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May 15, 1987 - Image 74

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1987-05-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

STRICTLY KOSHER MEAT MARKET

26020 Greenfield Rd.
Oak Park in the Lincoln Shopping Center

967-4222

Right in Your
Own Driveway!

COOKING

/ THE
TUNE
-UP
1 - 4 MAN

os4

GLATT KOSHER MEATS

(at reasonable prices)

4
'

Fresh

CHICKEN BREAST whvings . $ 1.79 lb.
TRIM RIB STEAK ..... .$4.29 lb,

Any Cut

BEEF ROAST .........

.$2.99 lb.

WE NOW CARRY LUBAVITCH SALAMI AND HOT DOGS

Many More Specials in Our Self Service Counter

Under Supervision of the Council of Orthodox Rabbis

Certified by the National
Automotive Institute of Excellence

Comes to your home or office
with the garage-on-wheels

Valet service that doesn't
cost one penny extra

• Expert diagnostic tune-up
• Electronic analyzer -
all engine systems
• Professionally trained
mechanics
• Perfect results assured

Expanded Services
Call Sanford Rosenberg
for your car problems

398-3605'P.—

New Kosher Cookbooks
Offer Wealth Of Ideas

GLORIA KAUFER GREENE

Special to The Jewish News

T

6718 Orchard Lake Rd.

• 851-8020 •

Fresh Empire

BARBECUE CHICKENS

99ch

Extra Fancy

GRANNY SMITH APPLES

49C1

California

79c„D.

FRESH ASPARAGUS

FRESH
CUT
FLOWERS
DAILY

SWEET
MANGOS

89Ceach

ALMOND
NUTS
$2 99b

California

490„D

LEAF LETTUCE

10 lb. bag. U.S. #1

IDAHO POTATOES

Borden's

LOWFAT MILK

$1 39g.,.

All Specials Good Through May 20th, 1987

74

Friday, May 15, 1987

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

here has recently
been an upsurge of
kosher cookbooks. The
recipes in many of these
books are not necessarily
"Jewish" in the traditional
sense. That is, they have not
been handed down by genera-
tions of Jewish cooks.
The modern kosher recipes
are more what might be
called innovative or adaptive.
Some are for "nouvelle" dis-
hes that were uniquely
created by contemporary
cooks. Many other dishes
have been borrowed from an
assortment of international
cuisines and adapted for the
kosher kitchen.
New Kosher Cooking by
Colette Rossant (Arbor
House) and So This Is

Kosher: A New Approach to
Jewish Cookery by Ann Kaye

and Hetty Rance (Salem
House Publishers) are very
similar on first glance. The
covers of both books feature
an attractive color photo-
graph of artistically styled
food, and both books are di-
vided into chapters based on
type of dish. Both are primar-
ily recipe books with a mini-
mal amount of text, and they
emphasize recipes that are
likely to be unfamiliar to the
typical observant cook. And,
interestingly, both are writ-
ten by European authors.
On closer scrutiny, how-
ever, several differences be-
come apparent. New Kosher
Cooking has the smaller for-
mat of the two books, but it
has more pages and about
twice as many recipes. Most
of the recipes are preceded by
brief anecdotal notes which,
taken together, lead the
reader to deduce that the
author, Colette Rossant, is
originally French, but came
to the United States when
she got married.
Ms. Rossant's recipes,
many of which she learned
from a variety of interesting
people all over the world,
tend to be more unusual than
those in So This Is Kosher
and much more likely to call
for (though certainly not
limited to) "exotic" ingre-

dients such as silken bean
curd, salsify and shiitake
mushrooms.
While perusing
New
Kosher Cooking, I found an
omission that might bother
observant cooks. In at least
two recipes, the directions
call for sauteing "fresh chic-
ken livers," but never men-
tion that the livers should
first be kashered.
So This Is Kosher is a
high-quality production with
several color photographs.
The authors' biography says
that both live in London and
work for Radio London (Ann
Kaye is co-host of You Don't
Have to be Jewish), so I as-
sume that they are English.
Some of the recipes — like
Scotch Eggs, Plum Pudding,
Toad in the Hole, and Essex
Pond Pudding — do reflect a
British influence. But Indian,
Continental, Oriental and
other international cuisines
are also prominent.
The book seems to have
been carefully adapted for the
American kitchen, though a
few "Britishisms" have slip-
ped through. For instance,
the term "vegetarian mar-
garine" is used to describe a
meatless and milkless pro-
duce, what we might call
pareve margarine.
The authors use soy milk
in many of their recipes to
make pareve "cream" sauces
with meat, pareve desserts
and even pareve ice cream. In
fact, it seems that every re-
cipe in the book is either
"meat" or "pareve."
Though soy milk may be
difficult for some cooks to
find, I personally feel that
this nutritious food is much
preferred to the chemical-
laden nondairy creamers
called for in some other
kosher cookbooks. The
authors suggest looking for
soy milk in health food stores
and some supermarkets.
So This Is Kosher has a
special section on Passover
cooking that includes such
unexpected dishes as Chicken
Kiev, Corsican Paupiettes,
and Croquettes Lyonnais.
Each chapter has a short in-
troduction, and some of the
recipes are preceded by very
brief notes.

Continued on Page 76

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