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May 01, 1987 - Image 42

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1987-05-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

=11111111111111111111111111111111114:

AWARD WINNING PHOTOGRAPHY BY

tit

RONALD'S
HAIR & CO.

BUD HOLZMAN

AL

TOGR.APHERS

851-3590

HAIR FASHIONS
BY RONALD

284 S. HUNTER
BIRMINGHAM - 48011540 - 6922

1111111111111111111111111111111111

23720 Southfield Rd.
Southfield, Mi.

557-0680
Open 7 Days • Eves. By Appt.

Oopoi

These stores were not listed in our previous ads.
ARTISTIC SPECIALTIES • ilona and gallery
LADIES • Sherri's

Zoeivnza4z,76

HUNTERS SQUARE/TALLY HALL

ORCHARD LAKE ROAD AT FOURTEEN MILE • FARMINGTON HILLS • 855-3444

HELEN DAVIS

THE
STADIUM

855-4460
ORCHARD LAKE & 14

Landscaping • Design Service • Unusual Plants

851-5440

Open 7 days a week

10 minutes from Downtown Birmingham

_ 5899 W. Maple Rd. • V3 Mi. West of Orchard Lake Rd.

42

Friday, May 1, 1987

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

PLO Unity: A Victory
For Hardliners

Special to The Jewish News

AT HUNTER'S SQUARE

West Bloomfield

ANALYSIS

30878 Orchard Lake Rd.
Farmington Hills, Mi.

erusalem — The dra-
matic reconciliation
between the moderate
and rejectionist wings of the
Palestine Liberation Organ-
ization (PLO) last week has
killed any chance of an early
breakthrough in Middle East
peace, according to senior
Israeli political analysts.
It has also provoked spec-
ulation that the stunning vic-
tory of the PLO's hard-line
rejectionist elements may
inspire a long hot summer of
violent political upheavals
among Palestinians from
both inside and outside the
West Bank and Gaza.
Israeli analysts are clearly
alarmed, though not entirely
surprised, that PLO chair-
man Yasser Arafat has for-
mally abandoned his path of
"diplomacy" and "modera-
tion" in favor of the dogmatic
"armed struggle" approach of
the rejectionists.
The rapprochement, which
was cemented at a meeting of
the Palestine National Coun-
cil in Algiers, has ended more
than four years of bitter
rivalry and estrangement be-
tween Arafat and the hard-
liners, who reject any political
compromise as a basis for
attaining their goal of an
independent Palestinian state
on the ashes of a vanquished
Israel.
Observers note that while
two headline-catching rejec-
tionist leaders—Abu Nidal
and Ahmed Jibril—were ab-
sent from the Algiers meet-
ing, seven other faction
leaders, including the heads
of the two major groups, Dr.
George Habash and Naif
Hawatmeh, were present.
Dressed in olive-drab
military uniform, Arafat
received a tumultuous recep-
tion from delegates at the
plush Algerian conference
center when he reverted to
the old rhetoric of the rejec-
tionists, describing the
meeting as "a session of unity
and steadfastness:'
The PLO leader pledged to
continue the armed struggle
against Israel until the
Palestinians had returned to
their homes and established
an independent state with
Jerusalem as its capital.
At the same time, he ex-
pressed support for the pro-
posed international peace
conference on the Middle
East. But he insisted that the
PLO must participate as a
full partner, a condition that

sli

Arafat: The PLO leader has
rebounded from seeming
defeat — again.

is unacceptable to both Israel
and Jordan and thus effec-
tively torpedoes any further
discussion on the subject,
procedural or substantive.
Observers believe that
Arafat's uncompromising
rhetoric, which followed a
week of tough preparatory
meetings between the PLO
leader and the rejectionist
leaders, is evidence of a new
direction in PLO policies.
The split within the PLO
was caused when Arafat, ex-
pelled from his headquarters
in Beirut along with his
fighters after the Israeli inva-
sion of Lebanon in 1982,
threw in his lot with the
moderate leaders hi the Arab
world.
He established close rela-
tions with President Hosni
Mubarak, who is reviled for
upholding Egypt's peace
treaty with Israel, and he ex-
pressed a readiness to pursue
a diplomatic solution to the
Palestinian problem in tan-
dem with King Hussein of
Jordan.
Among the most immed-
iate effects of Arafat's new
hard-line approach has been
the announcement last week
that the PLO is abrogating a
1985 agreement with King
Hussein on a joint strategy
for achieving Middle East
peace.
The essence of the accord
was an agreement by Arafat
and King Hussein to jointly
negotiate an Israeli with-
drawal from the West Bank
and Gaza, which would form
a homeland for the Palesti-
nians in confederation with
Jordan.
King Hussein suspended
the accord in February last
year after Arafat apparently
reneged on a promise to

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