100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

The University of Michigan Library provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes. These materials may be under copyright. If you decide to use any of these materials, you are responsible for making your own legal assessment and securing any necessary permission. If you have questions about the collection, please contact the Bentley Historical Library at bentley.ref@umich.edu

May 15, 1987 - Image 14

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1987-05-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

LARGE TREE SALES AND MOVING

Interfaith Relations

"Large Tree Movers"

Continued from Page 1

Residential - Commercial

Many Varieties of Trees Available

For More Information Call (313) 624 2055

-

G.P. ENTERPRISES

7520 Pontiac Trail • W. Bloomfield, MI 48033 • (313) 624-2055

ORCHARD LAKE ROAD AT FOURTEEN MILE • FARMINGTON HILLS • 855-3444

SEE OVER 100 CLASSIC FORDS
ON DISPLAY

THUNDERBIRDS • MUSTANGS • SHELBYS
50's & 60's PERFORMANCE CARS
CUSTOMIZED STREET MACHINES AND MORE

14

Friday, May 15, 1987

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

LOCAL NEWS

terfaith dialogue from the
various positions he has held on
the Jewish Community Coun-
cil. On the national level, the
American Jewish Committee
has been in the forefront of forg-
ing Catholic-Jewish ties.
"Since Catholics and Jews
are human beings they are not
always congruent on all issues,"
said Rabbi A. James Rudin, na-
tional director of interreligious
affairs for AJC. "If relations
were smooth we would have a
monologue, not a dialogue?'
That dialogue was made
possible largely by the Vatican
Council's 1965 statement on
the Jews, exonerating Jews of
guilt for Christ's crucifixion.
While the statement, Nostra
Aetate (In Our Time) also im-
plied that Judaism had been
superseded by Christianity, it
declared that "Jews should not
be represented as repudiated or
cursed by God," a radical about-
face for the Church which open-
ed up a theological avenue that
has since been used for
dialogue on social and political
issues by Catholics and Jews.
A focus of the interfaith
cooperation has been in the
fight against religious and
racial discrimination, accor-
ding to Fr. Kevin Britt of the
Archdiocese of Detroit. "My
personal feeling is that most
bigotry and hatred comes from
ignorance?'
As minorities in the United
States, long victims of
discrimination by America's
Protestant majority, Jews and
Catholics were actively involv-
ed in the civil rights struggle of
the 1950s and '60s. But
sporadic cooperation existed
long before the civil rights era
and the Nostra Aetate, accor-
ding to Jewish News Editor
Emeritus Philip Slomovitz.
In 1919, a bill was opposed in
the Michigan legislature whcih
would have compelled every
child to attend public school,
Slomovitz recalled. "It was an
anti-Catholic measure aimed at
reducing support for parochial
schools!'
Dr. Leo Franklin of Temple
Beth El joined Bishop Michael
Gallagher at a rally to condemn
the measure which was even-
tually defeated.

espite that and subse-
quent expressions of
goodwill, fundamental
issues still remain dividing
Jews and Catholics. One such
issue, which Jewish interfaith
activists are quick to downplay,
is Vatican non-recognition of
Israel.
Relations soured during New
York Archbishop John Cardinal
O'Connor's visit to Israel
earlier this year. Jewish hopes
that the visit would lend an air
of diplomatic recognition were
scotched when Pope John Paul
II forbade the cardinal to meet
Israeli leaders in their official
capacities.
"Things that were done and
said could have been done dif-

Archbishop Szoka:
Dialogue between
bureaucracies?

ferently," remarks Judge
Shepherd. "It was not made a
big issue over and it quickly
disappeared as an issue?'
Conversely, the Pope's visit to
a Rome synagogue in April
1986 was a welcomed event but,
added Judge Shepherd, "local-
ly we didn't need that to make
our relations better. It wasn't
needed as a catalyst?'
In Detroit, interfaith activists
seem. to be distancing
themselves from the interna-
tional arena in an attempt to
hold their coalition together,
apparently turning a blind eye
to world events over which they
have no control.
"For the first five or six years,
practically the only thing peo-
ple in the interfaith dialogue
talked about was the Holocaust
and Israel," explained Fr. Alex-
ander J. Brunet, director of
ecumenical and interreligious
affairs for the Archdiocese of
Detroit. "It was recognized
(later) that there are a lot of
religious things that can be
dealt with?'
Harold Gales, co-chairman of
the National Polish-American /
Jewish-American Task Force
agreed: ("Non-recognition of
Israel) is something that's
never been discussed. It could
be indicative that on the local
level there have been agenda
items that are more pressing?'
One such item may be im-
proving understanding between
Polish-Americans and Jewish
Americans. This ethnic, or na-
tional, dialogue is seen by
many as a sub-stratum of an
overall religious dialogue.
Gales explained that through
working together, both the
Polish and Jewish communities
have acquired an understan-
ding to each others'
sensitivities.
Obviously, the Holocaust is a
sore point for both cora-
munities. Shoah, Claude Lanz-
mann's epic documentary on
the Holocaust, "has been an
issue that has occupied a lot of
our time?' according to Fr.

Continued on Page 16

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan