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May 22, 1987 - Image 56

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1987-05-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

ENTERTAINMENT

dining room, carry-out and trays

• breakfast • lunch • dinner
• after-theater • kiddie menu

fl

a3fiS P

Continued from preceding page

968-0022

lincoln shopping center, 101/2 mile & greenfield, oak park

'--

On Canvas

open tuesdays thru sundays
10 a.m. to 11 p.m.

Gt1141 A Tradition
/ Since 1934

' titt TOAAA4/ —14
, ,;_,,

-gine 2inin9 and (...ockluih

Fred Bayne at the organ nightly

1128 E. Nine Mile Road (1 1/2 Mile East of 1-75)

Recommended by AAA & Mobile Guides

FUNG LI

(313) 541-2132

'S

SZECHUAN, MANDARIN, CANTONESE & AMERICAN

Mon.-Thurs. 11-10, Fri. & Sat. 11-11, Sun. 12-10

1BANQUET FACILITIES1
CARRY OUT • CATERING
544-1021
8410 W. NINE MILE, W of Livernois

GOLDEN BOWL

Restaurant

22106 COOLIDGE AT 9 MILE hi A & 1). Shopping Center
398-5502 or 398-5503

DINE IN & CARRY-OUT

SZECHUAN, MANDARIN, CANTONESE & AMERICAN CUISINE

OPEN 1 DAYS-Mon.-Thurs. 11-10, Fri. & Sat. 11-11, Sun. & Holidays 1 p.m. to 10 p.m.

Your Chef: FRANK ENG

• Banquet Facilities

0

,-, r : ra



THE GOLD COIN

....
.„

%icl, 14:--2,ii,. *,, . , .

+

COMPLETE
CARRY-OUT
AVAILABLE

OPEN 7 DAYS — YOUR HOST: HOWARD LEW

SZECHUAN, MANDARIN, CANTONESE
AND AMERICAN FOOD

j(

24480 W. 10 MILE (IN TEL-EX PLAZA)

West of Telegraph

353-7848

THE GPEAT WALE

SERVING YOUR FAVORITE EXOTIC
DRINKS & CHOICE COCKTAILS

I

PRIVATE DINING ROOM

• BANQUETS • PARTIES • BUSINESS MEETINGS

I

Your host . . . HENRY LUM

Businessmen's Luncheons • Carry outs • Catering

35135 Grand River, Farmington
(Drakeshire Shopping Center)

/

476-9181

HOA KOW IN-N

Specializing In Cantonese, Szechuan & Mandarin Foods

Open Daily 11 to 10:30, Sat. 11 to 12 Mid., Sun. 12 to 10:30

— Carry-Out Service —

13715 W. 9 MILE, W. of Coolidge • Oak Park

KING LIM'S 'GARDEN

Mandarin, Szechuan & Cantonese Food.

26196 GREENFIELD, LINCOLN CENTER. OAK PARK

Mon.-Thurs. 11 to 10:30
Fri. 11 to 11, Sat. 11 to 12
Sun. 12 noon to 10

.

.

968-3040

Carry - Out Service
Catering To Parties Available

547-4663

OPEN 7 DAYS
A WEEK

NEW KING
LIM'S

3305 Auburn Rd.
852 - 8280
Exotic Cocktails

FLOWN IN FRESH

EXPRESSLY FOR YOUR DINING

at
the

ENGLISH DOVER SOLE
KINGSLEY INN 642 0100

-

KOW KOW INN

• Famous Chop Suey • Cantonese ,Food • Steaks • Chops • Sea Food
OPEN Mon.-Sat. 11 a.m.-12:30 a.m., Sun. & Holidays 12 Noon-12:30 a.m.

CARRY OUT SERVICE

. EASY PARKING

322 W. McNichols Bet.. Woodward & Second

56

Friday, May 22, 1987

868-7550

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

\

change directions to a consid-
erable extent over the years.
Her earlier work, made up
mostly of Daumier-influenced
drawings, plus oils in somber
browns and blacks, is often
focused on human figures.
Later works involve a strong
use of bright, almost-playful
color. Many are abstract.
Others are imaginative land-
scapes, most of them the
streets, deserts, beaches, hills
and cities of Israel.
"My feelings for Israel have
been the prime motivating
force for my later work," says
Mintz, who grew up on De-
troit's northwest side, the
daughter of an amateur ar-
tist, Saul Golden. "Although I
was always very aware I was
Jewish, I never thought of
myself as a : `Jewish artist'
until I saw Israel."
She first visited Israel in
1971, and has made nearly
50 trips back and forth since
then. Now, she and husband,
Dr. Sheldon, spend at least
two-three months out of the
year there. An oral surgeon
at Oakwood Hospital in
Dearborn, he also teaches at
Tel Aviv University and He-
brew University in Jerusalem
during those months.
"We're a little schizop-
hrenic about where we live
now, I think," says Mintz.
"But when we're in Israel, we
feel as if we live there. We
have a group of friends, an
apartment. I go shopping. I
cook. I work. My husband
goes to work. It's not like
being on - vacation. Just like-
everybody else, we talk about
`those Americans.' "
About ten years ago, Mintz
traveled to Israel alone, set
herself up in an apartment in
Safed, and devoted her time
entirely to painting, in and
around the mountain city. At
the end of five weeks, she re-
turned home with 55 com-
pleted works.
Watercolors and sketch-
book in hand, she wandered
the streets, capturing the es-
sence of Safed in a palette of
yellows, blues, oranges, par-
rot • greens and warm earth
tones. Storekeepers offered
her cold drinks as she
worked. People brought her
boxes to sit on. Self-appointed
sidewalk critics appeared now
and then and voiced their
opinions. Other on-lookers
stood silently, nodding ap-
proval of her work. A few
even offered to buy the
finished paintings on the
spot.
"It was perfect — one of
those times when I felt as if I
had a real mission. As soon
as it was light in the morn-
ings, I was out painting."
One of her paintings,
entitled Dreams Out the
Window, _was painted shortly
after.her return home from
the trip, and depicts the
anger she felt because she

Sybil Mintz

couldn't live in Israel. ("I
wanted us all to pack up and
move there. My husband has
always been supportive of my
work, and shares my feelings
for Israel. But he and my son
and daughter didn't think
moving was a very good idea
at the time.")
Rigid "bars" of masking
tape outline the painting, de-
picting the framework of a
window, so that a viewer sees
the painting as if she/he were
looking out through the win-
dow. At the center of the
work is an amorphous
"dream" disappearing into
the distance. Super-imposed
on the bars, in pencil, are
grocery lists, lists of errands
to run, lists of chores to do —
an attempt at symbolizing
the entrapment of reality she
felt at the time, Mintz says.
"I had this terrible feeling
of just (being) caged," she
says.
Mintz began 14,v profes-
sional career not as a painter,
but as an art teacher in De-
troit Public Schools in 1959,
after receiving a degree in
art education at Wayne State
University, and another in
painting at the University of
Michigan. She stopped paint-
ing and teaching after her
two children were born, and
didn't take up painting again
until both were in school.
(Recently, she returned to
teaching — this time at
Wayne State.)
Eventually, she began to
enter her work in juried art
shows in the area, including
the Michigan State Fair Fine
Arts Exhibit and the Scarab
Club Silver Medallion Ex-
hibitions, and was accepted.
Many other shows would fol-
low. In 1977, encouraged by
her growing success, she set
up a studio with seven other
artists near downtown Far-
mington, where she still
works today.
"In Israel, I work outside,"
she says. "Here, in the studio,
I work from my feelings, or
from sketches. Sometimes, I
come in and just start paint-
ing, and let the paint and the
brush strokes 'talk' to me.
I've done several paintings at
the studio that are just based
on moods."

.

The most recent of these
abstract works is composed of
kaleidoscopic splashes of
oranges, yellows, and greens,
so intense they seem almost
to glare and radiate. Titled
Sunburst, the painting, with
its bold brush strokes, has a
kind of exuberant, child-like
quality about it, as does
much of Mintz's later work.
Most paintings are done in
one sitting, she says, with lit-
tle or no "going back" or re-
•vising at a later date.
"Once I say it, it's said. I
paint according to how I feel
at the time — if I went back
to it at another time, I
wouldn't feel the same. I'd do
better just starting over and
doing another painting.
"I've always worked
quickly. When I was in Ann
Arbor, getting my master's in
painting, I'd sketch bus
people, restaurant people
,and, with that, you have to
sketch quickly. You learn to
get your ideas and your feel-
ings down in a few lines. And
I think that's carried over
into my watercolors.
"That's why I paint so
much with watercolor now.
It's fast, it's portable, it lends
itself to immediate expression
via the brush."
Mintz's paintings, which
easily number more than
1,000 now, are usually priced
anywhere from $300 to $700,
and can be seen in collections
and galleries in New York,
Los Angeles, Toronto,
Montreal, and several cities
in Israel. Closer to home,
some hang at the University
Hospital in Ann Arbor, the
American National Resources
Building in Detroit; the new
offices of Guaranteed Con-
struction Co. in Farmington
Hills, and are part of many
private collections in the
area. Locally, some of her
work is also on display at the
Troy Art Gallery, the Ann
Arbor Association Gallery,
and Modern Studio of Inter-
iors, Birmingham.
"When I paint, I'm hoping
to communicate_ an excite-
ment about life," says Mintz.
"I hope viewers feel that ex-
citement when they see my
paintings.
"I see art as very much re-
lated to mathematics in a
way," says Mintz. "As you
paint, you're constantly solv-
ing a problem, even when
you're not actively thinking
about it. Once you've put
down, a couple of strokes,
then where does the next one
go? The next has to work in
relation with anything else
you've put down. I see a
painting as a very complex
structure — you're pushing
something back in space, or
pulling it forward; relating
one color to another; relating
dark to light, shapes to
shapes. It's really a highly-
intellectual process." ❑

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