100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

The University of Michigan Library provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes. These materials may be under copyright. If you decide to use any of these materials, you are responsible for making your own legal assessment and securing any necessary permission. If you have questions about the collection, please contact the Bentley Historical Library at bentley.ref@umich.edu

May 01, 1987 - Image 47

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1987-05-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

New
maN
isn't just for men ...

it's for women too!

preview our spring collection

at

bip

somerset • the mall • troy • 649-9415

Two Great Names
0 Samsonite & Marmel
But One Great Sale

FITS LIKE A GLOVE.

®

of America, which nourished their own
families — despite underlying sympathy
for Israel's needs.
From the Israeli point of view, American
Jewish insistence on refugee status (and
advantages) for the Soviet Jews seems like
seduction. A small, struggling ministate in
the Middle East surrounded by hostile
neighbors cannot compete in the "free
choice market" with the magnetic allure of
the American economic colussus. Yet
Israel desperately needs a larger critical
mass of population, particularly people
with high educational attainment. As the
Israelis see it, questions of survival must
outweigh questions of ideological sen-
sitivities. And when it comes to ideology,
building a Jewish homeland takes un-
ashamed precedence for them over other
values espoused in the Diaspora.
Historical experience has shown Israeli
realists that the majority of Soviet Jews
who come out seek a better life for them-
selves and reunion with family members in
the United States much more than they
hunger for spiritual rejuvenation or Jewish
national identity. Only the vanguard of
Soviet Jews, committed refuseniks like
Natan Scharansky who have risked their
lives and well being for Zion, can be ex-
pected to be unswerving in their selection
of Israel if the choice — America or Israel
— is set out before them.
Soviets anti-Zionist propaganda has had
a much stronger hand in shaping Soviet
Jews' image of life in Israel than positive
Jewish education. Indeed, only a very
small segment of Soviet Jewry has had any
significant Jewish education at all. The ex-
tent of the revival of Jewish life in the
USSR is nothing less than miraculous
given the circumstance under which most
Soviet Jews were educated.
Israeli authorities believe that larger
numbers of Soviet Jews would freely
choose Israel if only they would come and
see it for themselves. But the feedback to
the USSR from Soviet Jews who have set-
tled in Israel cannot compete with the feed-
back from those who have settled in
America.
Can Israel reasonably offer all prospec-
tive immigrants from the Soviet Union a
big (by Soviet standards) apartment, a col-
or television set, two big cars and no pro-
spect of military service for the children?
Also, the tangled Israeli absorption pro-
cess does nothing to advance their case.
Reform of the competitive, duplicative
system in which government and Jewish
Agency departments muddle through
emigrant absorption ought to be a high
priority.
With all that, Israelis are justly proud

of the society they have created. They are
confident they can sell a larger proportion
of Soviet Jews on Israel if they can only
get hold of them.
Soviet Jews have their own communica-
tion system. The word they send back
home is: Go to America first. If you don't
like it, it's easy to go to Israel. But if you
go to Israel first and don't like it, you'll
have a devil of a time getting to America.
You will have lost your refugee status. —
and all the benefits thereof, including
financial support for settlement, education
and job training — because you are not
coming from a land of oppression but from
Israel, a free country. You will have to save
enough money to finance your move, no
small sum for an Israeli wage earner. And
you will have to enter under the normal
American quota for Israelis — and lots of
them want to come to America, too.
So the Israelis and the Americans are on
a collision course.
If Soviet authorities would permit direct
flights from the USSR to Israel, a solution
to the impasse would be simpler. Soviet
Jews with Israeli visas would naturally
board El Al flights to Tel Aviv. But the
Soviets do not have diplomatic relations
with Israel. Therefore no flights.
A flight via Rumania, rather than Vien-
na, might do the trick. (Rabbi Schneir an-
nounced this week that he has negotiated
such a plan, - but Israeli or American of-
ficials confirmed neither this information
nor a Soviet intention to increase Soviet
Jewish emigration).
Soviet Jews are resourceful people. A few
years ago American Jewish refugee relief
organizations tried cooperating with Is-
rael's wish that they deny aid to Soviet
emigrees. The Soviet Jews turned to other
American immigration organizations, in-
cluding anti-Zionist Orthodox groups and
church agencies, and found their way here.
One suggestion recently presented was
temporary suspension of the Israeli law of
return for a few months until arriving
Soviet Jews could orient themselves to
Israel. Israeli President Chaim Herzog told
an American Jewish audience recently that
he had floated that idea but was summari-
ly rejected. He should try again.
A solution to the current impasse needs
negotiation now — before any substantial
new Soviet Jewish movement begins. Is-
raeli and American Jews need to recognize
a situation in which positive values and im-
peratives of two similar but different
societies are in conflict. With diplomatic
finesse, a humane solution acceptable to all
sides — Israeli, American Jewish and
Soviet Jewish — should not be beyond the
capacity of Jewish ingenuity to achieve. El

SAVE 30%

ON ALL SAMSONITE PATIO FURNITURE

Suggested list for chaise, dining chair & ottoman $524.00. Now only
$366.80. Tables and matching umbrellas available. Additional 5% for
Cash & Carry. Pick up at Lone Pine & Orchard Lake only.

LOVESEAT

CHAISE

TWO SEAT GLIDER

DINING CHAIR

OTTOMAN

55" TABLE

_Eleg,-261-.76 $183.23 .131,a4k-1 209:07 $188.30 -RegrtagnCT $258.30

...Regr-ittflOCT $104.30 Ilog,--1643:5tr $74.55 Stet-95'3:25 $247.28

BROWN, WHITE, NAVY, SAND, YELLOW, EARTHTONE & PASTEL STRIPES

MARMEL GIFTS & TOYS

28857 Orchard Lake Road
Farmington Hills (Between 12 & 13 Mile Rds.)

553-3250

MINER'S DEN

JEWELERS

COMPLETE
REPAIR AND
RESTYLING

Exquisite
diamonds and
colored gem-
stones.

FINE CUSTOM DESIGNS

FRANKLIN VILLAGE 851-2 3 3 4
32716 Franklin Road

ROYAL OAK 585-6950
3417 Rochester Road

47,.

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan