreation and other
available city services, as
well as representatives from
area synagogues, Jewish
schools, institutions and
organizations.
The mayors of Oak Park,
Southfield, and Huntington
Woods are scheduled to speak
during a brief formal pro-
gram.

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