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May 15, 1987 - Image 92

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1987-05-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SINGLE

MAE'S
APRIL FOOL

an evening of comedy & variety

Featuring:
Paul Stanley, M.C.
Jeff Hopson, Magician
Tim Rollins, Juggling Comedian

Sunday, May 31, 1987
8:00 p.m.

Jewish Community Center
Wine and Cheese Afterglow

Tickets: $7 in advance, $8 at the door
Call 661-1000 (343) for. tickets.

Pic
Callcry

cordiaffy invites you
to a special- exhibit and safe
of photography by

Steven 5. Tapper

May 21, 1987 6:00pm to 9:00pm
• refreshments served.

264W W 12 Mile
Southfield MI 48034

358-3383

92

Friday, May 15, 1987

In the Franklin Savings Center
(Across from Tappers 9 eu(ers)

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

Microwave Cooking

Continued from preceding page

great asset for defrosting,
reheating and cooking conve-
nience foods. In this fast mov-
ing computerized world, it is
beneficial to train yourself to
increase your skills in
microwave cooking.
Skills
There are some steps you can
follow which will help niake
this an easier task. Your "Use
and Care Manual" is an in-
valuable source of information
on the basic programming pro-
cedures. Keep this booklet near
the microwave oven for ease of
reference. Read it through
thoroughly to familiarize
yourself with what information
it contains without trying to
memorize the procedures.
Then place a 1/2 cup glass
measure filled with cold water
in the microwave. Starting with
the first procedure outlined in
the "Use and Care Manual,"
follow the steps using timings
of 10-20 seconds. Go through
the booklet using this method
to try all the programming
features of your unit. For the
probe, be sure to start with cool
water, set temperature to
110-120 degrees. You can even
try out the delay start program
by using a short cooking time
of 3-5 minutes set 15 minutes
from the present time. Always
be sure to have the cup of water
in the microwave; it should
never be operated while empty.
Repeat entire procedure
several times to help you
understand and learn the
methods for programming.
Once you have used your
microwave for a while you will
remember more about its
operation.
Look at the food while it is
cooking to see if any area ap-
pears to be getting done before
another. If this occurs, rotate
the food or dish to compensate
for the unevenness. For ovens
with an even cooking pattern,
little or no rotating may be
necessary.
The next step requires
retraining yourself to try the
microwave for more of your
cooking. Before you start to
prepare a dish, whether a
snack, vegetable, main dish,
dessert, think microwave.
Do not automatically pick up
a pot or pan to prepare a recipe
conventionally. Look in your
microwave cookbook to find a
similar recipe or information on
timing and microwave pro-
cedures. Note timing on your
recipe for future microwave use.
Decide to try at least one new
recipe a week from your
microwave cookbook,
newspaper or magazine.
If you are determined to do
more with your microwave you
will succeed. Before you know
it, you will be amazed at the
"magic" of microwae cooking.
Whether you are new to
microwaving or a long-time
owner, everyone appreciates
microwave shortcuts.

Shortcuts
lb quick-thaw frozen whipped
topping, microwave a 41/2-ounce
carton on medium low (30 per-
cent) for one minute.
For a browner looking pie
crust, brush with dark corn
syrup, maple syrup or vanilla
for sweet fillings. Brush with
Worcestershire or soy sauce for
savory fillings.
Microwave a two-crusted,
frozen fruit pie for 15 minutes
on high, then place in
preheated 450 degree oven for
15 minutes or until browned
and juices are bubbling through
slits.
Soften brown sugar by plac-
ing a piece of apple or fresh
bread in a covered microproof
container with the hard sugar.
Microwave 45 seconds on high
or until the lump softens. Keep
in a tightly covered container.
Soften one stick of butter or
margarine in one minute on
low (ten percent, remove foil
covering first). It takes one
minute on high to melt.
Soften an 8-ounce package of
cream cheese at medium low
(30 percent) for two to 21/2
minutes, a 3-ounce package for
11/2 minutes. Be sure to remove
foil first.
Soften a wedge of cheese, dips
or spreads on medium (50 per-
cent) about one minute.
Ripen an avocado on medium
(50 percent) for two minutes;
turn over and microwave one
minute longer.
Get more juice from lemons
and oranges; microwave 25-35
seconds on high before cutting
and squeezing. Warm oranges
and grapefruits in the
microwave for more flavor and
juiciness.
Toast one cup nuts in glass
pie plate. Microwave for five-
seven minutes on high, stirring
every two minutes. Let rest five
minutes.
Hard cook eggs for salad and
casserole by placing shelled
pierced eggs in custard cups or
a microwave muffin pan.
Microwave on medium about
two minutes for one egg, less
than four minutes for two eggs.
The muffin pan will require
slightly less time.
Frozen
packages
of
vegetables may be cooked in
the cardboard carton. Remove
outer wrapping; place unopen-
ed box in serving dish.
Microwave on high for time re-

quired for the vegetable.
Frozen vegetables in sauce or
butter in plastic pouches are
easily cooked in a serving dish
by cutting a large X in one side
of the bag; place x-side down in
dish. Follow microwave cooking
instructions on box. Lift off bag;
entire contents will slip out;
stir and serve.
lb quick cook chicken for a
recipe or salad, place chicken,
skin-side down, in pie plate.
Cover with plastic wrap.
Microwave on high six-seven
minutes per pound, turning
skin-side up halfway through
cooking. Cool, bone, skin, cube
or slice.
Re move
odors
from
microwave by boiling one cup
water with one-two tablespoons
lemon juice in the microwave on
high for five minutes.
Freshen stale potato chips,
pretzels or popcorn by
microwaving on high one
minute or until hot throughout.
They will be crisp when cooled.
lb easily brown and drain fat
from ground meat or turkey,
crumble meat in microproof
plastic colander placed over
bowl or dish. Microwave on
high four minutes per pound,
stirring halfway through.
These ultra simple recipes
use four or five ingredients, sav-
ing you time from start to finish
— in shopping, preparation and
cleanup. Freeze or refrigerate
leftovers, reheat in the
microwave.

ONION BAKED
CHICKEN A LA ORANGE
21/2 to 3 pounds of chicken,
cut in serving pieces
1 (6-ounce) can undiluted
frozen orange juice,
thawed
1 envelope onion soup mix
% cup dry bread crumbs
Place orange juice in shallow
bowl. Combine soup mix and
crumbs in plastic bag; mix
together. Dip chicken pieces in
orange juice, then shake in bag
of crumb mixture to coat well.
Place chicken pieces in
12x8-inch microproof baking
dish. Sprinkle remaining
crumbs on top of chicken. Cover
with paper towel or sheet of
waxed paper. Microwave on
high 15-20 minutes or until
chicken is fork tender and
juices run clear, rearranging
chicken during cooking. Serves
4.

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