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May 01, 1987 - Image 44

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1987-05-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

MARV
SAYS!

n
' HEE - E
ElitlAS°

MIRRORED BIFOLD DOORS

Come Seen()%

Spedab3

sg9"

tits most 511)

5' tubs
#'555.a

41=

TABLE TOPS

* tub enclosures
* shower doors
* custom units

• %, %,
% THICK
• BEVELED GLASS
• PATTERNS

VISIT
OUR-
SHOWROOM

a

"OUR
DOORS"
$8900 up

#B2480

BEVELED MIRROR
BIFOLD DOORS
FRAMED MIRRORS
ON DISPLAY

GLASS 8. AUTO TRIM
el
II II CUSTOM WALL MIRRORS
TIRES & ACCESSORIES

f STAB 0Si-if 0 IVO

11

54 TEARS SERVING ME TRO OTTROiT

SOUTHFIELD: 24777 Telegraph
353-2500
Other locations: Wayne and Lincoln Park

EXPERT
INSTALLATION
AVAILABLE

gallery yakir

presents

new works

by

AHAR011
BEZALEL
acclaimed Israeli Sculptor

Born in Afghanistan in 1926, Aharon Bezalel is an artist and teacher at the
Bezalel School of Art in Jerusalem. His sculpture is exhibited worldwide,
especially in Israel, the United States and Canada. In Michigan alone; he has
built two monuments located in East Lansing. His works are also found in
private collections locally and nationwide.

MEET THE ARTIST

Sunday, May 10, 1987 2:00-5:00 p.m.

— Show continues through May 31st —

29080 Inkster • Southfield, MI

gallery yakir

(second house North of 12 Mile Road)

44

Friday, May 1, 1987

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

ANALYSIS

"YOUR
DOORS"

352-4290

PLO Unity

Continued from preceding page

Palestinian refugee camps, it
was unable to deal a decisive
blow against the PLO forces.
This failure proved to be a
compelling factor in Presi-
dent Assad's reluctant deci-
sion to send his army into the
Lebanese capital.
The Syrian leader aspires
to pacify Lebanon through
local proxies, and a powerful
PLO force, perhaps the single
most powerful force in the
country, would defeat his pur-
pose unless he was able to
exercise a significant measure
of control over it.
President Assad, say the
Israeli analysts, was also
unsettled by the prospect of
the rejectionists and Arafat
loyalists acting independent-
ly to translate their military
cooperation into a political
rapprochement. Hence his
decision to come to terms
with Arafat.
Most Israeli observers are
awed by Arafat's incom-
parable flair for political
strategy and his mastery of
the art of physical survival.
Some see his latest turn as
yet another tactic to buy
time, mend fences and pre-
pare for a fresh initiative and
another flurry of activity.
His first priority, they say,
will be to distance himself
from his old alliance with
Jordan and dispel any linger-
ing notions that King Hus-
sein has a mandate to speak
for the Palestinians.
"He is striving now to
unify the ranks of the PLO, to
strengthen his position and
then to call for a fresh Arab
summit to reassert the right
of the PLO as the sole
legitimate representative of
the Palestinian people," says
Dr Avraham Sela, a Middle
East specialist at the Hebrew
University of Jerusalem.
Arafat, he says, also
recognizes that a strong,
united PLO is far more
valuable than a weak and
divided organization, and
that when he is once again
ready to entertain the over-
tures of the moderate states—
Jordan, Egypt and Saudi
Arabia—he will be able to
command a high political
price for his favours.
"I do not regard the Algiers
meeting as the end of the
game," he said, "but rather
the beginning of a new
phase."
In the meantime, though,
Sela believes that by embrac-
ing the rejectionists, Arafat
has effectively killed the Mid-
dle East peace process—at
least until after the next U.S.
presidential election.
"Whatever small chance
there may have been for prog-
ress in peace-making has now
been reduced to zero," he says.

"Arafat cannot join with the
rejectionists, who object to
every formula for a diplo-
matic solution, and still talk
seriously about peace."
"It makes sense for him to
use this time to reunify the
PLO and attempt to secure a
better bargaining position if
the talks get going again."
Israel, meanwhile, was
given an early warning of
Arafat's intentions even
before the Algiers summit
opened last Monday.
The previous day, a squad
of three armed Palestinian
fighters, members of Arafat's
own Fatah faction, penetrated
the heavily defended Israeli-
Lebanese border for the first
time in seven years with the
apparent intention of seizing
Israeli hostages and giving
dramatic effect to Mr Ara-
fat's tactical switch.
The three were killed by an
Israeli patrol, but not before
they themselves had killed
two Israeli soldiers.
It was a timely message
and, perhaps, a taste of
things to come. ❑

Israel Rejects
Norway Request

Jerusalem (JTA) — Israel
has rejected a request by
Norway to clarify for the In-
ternational Atomic Energy
Agency the use it made of
two consignments of heavy
water it received from Nor-
way in 1959 and 1970. Heavy
water contains more than the
usual proportion of heavy
isotopes, such as deuterium,
and is an important ingre-
dient in the manufacture of
nuclear weapons.
Israel's response to the
Norwegian request was con-
veyed by Foreign Minister
Shimon Peres to Prime
Minister Gro Harlem Brundt-
land of Norway when they
met at the conference of the
Socialist International in
Rome last week.

Envoy's Fate

Washington (JTA) — More
than 100 members of the
House have signed a letter
urging Soviet leader Mikhail
Gorbachev to free Raoul Wal-
lenberg, the Swedish dip-
lomat who saved thousands of
Hungarian Jews from the
Nazis during World War II.
The letter, signed by 113
Congressmen, urged Gor-
bachev to release Wallenberg,
who was arrested by the Red
Army outside Budapest in
January 1945, or provide a
"full, complete and public ac-
counting of his fate."

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