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May 08, 1987 - Image 66

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1987-05-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

LET US GIVE
MOTHER THE KIND OF
MEAL SHE'D COOK
FOR HERSELF!

An

a' s Family Dining

OPEN. MOTHER'S DAY 8 a.m. to 10 p.m.
SERVING THESE GREAT SPECIALS
PRIME RIB OF BEEF Au Jus
$795
BROILED ORANGE ROUGHY ......
$6.25
HOMEMADE MOUSSAKA
$4.95
BROILED PICKEREL
$6.50
STUFFED CORNISH HEN
$6.50

MEALS INCLUDE: SOUP OR SALAD, POT. OR RICE
PILAF, VEG. & BREAD BASKET

Restaurant

6066 W. MAPLE,

North of Orchard Lake Rd. •

851-0805

OPEN
MOTHER'S DAY

12 noon to 10 p.m.

WITH GREAT

MOTHER'S DAY SPECIALS

VISIT OUR NEW

CARRY-OUT DEPT.

NEXT DOOR TO OUR FULL•SERVICE RESTAURANT

Featuring

• Pizza • Ribs • Greek Salads • Lasagna
• Chicken • Sandwiches • Etc.

OUTSIDE CATERING FOR
ALL OCCASIONS

TCOU PONT

$2 OFF DINNER FOR 2

SLAB OF RIBS

• GREEK SALAD

• BAG OF BREAD STICKS

Expires May 31, 1987
JN

CARRY-OUT LOCATION ONLY

coupoN1

BUY ONE PIZZA

GET 2ND SAME PIZZA

66

FRE

Friday, May 8, 1987

Joyful Noise

Continued from preceding page

27161 GREENFIELD, JUST NORTH OF 11 MILE

0 1 11 C U ATI- O ONU T O N L Y

ENTERTAINMENT

Expires May 31, 1987
JN

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

ture was prominently dis-
played on the congregation's
fund-raising brochure.
Another was Matlin's move
into acting.
"One of the most revered
professions among the deaf is
acting. Signing is acting, so
many want to be actors."
Goldhammer said he was
"always confident Marlee
would succeed as an actress.
But I never thought she
would win an Academy
Award."
One thing that disturbed
Goldhammer after Matlin
was nominated for the
Academy Award, were the
stories that appeared saying
what Matlin was like growing
up. Goldhammer, who had
close contact with Matlin
from the time she was seven
until she was 17, said the
stories gave an inaccurate
portrayal.
"I've been reading that she
was quite rebellious, very
militant, very hostile to the
hearing world. I don't remem-
ber that at all. I remember
her as very mellow, very easy
to get along with, someone
with no anger."
Matlin's mother, Libby, a
jewelry salesman, does add,
however, that her daughter
was "a feisty little girl who
wanted to spread her wings.
She often resented things be-
ing done for her, very much
like Sarah (the part Matlin
plays) in the movie. She's not
much different from Sarah."
And not much different, yet
very different, from the other
members of Goldhanuner's
Congregation for the Deaf.
Which is why on Oscar night,
he said, there were seven dif-
ferent victory parties hosted
by deaf families in the
congregation.
"The feeling was that when
she won, we all won. It gave
our members a new pride and
dignity that they can com-
pete on the same turf as the
hearing.
"It sent shivers up my
spine. I felt happy_ that I had
had the opportunity to study
with her, to be her friend and
to see justice done. It's not
often you see somebody get
what they deserve. Marlee
studied hard, worked hard,
had talent and God answered
her prayers. We feel this
Oscar was a magnificent part
of the divine plan:'
Though Goldhammer said
he hasn't been in constant
contact with Matlin since she
began acting professionally,
he said she did surprise the
congregation three years ago
by coming in to take part in
the temple's Purim Service.
She also, he said, has called
and written him regularly.
"Even though she's busy, she
still wants us to know she

remembers the Temple and
Judaism."
Two weeks before the
Oscars, Goldhammer got a
letter from Matlin inviting
him to lunch after the
Awards. "Not many young
actresses write their rabbi,
saying let's have lunch. It was
a God-filled letter. She is
clinging to her Judaism. She

believes strongly in the power
of prayers, talks often about
the strength God gives her. I
talked to her the day before
the movie started shooting
and she told me how grateful
she was to God for allowing
her to do the movie. She
strongly believes in God and
strongly feels she is blessed."
Indeed, in a recent inter-

Oscar winner Marlee Matlin pays a visit to her grandmother,
Rose Solomon, who lives at the Jewish Home for the Aging
in Los Angeles.

A Celebrated Grandchild

TOM TUGEND

Special to The Jewish News

W

hen Marlee Matlin
trimphantly clutched
her Oscar at the
Academy Awards, the folks
at the Jewish Homes for the
Aging celebrated right
along with the 21-year old
deaf actress.
Matlin, who was named
best actress for her screen
debut in "Children of a
Lesser God," is a frequent
visitor to the Jewish Homes
in suburban Los Angeles,
where her maternal grand-
mother, Rose Solomon, has
been living for three years.
Shepping naches, the
90-year old Mrs. Solomon
talked proudly about her
granddaughter's early
struggles, her Jewish identi-
ty, and her sudden fame.
Marlee was born and
raised in Chicago, where her
parents own an automotive
agency, said the grand-
mother. When the infant
reached 18 months, she had
a bout with German measles,
and shortly afterwards a
neighbor noticed something
amiss.

"The girl can't hear," the
neighbor told Marlee's
mother, but Mrs. Matlin
refused to believe it. "Marlee
can hear when she wants
to," the mother maintained.
When the diagnosis was
confirmed, Solomon re-
called, "I cried and cried and
said, the poor thing, she
won't be able to do any-
thing: ,,

But Marlee early on
showed the spunk to over-
come her handicap and
celebrated her bat mitzvah
at Chicago's Ibmple of the
Deaf.
"She became a wonderful
typist and told me she was
going to become a lawyer for
deaf people," Solomon said.

After the young actress
was chosen among 25 can-
didates to play the deaf
heroine of "Children of a
Lesser God," Marlee reas-
sured her grandmother that
the artist's life would. not
change her values.
"Don't worry, grandma,"
Marlee told Solomon through
an interpreter, "I'm going to
marry a Jewish boy." ❑

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